Onoff

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Onoff last won the day on October 16

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About Onoff

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  1. Kitchen sink - what is happening here?

    You could probably re-assemble what you have with CT1 and it'd go nowhere. Just clean all the parts first with Multisolve or meths. Leave to set overnight. It'd just be fun if you ever wanted to get it apart again!
  2. Router - What do I need to know?

    The DW625 is the same, 'kin lethal!
  3. Router - What do I need to know?

    I think it's a Triton thing I've just been given. Orange metal frame that you can fit a router, circular saw to etc. Looks far too complicated!
  4. Case Study: Water stains on a brick wall

    I thought it was salts leeching out?
  5. Router - What do I need to know?

    +1. Before you do the routing you can lay one worktop against the long wall then lay the other one on top of it at NOMINAL right angles (suitably packed up). Thin masking tape is your friend doing worktops btw. I'd have been lost without my chippy mate teaching me. Mitred corners are fun:
  6. Router - What do I need to know?

    Seems they're BOTH, my DeWalt & your Elu the dog's danglies for worktops: http://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/104266-dw625e-lx-type-6-a-2.html
  7. Router - What do I need to know?

    Yep, noticeably so. Picking it up one handed is a feat. This thing is a proper big boy's toy. The weight is off putting at first but the stability and control it affords offsets that. The bearings on this are superior and it has slow start too. DW625E LX: It wouldn't take prisoners if you got it wrong but you might not feel it!
  8. Router - What do I need to know?

    The 110V DeWalt I have here is a proper beast. Heavy but so, so smooth.
  9. Router - What do I need to know?

    Worktop jigs can have different pin holes for different width worktops. Always clamp your jig. Always cut from left to right. Plan your cuts so you'll only ever break out through a chipboard face at the end of the cut NOT the "melamine" face. Routers make damn good edge planers for ordinary Contiboard - jigsaw to within say 3mm of the required cut line then use the router to finish against a clamped fence. Have you a biscuit joining tool or bit for the router? No.20 biscuits too. I was lucky, my chippie mate versed me on routing! Mottled patterns are more forgiving! This is a breakfast bar made in the cheap with standard worktop that had only one rounded edge:
  10. Oh the irony: the annoying irony

    .You could.....rip it out of the wall, repair and whack it in a length of surface trunking "just for now". Or, depending where the switch is now, move it up above the damage. I've actually lowered one light switch to 1200 via crimping a new bit of T&E on.
  11. Oh the irony: the annoying irony

    This was to demo joining two bits of T&E, 2.5mm new & old in this case, (note the cpc (earth) might be smaller): Dead easy on a bench, fiddly in a wall, even getting the crimping tool in of course: Strip the sheaths: Stagger the joints so you don't get the "python after a large meal" bulge in the middle. The join needs to be long enough so you can slip the heatshrink on and slide along far enough to do the crimping and ideally shrink the crimp without affecting the tubular head shrink: Strip the ends: Heatshrink slipped on BEFORE you crimp! Crimp heat shrunk - has glue in that melts and sticks to the core: Green / yellow sleeving on. SOMETIMES as said above you might want a smaller crimp for the cpc: Cpc done: All neatly crimped, old colours for the heatshrink 'cos I've got it: Heatshrink over the top: Chuck it in the wall and get plastering! Similarly it could be soldered but make damn sure you get no sharp wispy bits of solder that might poke through the heatshrink!
  12. Oh the irony: the annoying irony

    No, not mine but clearly from the same school of thought! Only difference is I used heat shrink crimps to g'tee no moisture is ever getting in that crimp! Ordinary crimps are fine though.
  13. Oh the irony: the annoying irony

    ISOLATE THE POWER!!! ...before you do anything. Potentially, touching that screw you could get a lethal belt. You need to expose the cable which will mean digging it out to expose. Crimping is fine. I have some idiots guide pictures to doing a proper job somewhere.
  14. Replacement dwelling

    Get your kids to take the model in and pretend they made it. Unwashed, holes in their clothes, maybe borrow a malnourished dog; "Please Mister, can we have a new house!" style, that should sway it!