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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/20/16 in Blog Comments

  1. A story with a happy ending. Vision AGI were receptive to paying for our third party costs and have paid up. Plasterer in Friday to cover the hole and then we paint. Good as new. Thanks everyone for the support and the words for the email. Phew.
    7 points
  2. Well this was a long cup of coffee... It's common to try and exclude consequential loss but my understanding is it may only be enforceable with business customers unless the contract was specifically negotiated with you rather then being standard T&Cs. I believe you, being a "consumer customer", also have statutory rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015 in that excluding consequential loss probably amounts to an unfair contract. https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/consumer/somethings-gone-wrong-with-a-purchase/claim-compensation-if-an-item-or-product-causes-damage/ https://www.consumercouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/2019-09/A_Guide_To_Consumer_Law_for_Businesses.PDF https://www.squirepattonboggs.com/~/media/files/insights/publications/2015/10/the-consumer-rights-act-how-does-it-impact-on-brand-owners/cra-article-for-consumer-brands-alert.pdf https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/450440/Unfair_Terms_Main_Guidance.pdf Reading on it appears they believe the exclusions of unforeseeable consequences would be ok but the exclusion of foreseeable ones would be unfair. If that gets raised I'd argue that the consequences of a leak were reasonably foreseeable by both parties! So looks like a pretty certain that a consequential loss exclusion is unfair when the buyer is a consumer. I'd get quotes for the repairs and send them a letter asking them to pay up before you do any work. Point out that clauses in contracts with consumers which use terms like "consequential loss" are considered unfair. I believe you have to give them the opportunity to fix it before you can get it done yourself by a third party and claim compensation. Give them a two week deadline to respond? You could probably also claim for your time locating the source of the leak but I think I would just point out that that by taking action to promptly identify the source of the leak, and removing sodden insulation yourself, you have minimised the possible damage and the cost to the rooflight company. I've also been reading something about the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Directive which provides an alternative to court action. I think TrustMark is an ADR provider. Perhaps find out if the rooflight co is a member and involve them?
    6 points
  3. One of my favourite jobs when it's going well. I even used up the scraps to gain some brownie points when I was doing my step flashings.
    6 points
  4. The vision vs the reality
    6 points
  5. Unfortunately I have come across this attitude before but quickly nipped it in the bud by talking about the build process and using words they didn’t expect a woman to know, can’t stand men like that and certainly wouldn’t give them my business. Hubby had put some of them in their place too when they tried to address him instead of me and he turned round and said there’s no good talking to me you need to talk to the boss!
    5 points
  6. I can empathise with your feelings. Part way through our build my father in law died. We were both hoping he'd live long enough to see our house finished, but it wasn't to be. I did put a small memorial to him, and my late father (who died back in 1972) right up at the very top of our house:
    5 points
  7. Plus one to that. I've used gas all my life and would never consider electric - until induction. It's quicker than gas It's more controllable than gas - I have never been able to get a proper simmer on gas without moving the pan half off It's much much much much easier to clean It looks so much neater than a gas hob It's safer - it only heats the pan so the surface only gets hot where the pan is and even then it's nowhere near hot enough to burn if just touched. You have time to remove your hand before you are burned It's safer - when you remove the pan it automatically switches off it's safer - handles don't get hot, even metal ones. When I used the same pans I am using now on my gas hob I couldn't pick the pans up with a holder, now there is no problem.
    5 points
  8. Is that all, come on I’m bored stiff sat here pictures of the big hole please picteres of progress c,mon c,mon I’m about to kill one of the in-laws if they ask me another stupid question about my polystyrene house.
    5 points
  9. Hi @ProDave This is exactly why I am doing a "blog" detailing my experiences and routes for various aspects of the self build. We will never be embarking on such a project again which is a great shame when you consider the "learning" one gains from such a venture. Yes, I can sit back and reflect on where I could have made a saving and or used a different approach but as long as we get over the finish line without breaking the bank, I shall consider it a successful mission. I just hope others reading this record will be able to consider options they may not have considered, as explained by either myself or contributors such as yourself.
    5 points
  10. Day 1 of roofing, took best part of the day to actually get the trusses on site. But at least it's a start! Roger in place as always to offer a reference of scale ???
    5 points
  11. This is the Christmas present my husband lovingly made for me, as a permanent reminder of my favourite ever comedy sketch. He taught himself embroidery just so that he could make this!!
    4 points
  12. Thanks. Its funny actually out of all the plots I found, the 4 acre plot was the cheapest (less than a third of others). It was by chance a owned by a previous self builder who built a passivhaus, who sold it to me for the very reason he wanted a self builder to have it, could have went for 3 times the price. A very nice man.
    4 points
  13. I don't like the design of that one little bit. I would have expected there to be some form of gutter around the perimeter of that, with that able to drain somewhere safe, to give a safe exit for any water that does make it past the seals. No doubt they will remove the glass, re seal everything and put it back, and then all will be well. Until next time...... When it is off, make sure every single fixing screw hole is well sealed, that will be where it is getting into the building. And since the framework does look to be larger than the upstand, I would talk to them about the idea of drilling safe weep holes to allow any seepage out onto the roof.
    4 points
  14. Things take a while when you are self building don't they? So, back to this circular rooflight internal finishes joinery. I thought you'd all like an update, particularly @Onoff who I was expecting on site back in November ? Here is what has been done. Firstly, there was a slight thermal bridging issue with the metal frame for the roof light being inside the thermal envelope. Got some drips earlier in the year when plaster was drying out and condensing up there. Not a huge amount we could do easily but I have at least stuck some aerogel (left over and lying around) on those areas. Those are the silver triangle pieces. Hopefully there will be less moisture (than plaster drying out) when we are living in it. Back in Jan the tackers said they would have no problem with that rooflight meaning that HWMBO was left with stud wall construction only. And this week was the week for them to do it. They turned up with a flexi 6mm board (that they also said was moisture resistant). They used some plasterboard to batten out slightly from the square bits of the hexagon, some 25mm battens a little bit further out and then some creative battening across the corners and then they bent the 6mm board into shape and fixed it. Today they did the top bit (no photo, too dark when I got home). But they have left the plasterboard about half an inch short of the glass and made sure that the black edge is covered (in case the finished skim isn't quite circular - otherwise the absolutely circular black edging would show it). I'll post again after the plasterer has been in on Monday - hopefully he'll have no issue with it. But so far so good. Did have to hire a huge tower scaffold though. Ours only goes up about 3m and they needed the platform for this work at over 5m. Its still pretty hairy standing on a step ladder on top of the platform but even I can reach the roof light from the top. Bodes well for painting.
    4 points
  15. @Tennentslager I thought it looked like an old carpet from 70s, hopefully it will be warm. It was very itchy and scratchy to handle. @Redoctober UFH is an option for a suspended timber floor. I think @ProDave has done this on his I believe you use a dry screed mix on top of the subfloor, don't know whether the system differs. At the moment our heating is going to be electric and our stove. I want to utilise the firewood on our croft and hopefully next year make a peat stack. The house is classed as a crofter's cottage, so looking to use the croft to heat the house where possible. I want to use the electric radiators really just as a quick boost early in the morning. Hopefully the amount of south facing will provide sufficient solar gains for most of the day. Although it can be windy here, generally the temperatures are fairly mild through the winter and the recent snow was fairly rare. The house is well sheltered from the prevailing wind coming off those mountains behind the gable end and from those cold north winds behind the house. Here is a couple more that my wife took when I was working overtime in the office ?
    4 points
  16. God how I wish my dogs could do it I’m sure they would have the same sense of urgency as we do! Yes you’re right it can be a lonely place a building site, we get very few visitors even the family don’t visit because I suspect they can’t comprehend how we can live in a caravan, my son in particular thinks we should just buy a house and settle ourselves down but for the money we had we were only going to get a small house and we’ve tried that already and it didn’t work.We too went and looked at an ex council house just after the foundation was poured and it didn’t go as planned, but we decided to continue and I’m sure in the end it will be fine but you do get these moments when it all gets too much, for me writing it down did help and all your words of encouragement are much appreciated
    4 points
  17. Yep, had my own wobble this week. I tend to have a depressive episode around this time of year (second half of August, first half of September) and sort of know to discount it a bit. Last Sunday (19th) I went up to the site to try to finish off fitting the membrane on the west gable but what with the slight depression and it being the first day I'd been able to work at height for a week I was already feeling a bit frustrated. My safety glasses (needed most of the time for the reading bit on the bottom) kept misting up under the midge net and the scaffold tower was being awkward to put together and I rather lost it - threw a few bits of tower down pretty hard breaking one platform and one top ladder section. Haven't been up to the site since except to check that no other parts of the scaffold tower are damaged and to pick up post. Through the early part of the week I was pretty seriously thinking about giving up on the whole project. On Wednesday I went and had a look at the outside of a cheap ex-council house that's up for sale and started thinking through what I'd do with it, etc. Since then I've been thinking on two separate tracks at the same time: if or if not, while trying to do useful things to get out the depression cycle, which I am but still feeling a bit fragile. E.g., today moved most of my office stuff up from the living room to the small bedroom as that'll be a lot easier to heat in the winter. So, yeah, maybe this forum needs a Mental Health section. Whatever, reading and talking on here has helped. Thanks all. More amusingly, either I'm reading this wrong or you have very well-trained and dexterous dogs…
    4 points
  18. Certainly didn’t cough up! We came to an ‘agreement ‘ where they are paying 83% of the cost, feeling pretty pleased with myself actually and glad I decided to fight it.
    4 points
  19. We have stick built primarily for cost saving, will share the actual cost later but hopefully £50K+ saving, fortunately have some time and energy though I do feel a bit bushed in a good way at 53 and the challenge and satisfaction from it all. Also having the support of my Dad, he's 74 has been invaluable and an opportunity to spend time together. Maybe that sounds a bit odd. I am still enjoying it.....
    4 points
  20. Well, after an awful night, the Building society rang me very first thing and said everything is fine and the issue was never in doubt at thier end ! Offer coming out this week. On hearing the issues he gave me his direct number and said "look, just deal direct with me from now". Not impressed with Buildloan!
    4 points
  21. 4 points
  22. Hi @Jenki No. But will do in the next few days (at least start it....) M
    3 points
  23. No 1, the immersion heater. Put the 3kW element back. Fit a PV diverter, These send excess power to the immersion heater and by pulsing the power ensure the power sent to the immersion heater exactly equals the surplus that would otherwise be exported . The tumble dryer. Good for getting a heat pump model. Now modify your usage. A TD does NOT need to "dry" the clothes. We use it sparingly for "fluffing" the things like socks and towels. A short time in the TD then finish the drying on the airer (or outside in summer) is all that is needed to ensure fluffy towels. The rest of self use is shift the use of the big appliances to the middle of the day, on a timer if you are not in. The other thing I do is have the timer for the ASHP set to start DHW heating at 11AM. By then there should be reasonable PV generation so some or possibly all it is using will be from the PV. Fit an export meter (if you don't have a smart meter) so you can see how much you are exporting to see how well you are doing. I am only exporting typically 100kWh per year.
    3 points
  24. I dropped out of running my business in Australia 10 years ago and purchased a run down property in the middle of nowhere…. I work away for two solid months of the year and make the rest of my income from renting out accommodation to visitors. I need to get another building finished and available to rent before I am of the breadline but the quality of life is excellent, I wake up and the day is mine, everything i do is about maintaining or improving the property I live on, if I work hard my goals get closer, if i work less then it’s more relaxing. It’s a good life and I hope I never have to go back to working 9-5.
    3 points
  25. At least we all know who to call when GRP roofing needs doing in your area. Seems they did it in nice, easy to manage, sections. Idiots try to do too much, too quickly. And your main contractor will hopefully learn from this. There is nothing wrong with GRP when done properly. I should last decades.
    3 points
  26. I believe that it's best to fit the Willis heaters so that the immersion is at the bottom, rather than the top, so as to avoid getting an air pocket adjacent to the element that cannot be bled out. Alternatively, they can probably be mounted on their sides, with the side pipe poking upwards. I'm no expert, mind, it just seems more logical, and potentially a bit safer (in terms of avoiding overheating the small bit of element in the air pocket) if they are arranged like this. It may be that the MIs say different, and MIs always trump any other advice.
    3 points
  27. Notes of an update, which perhaps would benefit from an article of its own. Before: After: 1 - Grabrails The older person for whom the room was adapted has spent a couple of weeks mainly in a wheelchair, following a slip off the settee (note to self: investigate a custom cushion with non slip fabric for the settee). This slip was caused by weakness following sickness for a small number of days, which caused some weightloss - only 2-3kg , but significant for someone weighing around 43-45kg. Recovering more normal energy intake will help that over several weeks. A couple of months in we have made adjustments to some elements that had been left in until we had decided what to do. We have fitted trombone-Hitler grabrails as per the photo below. I have no idea what the real name is of the piece of kit. On these grabrails we have fitted 2 types bought from Screwfix, Croydex have not been very impressive in this situation, Nymex have been. Croydex have more play at the hinges, whilst Nymex have rubber bushes at the hinge to hold the rail steadier. The extra row of holes is where we got it slightly wrong with the stainless steel grab rail. ( * The action is like a fascist salute, and it looks like a trombone; it seems highly appropriate to remember an evil Dictator in the name of a piece of kit to benefit people he wanted to kill, in the spirit of The Producers.) 2 - Radiator Width We have also narrowed the radiator, as the previous one is exactly the same width as the wheelchair usually used in the shower room, which has the effect of preventing the wheelchair backing against the wall by about 50mm. That may seem like a detail, however gaining an extra inch makes the transfer if the user wishes to do it sideways (rather than face on) feel more comfortable. That is an example of how tiny details can make a difference. 3 - Squeezable Wheelchair Another detail is that the wheelchair used for this bathroom is a folding wheelchair, and the width can therefore "squeeze in" by about 2cm, which makes it just fit between the loo and the shower, and also slightly wedge itself in, which also helps. I admit that that was not planned. 4 - Turning Space Remarkably there is also room to turn the wheelchair in the alcove by the shower, though this is miles from meeting regs for a turning spot. None of these details would work for a larger or taller man, but in these circumstances they do - a strategy of "marginal gains". 5 - Wheelchair Accessible Shower I also have a plan for making the shower wheelchair accessible should that prove necessary, which simply involves removing the end screen (about 4 screws at the wall end, the block at the top, and a Stanley knife cut along the silicone bead at the bottom), plus raising the floor by 125mm with a tightly fitting but non screwed stud frame, and a ramp from the door, which would then be topped with ply and tiled or covered with vinyl. This can then be removed to do a full restoration later. 6 - Individual Adaptations It is worth noting that some of the above is only possible for the particular small individual. If mum were a rugby player we would be whistling in the wind, and would have had to go with a full wetroom.
    3 points
  28. So the roof of the tower is nearly complete, the slates are in and all we need now is the lead man to do the hips.
    3 points
  29. You get about a 1/3 m out of the pump lines when they clean them through @Adam2, a good idea is to have someplace to put it, shutter up a box for the chicken coup to sit on or make a base for the wheelie bins, I have 3 posts that hold up our carport that sit on concrete pads, so pre dug some very rough holes ready for the overspill. You need to nominate a washdown area for the pump guy, plastic on the floor with a sheet of ply on top so it’s easy to shovel up the mess. Its all relatively straight forward with a bit of planning.
    3 points
  30. @Oz07 We used smart ply propassiv https://www.buildingcentre.co.uk/news/smartply-propassiv-sets-industry-first-standards-for-airtightness which is the airtight version. The joints were all taped. @Russell griffiths Fabricator who did the flashings was ACL Sheet Metal in Hereford. https://www.aclsheetmetal.com/ I would recommend them. If they had any questions they asked, the order was turned round quickly and we were pleased with the quality of the final product.
    3 points
  31. And here it is fully boarded. Plastering of it starts Monday. So far so good.....
    3 points
  32. Summer of 2017 - photos of the paddock near the stable. Our daughter wanted wild flowers for her wedding but she then brought the day forward from June to May due to another family wedding clashing. The flowers looked beautiful on the original wedding day but were not out on the wet and wild day she actually got married on.
    3 points
  33. 3rd Draft arrived this afternoon - I think we are there!!
    3 points
  34. Nothing says "I love you Faye!" like lead poisoning! ?
    3 points
  35. Be aware that UV isn't a true sterilisation method, it acts as a disinfection system but even then it only works reasonably well if the water supply to the UV unit has been filtered to < 5µ. If the supply to the UV unit isn't filtered down to this level then UV treatment won't do much, as bugs will be shielded from UV by the fine particles that haven't been filtered out. A 5µ filter will need pre-filters to take out the larger stuff, or else you'll be replacing filters every couple of weeks. UV treatment also has an annual running cost of around £80 to £100, roughly 50% of that is electricity and 50% the cost of UV tube replacement. To that you need to add the cost of the filtration system expendables, which depends a great deal on how clear the water coming in is. Might be worth considering a backwashable filter vessel 1/3rd filled with Turbidex, as that will filter down to close to 5µ on it's own, and can be backwashed to clean the media, rather than having to replace cartridge filters. Backwashing can be run automatically at night (our main filtration system does this, a backwash every 4 days, at around 02:00). I'd try and avoid over-complicating any rainwater harvesting system if you can, as even a basic system will require a bit of regular looking after and the simpler the system the better, IMHO. If you can restrict rainwater use to non-critical uses, like toilet flushing (and NOT running the washing machine, they don't normally get hot enough to kill any bugs), then you can get away without much in the way of filtering or disinfection. My experience is that any form of water treatment requires maintenance and incurs a significant running cost.
    3 points
  36. Blimey. That sounds like an STD.
    3 points
  37. Five years ago a friend had an air tightness result of 0.9ACH and she was disappointed because she had put so much effort into taping etc. The house was very comfortable with no cold spots or draughts. To help her I ran the PHPP to see what the effect of different air tightness values would be on the space heating demand. Results below. I asked on the AECB forum why the PHI had set the maximum value at 0.6ACH and had an answer from Mark Siddall shown below. So until you get to relatively quite high air tightness values, space heating demand is not affected greatly. Of course the PHPP has been designed to work at the low end of air tightness. Pressurisation Test Result ACH Specific Space Heating Demand kWh/(m2.a) 0.2 12.1 0.4 12.3 0.6 12.5 0.8 12.7 1.0 12.9 2.0 14.0 A 2pa pressure difference (what you get over 2 a storey building) would mean that assuming a 1m long, 1mm wide gap would permit about 360g of water vapour to be transported through the gap in 1 day. On the basis of the internal temp being 20C/50%RH and ext. temp of 0C/80%RH then you can expect this moisture to hit the dew point as it passes through the insulation. The air tightness threshold is 0.6 so as to protect structure from moisture damage.
    3 points
  38. I know how you are feeling @Christine Walker. I was pi55ed off to the back teeth with the build as once we physically moved in the motivation for hubby to get on and finish things seemed to wane and everything took forever. That was annoying but it would have been finished eventually, but then he got f***ing cancer that was the shittiest thing to happen ever and not only did it take his life it changed mine forever too. From the point of his diagnosis onwards it was pretty much down to me to sort everything in areas I didn't understand, with trades that let me down or ripped me off, in a self build that I had never wanted to take on in the first place. Somehow, just somehow you brush yourself off and get on with it, and as things start moving again nothing seems as bleak as it does during those low points. Resilience, strength and determination are your friends. There are people and processes, and sometimes just bad luck that will try to derail you and knock you off track but you will get through this I know because you have shown strength and resilience already to get this far. It might not seem better today or even next week but things will get better and you will put this behind you and move on (and in!).
    3 points
  39. Everyone gets that low point where you wonder why the fcuk did I start this. Just remember how much you have done and done right and in a year you will laugh at how you let it worry you. And letting of steam is always good. Don't keep it in as it will fester and then it will really get you down. Have a rant on here or give it to the first trade that tries it on. Whatever works for you.
    3 points
  40. Fingers crossed you get a bit more progress made with your new guy.
    3 points
  41. Better late than never - a final post for this blog. the house eventually sold on 1st June - two years minus two days since we bought it. the buyer is very happy and so are we. we have had some time away from renovating but new plans are taking shape - not quite what I expected but it will do for now. tell you more soon! ?
    3 points
  42. What a great start and an even better solution. Self build seems to be a long list of daunting operations that one has to corral into an orderly list, you then need to read the “for dummies” before deciding if your going to learn to be the expert or if its something you can safely outsource. Reading the posts on this forum really sheds some light on the many mysteries of a self build and often shines a bloody big spotlight at potential problem areas. Thank god for BH ...... learning every day.
    3 points
  43. @Ferdinand A little history on how we ended up here which may explain the outcome. I’m 31, this is only the 2nd property I’ve ever owned. The first being a shared ownership flat I bought 3 weeks before the recession hit and 8 years later I sold for less than I bought it for. I had a 5 year sharesave plan with work that was due to pay out in July 2016, I had made a good profit on it and the amount was enough to allow us to leap the property ladder a bit, looking around we couldn’t find anything we wanted to purchase should the money have been in our pocket. Anything we did like was way out of our price range £300k - £350k. We saw this plot of land with planning permission for sale, liked the house and saw enough potential to change things to make it a home we could love. So the brief was always to get my wife and I a house we simply couldn’t afford, in size and spec. The planning permission was originally submitted in 2000 and was reapplied for several times, so many things were not included that may have been part of it had the design stage actually started from 2010 onwards. 1 - Passive house or any particularly environmental facets were never really considered, MVHR wasn’t part of the design and I wasn’t even that aware of what it was until I was well in to the build. I had brickies on site 3 months after completing the purchase of the land, so there was no dwell time to consider things like that. Remember the brief above, we NEEDED a house! I did quickly look at solar panels, but the capital expenditure just wasn’t an option we had. Briefly read up on 3G, again was disregarded due to cost, although I can’t remember what that was now. 2 - yes traditional block built house, trussed roof. We did consider block ground floor due to retaining wall and then timber frame on top but due to access issues and overhead HV power cables a crane was unlikely. Plus the 3 little pigs came to mind and I wanted a house made of bricks! I got 3 quotes for the watertight shell and all came in around £75k - and the end my chosen builder did say to me he believes he underquoted by approx £10-13k, so it could be argued that this cost should be factored in. 3 - as above the build is on our absolute limit of affordability of capex, however we do have a reasonable monthly income between us - may sound daft but I can afford a monthly gas bill more easily than I could £10k for a heat pump (this may be an age related perspective ?). If we added in many of the features that people here like to include the house would simply not have been an option to us. Either make it smaller or go back to the drawing board and pick up associated architect and planning fees - none of this was an option. 4 - Doors were Travis Perkins, £90 for a FD30 and £70 for a standard door, this was well under budget and proved to be a big cost saving on what I had expected. Flooring was £42/m2, so a reasonable cost, I think the wide board again makes it look like more than it is, link posted in a previous comment. The grey floor tiles in small en suites are indeed Wickes, the grey wall tiles are from TileMountain.co.uk @ 9/m2 and look much better than that price. The large format 900x450 black tiles were also from tile mountain and were only £25/m2 they don’t photograph well but look great in real life, a kind of rusted iron look to them with a slight sheen/glimmer that really shows off when wet. The tiler thought they cost me £60m2 upwards and couldn’t believe what I paid for them. 5 - Labour. Electrician was £3500 labour only, he used my site as a “hospital job” doing a couple of hours on odd afternoons when other jobs ran shortness or cancelled, or on Fridays when he wanted to finish up close to his home. I pestered him to ensure he always stayed ahead of where I was and his slower progress never ever impacted anything I needed to be doing. He was an acquaintance already and we ended up with a good working relationship. For example it took him about 4 months to complete first fix 100% but as I say this never mattered as any room I needed to board or progress onwards was always completed. - Plumber - friend did boiler room and snagging of my work for £1000 all in, this figure came about as I told him I only had £1000 for plumbing labour, so that was that. I did all first and second fix myself. - Plasterer / Renderer - £6000 labour only for external render, internal scratch coat and skim. Cousin of mine so no other quotes were obtained because I know his work his top quality (he works on a lot of the ridiculous houses being build in Rock, Cornwall - Gordon Ramsay’s place included). I probably did get some mates rates here but I don’t actually know to what extent, 4 plasterers on site at one point who I didn’t know so they all had to be paid out of the total. Tiler - £160 a day, my advice is don’t be afraid to use day rate, if you trust the tradesman you could both end up with a better arrangement. When you ask someone to quote on price you are offloading the risk and paying a premium for this, my advice here would be to de-risk the job as much as possible yourself then get some one in on day rate who will be happy to do a good days work for a days pay. Joiner - £100 a day, this was a bit of luck on my part. Skilled joiner had some health issues and couldn’t drive at the time I met him, was getting himself back in to work after an extended sick period so was willing to work quite cheap. At first I was picking him up each day but he got his licence back during the build. I’ll agree this probably saved me a fair bit, I’ve had him here working for the final 4 weeks. Ah the jack and Jill bathroom - I think my first post here which I remember your good self replying to offering advice. Well we took it and now have 2 separate bedrooms with 1.8 x 1.5 en suites, 1 with 1500 Bath 1 with 1500 shower. It’s the ones with the light grey tiles. Much better than the jack & Jill so thank you. The drive retaining wall is just standard blockwork, only completed the day of the photo so still very green. Further down it will transition to Gabions to keep costs down. We we do have space for another property, actually several more but the guy I bought it off, who is now our neighbour placed a covenant on it that a I could only build 2. Ground is slightly made up at that end of the site so I don’t think footings would be easy. As I said before I think some sort of lodge garden room structure on a slab may be what happens there, and may look at the possibility of Airbnb’ing it. However I liked this plot as it’s private and I don’t think I have any sort of knack for customer service. I may still build the lodge but use it as a Cigar and Whisky lounge!
    3 points
  44. Here's my entry to the Buildhub shed of the year, I'll be living in it for a couple of years if I don't finish the bathroom :
    3 points
  45. I have one of those, unfortunately it's at the 4 inches from the end of my bed in my teenage bedroom that I now share with my wife and dog! It makes BBC breakfast seem like virtual reality as its curved and about 3ft from my face, shame susanna Reid isnt on it any more ?
    3 points
  46. Slow going on your own and with no scaffolding... but that the hardest side done! Just need to finish the easy side now...
    3 points
  47. Well, the beam and block is all done and foul drains work starts on Monday. Today we've been sorting through stone for a drystone wall.
    3 points
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