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  1. Yes the weather was dreadful.
    6 points
  2. Time for an update! Here is how it looks now. Just the lower wall to finish off on the left hand side. Apart from the roof tiling, all DIY by myself and the Mrs. Before:
    6 points
  3. I think their solicitor might be conflating two completely separate things: (i) a right of way over his property to be able to wheel machinery and building materials to your property; and (ii) nuissance from your building works. Issue (i) comes to establishing that you have a right of way over his land. That will depend partly on deeds/paperwork but also on whether you can evidence that others, particularly you and the previous owners of your property, have exercised a right of way over the land in question for a sufficiently long time such that the right of way arises by prescription. I believe that period of time is 20 years, and owners can change during that period as long as there is more or less continued use of the right of way. Here is an explanation from my favourite law firm name: https://www.wrighthassall.co.uk/knowledge-base/claiming-a-right-of-way-by-prescription#:~:text=What do you need to,in use are relatively short. If the right of way is meant to be enjoyed by the whole street, then other's evidence will be relevant. Obviously if there are access gates between gardens or even just gaps in the fences, that in and of itself is useful evidence. Issue (ii) doesn't currently stand up. Nuissance in the building context can only really mean two things: noise and dust. As for noise, this is policed by the local council. Check what their rules are, usually noise is permitted from around 8am to 530pm Monday to Friday and some councils also allow noise on Saturdays for a limited number of hours. So just set out in writing what the local council's rules are and confirm that you will abide by them and no noisy work will be done outside of those hours. As long as you do that and as long as you stick to those times there is F all he can do about it and no court will grant an injunction on that basis. As for dust, as long as you take reasonable precautions (e.g. wetting very messy stuff before cutting it (like tiles) there isn't much he can do. You are not currently causing a nuissance or threatening to do so, so again no injunction would be granted. Issue (i) is the more difficult one to prove.
    5 points
  4. Do you know the trick to see if the glass is coated? You shine a light (smartphone LED good for this) and look at the colour of reflections from each glass surface (four for double glazing, 6 for triple). The coated one will look a slightly different colour... This shows the coating is on the outer surface of the inner pane of my coated double glazing.
    5 points
  5. Even though I'm disappointed in the airtest result of 1.8 (the thermohouse roof panel system is NOT airtight, despite what they say!), I'm happy enough. First time seeing an EPC with no potential improvements! We hit the passive House heat requirement target but not the airtightness so certification not an option.
    5 points
  6. So I have been tinkering with my collection of "stuff that will come in handy one day" Anyone reading beyond this point has to make a promise not to laugh, at least not out load. So put together a test water wheel entirely from bits you have to hand: The business side, that will collect the water. Yes that is a bicycle wheel, and the trial set of "buckets" that will go around the outside to collect the water and so cause it to rotate, are indeed baked bean cans. Looking at the other side, that is the pulley and belt from a dead washing machine. It is driving a little DC servo motor as my trial generator candidate. Initially I tried the pulley from the washing machine motor, but that only gave a 9:1 ratio, I felt it wanted more, so I made a very much smaller pulley for the servo motor and I have got to about a 17:1 ratio. The whole lot is mounted to the end of a length of aerial pole. The shaft is a length of M12 threaded rod and the bearings are old idler bearings left over from a previous cam belt change on my car. They mount to the aerial pole with a heavy duty aerial pole clamp set. The proposal is to mount the aerial pole pivoted about it's mid position giving somewhere for a counter weight and easy height adjustment. And since the motor is right in the "splash zone" it will have a plastic cover to keep it a bit dry A similar one will will also be fitted over the bearings We need to eat some more baked beans before there are enough cans to give it a water trial.
    5 points
  7. The next stage of the setup of the site took place over the last 3 weeks. with some good progress. The trip up North, 433mile from our current rental in the NW of England. I set off on Wednesday morning in the 7.5T truck, and the 2 dogs for company. I took some materials with me, and had a gut feeling I was overloaded. I had worked out the approx. weight of what I was taking, but was unsure of the TARE weight of the truck. so I didn't take all I was planning. Luckily the nice guys from VOSA, At Carlisle (Todhills check site), confirmed my suspicions when the invited me in for a check. I was over weight, but the truck and my paperwork were all in good order, and they give the truck a thorough looking at. The upshot of this was me renting another 7.5T truck for storage, offloading the excess weight, driving the remaining 333 miles, unloading, returning the next day with the empty truck, re loading and driving back to site. 1100 miles in 38 hours. not what was planned, but you live and learn.... I arrived back on site on early Friday morning, 02.30am. and slept in the cab of the truck, until I was woke up at 05.10, by the guy delivering the Static, he was at the end of the road... Here's a screen grab of our new home arriving to site, this was 05.25 am... I hired a contractor to carry out the highway works for the site entrance, basically as he had the correct insurance and RAMS it was easier to get this stage subbed out. The idea was he would open up the site, with a 5 T digger, start the initial road and stone this up with around 60T of type 1. I would then meet on site and hire his man for a few days to assist with the pecking of the treatment plant. This didn't go to plan, they had to use a 13T machine, as it was available, so when I eventually get to site on the Thursday, due to the size of machine, the operator has completed the initial works, then pulled out approx. 60M of the road, and pecked the treatment plant hole, and I got this for free... 😁 Having a 13t machine on site, with operator for the Friday, I needed to make the most of it, as I was only paying for the rental of a 5T machine. Mikey the operator, made short work of pulling out the remainder of the road up to the location of the house, in total this road is around 90M. Next I had him strip the area for the house. The house is around 13M x 7M, so I wanted to strip back a working area around the house, my thought was we would hit the bed rock so this was the plan, we marked out a 16M x 11M rectangle, and he set to it, it took him about 2 hours to strip the land and scrape it clean. The above is the bedrock where the house will be, and the road coming up the side of the house. (I used a geotextile as a separation layer for the road, although in sections the road is on bedrock anyway,) You can make out that there is a fall from the top left falling to bottom right, this will be made up with type 1 stone, raising SW corner of the house around 700mm, I will raise the road in this section and use some of the top soil to level this out a bit and soften the impact. The last Job for Mikey was to dig me the trench for the services, he dug a 600mm wide trench about 8M short of the Treatment plant (to allow me access to move the spoil, and a similar distance short at the other end for me to connect to the water. just shy of 60M. Friday was a busy day on 3 hrs sleep. The treatment plant also arrived as can be seen above, I went for a Tricel unit, this was based on cost, treatment, dimensions and availability. Last job for the day was to move the caravan, Mikey helped me with this and we stripped a bit more land and located here temporarily for the night North / South. Saturday I decided to get the water connected to the caravan, for this I needed to complete the trench from the standpipe to the large service trench. I never dug this on the first trip as I was concerned about the electrical supply to my neighbours property. Cables seemed to run across my field at around 300/ 400 mm depth. I used my contact at SSE and he arrange to get the cable moved / deepened. This was carried out a few weeks prior and we discussed the position of the new road, and he made a site visit and we talked about me extending the water pipe trench in both directions so that I could also lay a utilities duct to the road for broadband. So to say I was a bit surprised, and p***ed off when I cut through the neighbours supply cable. The cable was as I was worried about 400mm deep, and the marker tape was next to the cable.... How to upset your new neighbours by having their electricity supply stopped two times (1 for the initial connection, 1 for the remedial works), only for me to cut the cable for a third time.... At least they were very prompt, they arrived after about 40mins, and it took him around an hour to re-joint the cable. I then removed the water standpipe and ran my new water main up to the caravan. It will tee off for the pods at some point, and then continue up to the house. SO now I had running water in the van, and gas for the water heater and hob / oven. Sunday was glorious, so I caught up on my sleep, and had a restful day. Scottish Power were due to fit the meter on the Wednesday, so I needed to get my service cables from the meter box into the service trench and up to the caravan and to the pods. I dug a trench across the road and through to the service trench. I used a 125mm Duct, and inside here I ran some 6mm SWA to supply the pods and some 50mm Duct to run a service cable to the caravan and ultimately up to the house. I pulled the cables through, and I have put a caravan hook up point next to the static. Tuesday / Wednesday, I had 80T of Type 1 MOT delivered in stages, I spread this out using the Back hoe, and vibrating roller. so by the end of Wednesday I have the base in for the road. which will give me good access for deliveries. Scottish power were a no show..... Discussing the caravan with the neighbour they advised turning the caravan 90deg, so it was end on East / West as the stronger winter winds tend to blow from the West, and being side on would ultimately be unstable. I dug out another section of land next to the caravan with the idea of swinging the van around at weekend when Mandy Joined me for the last week. It took me and Mandy all Saturday to move the van, using the backhoe to pull it around. and most of Sunday to get it jacked up off the ground and levelled. We dug 4 pits later on in the week and concreted some anchors in to chain the van down. The van in position with Mandy getting the best job of the week to squeeze under the van and start to insulate the water pipes... Scottish Power let us down again with a missed appointment on the Tuesday with a promise of Friday.... They actually turned up late Thursday and fitted the meter, so we had power on the Thursday night. We spent a couple of days moving spoil around the site to create a mound of earth to shelter and soften the impact of the pods, this was also a planning requirement for the neighbours amenity. Still work in progress and there's 10's of tonnes more to move. Last job before packing up on the Friday was to level the base of the treatment tank pit. At this point we were still waiting for the building warrant. so couldn't actually install the plant. We end the week by getting the Building warrant approved, and the certificate for discharge for the treatment plant both on Friday. Thanks for reading..
    5 points
  8. My suggested response: Dear Sirs I refer to your email of [date]. In your email you suggest that “Any use my clients have made of their own property or the passageway is entirely without relevance” as “It would not set any legal precedent on which [I] can rely". You appear to have misunderstood the point. My argument is that all residents on that side of [name of road] have a right of way over that passageway. Therefore, the fact that your client has made use of that passageway to cross other neighbour's land is entirely relevant since it supports my assertion that a right of way exists over the entire passageway, including your client's land, for all residents on that side of the road. I would therefore be relying on your client's use of that land as a matter of fact to support my legal argument, not as a legal precedent. Indeed, the fact that you yourself are referring to the “passageway” as such is telling. It is a passage that shows the way across your clients land for others to make use of to access their own properties. Your client’s position has no legal merit and your correspondence on this point is misconceived. It is patently obvious that your client's purported objection on the grounds that no right of way exists is a thinly veiled objection to my development proposals, as evidenced by his prior objection to my planning application, in a new guise. I urge your client to reconsider his position, failing which I will have to escalate matters to protect my rights, all of which remain expressly reserved. Obviously litigation is a costly endeavour, but I will resort to it if necessary and seek my costs of doing so from your client. Yours [@woz]
    4 points
  9. My wife and my self have had a busy two days getting the joists in and deck down while it’s still dry Last time we where doing this it was Boxing Day With thick frost on the joists
    4 points
  10. Today i had the steels delivered In the past I’ve manhandled them with a few mates This time due to the height (3000) and advancing years I hired a Genie 55 quid well spent with the help of the two steel guys we placed the steels on trestles under where they where going This allowed me to bolt them together and bolt Timbers in Unlikely previous times Once all the Timbers where bolted in It was a one man job to lift and drop them in position
    4 points
  11. Here's a pic of ours, been heating our house 'since Dec last year. Diy....maybe you can tell that from the piccy! It uses ~200g of R290, not an F-gas, but lots of care is needed. It lives outside, but inside the ongoing garage EWI to keep it a happy temperature all year. We still have the gas boiler plumbed in - Mrs RobL needs a year of heatpump use to be convinced we can disconnect. I say she needs more faith. It's 600W in, ~2400W out. Ish, as it's very hard to measure accurately the heat out. Standby loss is 2W from a micro logging stuff, there's no heaters, no immersion nonsense, no fancy clever stuff, just on or off and a few safety checks (flows, temperatures). I reckon it cost: £500 for the bits you can see and £1500 for the stuff under the ground you can't. And "some" time, which is of course, free:-)
    4 points
  12. And do what ..?? Are you an expert ..?? What if the bottom 2 courses of an 8 course block wall aren’t to your liking ..? Are you wanting the whole lot taken down and redone and at who's cost ..?? Build a relationship and trust. Talk to them, explain they are building your dream and not just throwing up just another box. Buy the bacon cobs on a Friday morning, make a brew occasionally… pick up a brush and do some tidying … but above all, treat them like decent humans who are earning a living doing something you either can’t or don’t want to do … Finally … don’t assume they are all the same please, it will get you nowhere… trades talk, and if the builder thinks you’re an arsehole, then the local trades will all soon know too …
    4 points
  13. Maybe it would be more environmentally friendly to clean contaminated soil, thereby helping nature.
    4 points
  14. Hello! Not so active on here these days but finally finished this project! Thanks again to the buildhub community, always an excellent sounding board! I'm running a competition for a free stay on Facebook, wondering if I can post the link here?
    4 points
  15. Different takes on approach here from Peter and Charlie. BH is about say buying your first house/ flat, doing it up, then..maybe self building or just sitting back and saying I did that once and that suits me, innovation, the excitement and that deep personal reward you get, feeling of achievement. I think Charlie and Peter to my mind have identified part of the problem. Charlie mentions new SE's coming in not knowing about the building regs in detail, it's a valid point.. on a social level it could be defined as the division of labour, see for example Adam Smith.. The Wealth of Nations for a bit of background. In summary we all have become more specialised in what we do as the population has grown and now we are arguing the toss about a few quid between Architects and SEs etc. We used to draw on paper, now we use a computer.. it's just a tool. I can spend a day, sometimes more on cad just working through a detail that will last for 50 - 100 years more I hope! Before I could go through a wad of paper. Folks on BH.. it's the thinking time that counts not how fast you can move a mouse. @CharlieKLPbut the same can can be applied to young Architect's and other young designers. It's not their fault that they maybe have less intuition about how to realise their designs economically so that they will actually get built. My advise to the folk on BH is this. Rather than look to save everything you can on professional fees find the right fit for you. You need to work to find the right person for you, they are there and they will save you money in the long run. Bear this in mind. A good tradesperson will cost you £250.00 per day at least. Say £1250 a week. A good designer only needs to save you one weeks labour on say an extension and they have washed their face, never mind any material savings.. and here we are splitting hairs on how fast you can draw in CAD or look up the building regs to check something! Don't get hung up on a few hundred quid on design fees and how fast someone may be on cad. The test is this. Can my designer deliver what I want and save me more than I'm paying them any extra in fees compared with just getting a bog standard "off the internet" design.
    4 points
  16. I'm wondering if I can download all the series, cause I will travel the next month and need something to watch. Maybe I can download it from torrents through 1337x . Has anyone found these series on torrents yet?
    4 points
  17. I need to watch it from the beginning
    4 points
  18. I recently decided to repair the house, and I immediately decided what kind of interior design I wanted. I still think I to hire a professional to discuss this topic with him and implement my idea. So far, I have decided to start with installing check radiator outlet, which will only emphasize the style and aesthetics of the future design. I really look at ready variants of interior designs in the style of austere modern classics.
    4 points
  19. I hired a designer, but you have to choose responsibly. And I was very satisfied with the work.
    4 points
  20. Yesterday extra PV and SE battery were added. SE battery not commissioned yet but apparently charging from solar ( I can't see this yet as commissioning needs to be done ). SE Battery quite a chunky monkey. Apparently the top 20% of it is an automatic fire extinguisher ( so I was told by installer ). Because I have a PW2 as well when Tesla app shows Kw from solar it's potentially fibbing as it could be nicking lecky from SE. None the less some strange behaviour today!. As no PV generation yesterday as panels off the PW2 charged off peak as expected. But look at just after 6am today!. Something emptied it!. Not possible for SE to draw from PW!. No idea what would sup all that juice - never seen that happen before.... Will update this exciting thread once I have more info.
    3 points
  21. My apologies 🙄. Yes, olive eating into pipe, and the fact that the whole functionality of the olive is to compress onto something rigid, which reinforces by design how it is lunacy to turn / tighten it into soft plastic. The plastic cannot offer any opposing force so just gets displaced. The nut gets tightened until ‘someone’ decides it’s “tight enough” and the resultant joint is a compromise even before you’ve put water in the pipe. The issue of the insert being used ( or not ) is of zero relevance, as nobody here can compensate or advise against idiots not following instructions. However, when the instruction is to do something poorly, and it comes from the manufacturer, go figure. I’ll not defend that any further, just a plumber on the tools for 3 decades stating what’s shite, and why. That’s impartial and free advise, given on a take it or leave it basis.
    3 points
  22. Daughter goes to the gym. Comes home, goes straight in the shower for 15 mnutes. WTF!!!! When we go swimming, we make use of the facilities included and have a shower there before we leave, we never shower at home on a swim day, why would you? And if I say anything like why did you not shower at the gym to save our energy use, I just get call grumpy old dad. This younger generation are not going to learn about energy saving until they eventually get their own house and have to pay their own bills, then they are going to get a shock. Until then I am expected to shut up and bite my tongue when i see them undoing my energy saving measures.
    3 points
  23. Anyone habitually starting and binning companies every so often is dodging/hiding something whether its paying tax, avoiding warranty calls, inability to run a business, scamming suppliers or customers etc etc. No matter how knowledgeable they are, would you want them doing that to you or part way through your job?? If they take credit cards, pay the deposit on a card so at least youve got section 75 cover
    3 points
  24. The're about to install one via me for my current full M&E package clients. Defo Rolls Royce, Bugatti even, but very good credentials for when it needs to count and boasts a CoP of 6 if installed to their ( very fussy ) criterium. CVCsystems also design and specify for my MVHR stuff, and Nick Vaisey is their in-house passive guru who is extremely helpful. Vitor is the ASHP guy, and he has also been very helpful in coordinating the above SE ASHP installation. Thoroughly recommend you talking to these guys.
    3 points
  25. You could try self amalgam repair tape.
    3 points
  26. Defo not HWRC for us, purposely designed NOT to need it, tbh couldnt see the point of making thehouse super efficient and then running HW around the pipe syetem just so you can have instant HW. If you are super insulated and more importantly, airtight, then a log burner will almost certainly over heat your house in next to no time. We chose not to have one mainly due to pollution issues, but also because the times we could actually light it and remain comfortable would be extremely limited, even here in the Lake District.
    3 points
  27. House is flying along (other thang getting in the sliders) They have almost finished the render board and first fix. Next week they will start on the plasterboard and the render. Mum and dad sold their flat today for crazy money, thought we might have missed the peak of the housing market. So that takes a lot of worry away and will help to pay for the cost increases on the new place.
    3 points
  28. Have you allowed for the restriction of the outlet that each pipe terminated into? VS what will come out of the end of the pipe? All completely academic imho, as larger pipes / higher dynamic flow rates etc are all arrested by the outlet and its governed output rate as set by the European standards for the max typical flow rates ( in line with water consumption regs ). The gross variables involved make this nigh-on incalculable afaic. The flow rates will all shift the second another outlet is opened elsewhere too, so further reducing the dynamic flow rates. For actual real world experiences, I have done multiple 10mm and 15mm radial whole of house installations, with pipe runs up to and beyond 30m, and there are no real world issues at all. Either install a HRC or just wait. As for filling a basin, you simply start shaving BEFORE the basin is full Simples!! Too much maths here, and I genuinely fear you're worry over nothing.
    3 points
  29. Almost ready to cover up with APR and plasterboard. I used Kilmat as @Nickfromwales suggested to help with any noise. The clips are 40mm clips used on 32mm pipe with foam tape wrapped around to reduce noise transfer. The pipe exits the wall within a 100mm square from the floor and the wall. At the other end you can see the pipe exit at around 500mm from the floor and with H and C written just above where I am going to send the water feeds through. I think those holes are 60mm higher than the waste hole and 80mm apart. The plan is for the feeds to then split inside the room to feed the two basins as that puts fewer fittings in the wall. I'll need to use elbows on the feed pipes as the wall cavity is only 70mm and the bend radius is 120mm/80mm for 15mm/10mm pipe. I could exit the wall at an angle but I think that could look bad.
    3 points
  30. 1. When you install a floor / bottom in a basement, do you still need a load of insulation. If a basement is underground on 3 1/2 sides. Just a lightwell exposed. If that floor is say 4mt underground is the temperature not stable, and quite warm at that point ? Yes you do, although not quite as much 2. I believe that to comply with building regs you have to have Two methods of keeping water out ? Any idea what is normally done ? I was thinking about a french drain around the base to a sump with a pump which would take that water to a suitable soakaway ? I'm not sure what other methods might be used ? Often either waterproof concrete or external membrane and perimeter drain plus type C internal drained cavity. 3. I know that sometimes basements are constructed using formwork, and waterproof concrete. Any ideas as to what other methods might be suitable ? Concrete block 4. If a bathroom was to be fitted in a basement, i take it that a macerator pump would be required to take the waste up to ground level where it could be discharged into a normal 100mm soil pipe ? Mini pump station is better and quieter as it does not need to blitz, only runs occasionally and has a decent bore discharge pipe.. 5. Any directions to web sites, or you tubes, that might give me a better idea of methods available ? 6. Anything else you think i might need to consider ? Ground investigation will have a large impact on the engineering. Also consider ventilation and fire escape.
    3 points
  31. I think I heard that they are openly doing this to reduce the 'shock' of the next rise. This may be a reasonable thing to do for the great unwashed, but for those of us that keep tabs on it all, it seems a bit cheeky. It is the standing charge increase that pisses me off, part of the increase is to cover bad debt. Others debt in other words. Can't see why I should pay for my junky neighbour to have power for nothing. What happens if your bill, for a year, is less than 400 quid?
    3 points
  32. Option 1 better for all reasons stated. Think about shower room access from boot room area looks like you have an outdoors lifestyle and would you come in needing a shower saves trampling through hallway. Regarding fundamental architecture of house - your house, your money, your choice. I think it is helpful for contributing members to support you in your choice and make suggestions to make your choice even better, perhaps with tweaks or amendments especially if they have similar style houses. As my house is very different style to yours I’m unable to assist with that. Good luck !
    3 points
  33. We’ve gone with a big rectangle as it's cost effective and will fit well with the surrounding houses. Ignore the roof shape as that's not what it will be, that was just a drawing to show the site layout and prior orientation. Roof will be hipped. Question anyway was on the floor plans. We've not been lied to, was a turn of phrase, will correct. Question anyway was on the floor plan not who drew it or what their qualifications. Appreciate all the concern on that but not what we're after. Helpful feedback is welcome, we're not changing who is doing this and seeking some constructive input not what we could or should have done.
    3 points
  34. It’s red 🤔, ah yes all welded up, sprayed and ready for the road 👍
    3 points
  35. The problem is not much better with a conventional unvented hot water cylinder. The ASHP uses the lower of the 2 thermostat pockets to measure the tank temperature. Near the end of a sunny day like today it is reading69 degrees. All that lovely heat courtesy of a bit of sun, some chemistry and some electronics. BUT from watching what happens next, there is "room for improvement" Someone takes a long shower (far longer than necessary, but they blame the duration on the amount of products needed to be applied to their long hair, a problem I do NOT have). The water at the top of the tank is still coming out piping hot, but what has happened is the hot water in the tank has all just "moved up a bit" and at the bottom replaced by cold. As soon as the hot / cold transition gets above that lower thermostat pocket, the ASHP thinks the tank is cold and fires up, and I am there shouting at it saying why the b****y hell do you want to come on? If I were designing this system again, I would specify a whole row of thermostat pockets up the tank, and I would specify an extra tank tapping near the bottom of the tank, not far above the cold inlet tapping, and I would have a circulating pump that could come on to stir up the hot water in the tank to even it;s temperature out a bit, and hopefully avoid the ASHP coming on when not really needed. but I can't see a way to retro fit that with no tank tapping low down to circulate the water to.
    3 points
  36. lots of people have a qualification, unfortunately that doesn't mean they are at the top of their game, nor even competent in that profession.
    3 points
  37. Attached is a rather long description of the ground source heatpump that I built at the end of 2021. It's completely diy - two 2nd hand fridge compressors(one for vacuuming down, one for the HP itself), bits of bent copper pipe, etc. I've encapsulated it as a pdf so that it hangs together in one thread, and should be an easier read. Thanks buildhub for a big filesize limit! I started out knowing vaguely what I wanted to do, then watching every youtube on R290 compressor systems several times, googling it, reading stuff on "Ecorenovator" etc. The youtubes are especially useful, watching people do things right - or wrong! I've been quite nervous about the safety aspect of R290 (propane) as the working fluid, and anybody who tries anything like this should be too. Propane is a great working fluid - it's not an F-gas, it has a GBW of 3, while most F-gasses are 1000+. But it burns well, so must be treated with great respect - used outside and kept away from flames and electrics. It was quite a steep learning curve - I'm ok at soldering copper pipes for plumbing, and regular electrics, but there was a lot to learn to make it work. Which it does, and we are happy with it - Mrs RobL doesn't accept any low temperatures in this house! There have been minor niggles (a fuse blew, lots of weeping compression joints in the water circuit before I watched a youtube on how to do them right). All the issues have been easy to fix, and I'm comfortable with the idea that I can fix them rather than wait for somebody else. DIY-GSHP-RobL-June2022.pdf
    3 points
  38. What horse shit.... I designed something no architect was able to give me which is what I want and a way I want to build it. I brought it to an architect( award winning) who is a relative of a good friend to put into planning and BC drawings and to ensure I wasn't missing anything and he reckoned he wouldn't change a thing Where most Architects fail is they are more interested in what they like and disregard their client opinions as inferior... hence alot of self builders treat them with less than the respect good ones deserve... P.s I'm a big fan of good architects and if plot was different or I wasn't in the game and had such a clear vision I would definitely have used one.
    3 points
  39. hi i've got the luxpower 3.6 with pylontech batteries works fine i turned off the chinese internet port. and i just access it locally. so if solar prediction from the met office API is low, medium or high for my home's needs, it'll charge the batteries high, medium or low, on the off peak from Bulb ev tariff. the luxpower then during the day does everything it can to prevent importing from the grid. it's got a CT clamp on the CU tails, and knows when the grid is importing/feeding in and it tries to invert as much as it can from solar and/or battery to feed the loads instead of pulling from the grid. when the loads calm down, the inverter calsm down to. within a second or two. it's pretty good
    3 points
  40. I had a few spare minutes on this lovely sunny Sunday evening and decided to spend it writing up a blog post for our basement UFH install and screed. We have a 250mm reinforced concrete slab sitting on top of 200mm EPS300 in the basement. The slab wasn’t very flat and so we decided to use a cement based liquid screed to give us a nice level base for our finished flooring. So we put down 25mm of PIR to level things out and also to allow the UFH pipes to be stapled to. I did some quick maths and I figured out that it was cheaper to use the 25mm PIR and UFH pipe staples than to use pipe clips fastened to the slab and a thicker layer of liquid screed and so an order was placed with our BM and it was delivered and fitted by my lovely wife and me. We found this is a pretty easy task to be honest and only found we had to put a small bit of sand blinding to level a couple of dips in one room. In the rest of the basement the PIR just took the bumps of the slab out. We taped the joints and foamed around the edges for a belt and braces approach even though there was a DPM going on top. Next came the DPM layer. We found this a bit of a pain to do! Not hard but trying to smooth it out and keep it square so that a constant amount was taken up the walls was just fiddly. In the end we got the laser level out and set it about 150mm above screed finished level and then used that to ensure we had enough DPM up the walls. Then we had to tape it to the walls but soon found that standard gaffa didn’t stick to the concrete walls nor the dense concrete blocks! We painted the concrete with a PVA mixture and that helped a lot for that but just didn’t work on the concrete blocks at all. Off to Google and this awesome forum and I eventually found Gorilla Tape which sticks well to concrete blocks and we were off and running! Following this we laid the UFH pipes. This was a job we actually really enjoyed. It was very satisfying creating those wonderful spiral shapes. We made some spacers and I was laying the pipe according to the layout designed by Wunda and my wife was walking behind with the stapler ‘kerchunking’ down the staples as we went. At the end it looked so good we were sad to think all our hard work would be covered up and never to be seen again. This was my first time running UFH pipes and also my first manifold fitting and I was very happy with how the manifold turned out. I filled the pipes with water and the pressure gauge showed that there were no leaks. That and the fact there water wasn’t pissing out anywhere! With the liquid screed booked in we needed to get a move on and get everything finished off and ready. The last stretch was to fit the temperature probes, perimeter expansion strip and create the expansion joints for crack mitigation at the doorways. Thanks to advice from this forum’s users I ran the temperature probes in UFH pipe with the end crimped down so as to not allow screed in just in case they need replacing in the future. I got the expansion strip from uHeat on eBay. It came with a plastic skirt and adhesive already attached so it was a real breeze to fit. Not much more to say about that The final thing was crack mitigation strips for between the doorways. After speaking to the screeder I decided to use 5.5mm plywood board. It was an inexpensive and simple solution. I was asked to cut them to size but leave them to the side of the doorways and the screeders would add them as they went around. Obviously I had to put them in place first to ensure I got the sizes right! So here are photos of our basement ready for the liquid screeders. On the day of the screed they turned up early before the screed lorry to setup their pump and check on my prep work. They said it was exemplary and that I wouldn’t believe the state of the prep work of some of the jobs they turned up to! They had absolutely nothing to do to the prep work which made them happy and made me happy that all our hard work was worth it. They put down their little tripod level thingies and waited for the screed to turn up. Once it did it was really quick work and very impressive. If it wasn’t for the fact that they ordered 6.4m3 of screed but the company only sent 6m3 they’d have been done in a few hours but, as it was, they ended up having to wait a good 2 or 3 hours for the last little bit of screed to turn up. They were not happy as, in the end, they had to spend the whole day here when they could’ve been on to the next job. But, at the end of the day we had a wonderfully flat looking basement floor. And 48hrs later we were walking on it. 🙂 All in all very happy with the whole process and I will be getting these guys back in to do our ground floor screed. thanks for reading.
    3 points
  41. So after 2 years since the planning permission was granted, and a 2month delay from the builders I'm finally underway on what will be the last major building work on this bungalow. Having real trouble finding a joiner who's available to do the roof, so I may end up having to do that myself. The one bit i'm unsure on having never done a lean-to roof before, the wood plate which goes on the wall, is it fixed using thunderbolts?
    2 points
  42. All finished now. And an animated MQTT dash info panel showing the Joule bucket filling and emptying: screen-20220613-135047.mp4 In the final configuration the Black box with the CT clamp goes next to the Electricity supply meter and has no external indicators or controls. Everything is done via MQTT over WiFi (where the power measurements are broadcast) and via real-time X10 style signalling to tag 'cycles to divert' on the mains wiring around the house. The Heatsink box goes in the airing cupboard next to the hot water cylinder and has a single LED showing green (standby) yellow (Joule bucket filling) red (Joule bucket emptying). All told very satisfying and at a materials cost of under £30 (many parts already lying around) quite a saving on buying an eddi/harvi combo. But I don't want to add up all the hours spent building it!
    2 points
  43. Yes i went in for planning permission for a basement that was the full size of the house above. with a decent sized lightwell to the rear. The reason for the basement was because i'm in Greenbelt and i knew that there was no way to go bigger on the house. Just got it through. I'll do some reading re the above advice. Thanks folks. I am pleased that i have managed to go from about 650 square ft to 3881 square ft + a double garage, and my posh shed. So about 4450 square ft in total. Ive had A and E permitted development rights removed. A i can understand but E is a right cheek. I will try and post up my floorplans, so you can all pull them apart.
    2 points
  44. yes, but you don't 'need' as much as at ground level. Have a read of this post for more details as to how depth underground effects U-values: also there are other threads in the basement forum on this subject. e g. 2 methods for a habitable space, yes. we used waterproof concrete AND waterproof membrane. details in our blog: we also have a land drain around the base of the basement going to a sump. very much belt and braces here. we used formwork and poured reinforce concrete but you can also use ICF and @pocster used another form of blockwork that he DIY'd but can't remember the name of it. yep, saniflo basically. or you could go to great expense and have a very deep waste pumping station externally. the basement sub-forum of this website! 😉 make provisions for utilities to come in to the basement if you're having a plant room down there.
    2 points
  45. Like the above but I am going to have to suggest a slide for the kids …. Just build a decent landing zone ..!!!
    2 points
  46. Umm, electromagnetic waves are very different to sound waves. Sound is pressure pulses and absolutely will sneak through tiny gaps.
    2 points
  47. As @joe90 says, a cantilever supported solely on your side has to be the best option. Gutter can be built into the structure so no leading or other flashing required on the neighbours wall. No pillars or post to get in the way.
    2 points
  48. @pocster Nah they all live down in the dungeon. The 48V on PoE is useful though as 5V sex toys tend to be a bit meh.
    2 points
  49. @SuperPav, Mesh selection is really a choice for your SE or whoever did your slab design and it is driven by that. Using the mesh as a placement framework for the UFH piping is really a secondary bonus and shouldn't impact on mesh selection. As to slab heating, there are broadly two strategies at the extreme: Dump heat into the slab at a steady rate so that the slab remains at a slight Δt above room temp. Here it will radiate ~ 7 ×Δt × A W into the interior. If this matches the net heat loss of the house, then your house will stay at the set temperature. Calculate your total kWh house losses for the coming day, and for a given input heating rate this give a total heating time. Just dump this into the slab in one or more "chunks", and accept that this will result in a slight ripple (say under 1°C) on your internal temperature. We have a passive house and have adopted the latter as this was easier to implement, in terms of kit required, ease of control, and simplicity leading to maintenance risks and reduction. The thermal dynamics here is a different Q entirely and one where I feel more qualified to answer on. I did my slab design back in 2015, and I was one of the first ones on this forum to go with a UFH solution which went against the prevailing wisdom of including a buffer tank. I decided to use a 3 kW Willis heater to heat the slab directly and use it as the thermal store for the heat. I needed to do some modelling of the slab for me to be comfortable with this solution and to ensure that it's thermal performance during the heating cycle was well within sensible limits, before finalising on this implementation. Luckily my professional background give me some experience of doing this type of modelling, but the main challenge was one of producing a model of the correct simplicity yet enough detail for the exercise to be meaningful. I have previously documented this in my blog posts and and specifically in my thread, Modelling the "Chunk" Heating of a Passive Slab written in late 2016. For the modelling, I didn't want to get into the complexities of CUDA compute engines and CFD libraries, so to keep the math and computation simple enough to be computable in Fortran on a single core (which is what I used back in the 1980s when I did this sort modelling for a living), I approximated the slab heated by one UFH loop as a (radially symmetric) concrete pipe some 0.120m in diameter and 100m long with a 15mm heating pipe running down its centre and with water circulating through it and heated by a 1 kW element before return. This allowed me to use a simple radial approximation for the Fourier heat equation and to solve over time for the (r, l, t) coordinates over time and the length of the pipe. (See this post for more details.) OK, it's a model and an approximate one at that because the actual heat flow through the pipe is not radially symmetric as the area around the heating pipe is insulated below, radiating to the air above, and adjacent to another. Even so, this did allow me to investigate the overall varying heating characteristics over time and both along and across the concrete. This was good enough to confirm that a "Willis direct into slab" approach would work fine for me. I subsequently instrumented the actual implementation with lots of DS18B20 digital thermometers which have been continuously logging now for ~5 years, and the slab behaves as predicted. This can be summarised by more simple and intuitive approximation. The slab surrounding a single pipe heating loop can be thought of a (folded) long box of concrete that is insulated below, radiating to the air above and with similar boxes on either side (since these are being heated by a return run at a similar flow temperature). The UFH pipe flow is dumps ~1kW (in my case) heat along the centre of this long box, and so the water cools as it flows along the pipe. The overall Δt is largely dictated by the water flow rate which in turn depends on the pump head, flow resistance, etc. In my case this was the biggest difference between the model and actual implementation, as I went with a slower flow rate than my modelled 1 m/s, in order to keep the circulation noise to a minimum. (The UFH is in a services cupboard off or G/F toilet and I don't like to hear the pump noise when I am taking a dump). So as the long "box" heats you get a standard radial heat flow curve where the circulating water in the middle is maybe 5°C hotter than the surface during heating period, with maybe a 2-3°C drop along the 100m run length. As the heat is dumped into the slab, it slowly but steadily heats up over the heating period, say by 5°C or so over a 7hr heating window. Certainly if you walk over the slab at the end of a heating cycle in bare feet (as we do), you can notice the 1-2 °C variation across the floor between the flow and return legs of the UFH runs and any gaps in UFH coverage. Pretty much as soon as the heating stops, the heat from the warm spots spreads so the feel becomes more uniform (as the heat only needs to flow ~50mm or so through the concrete). We heat our slab overnight, so by midnight the slab might be ½-1 °C below room temperature. In the morning after heating it might be 4°C above room temp, and it is now radiating ~28 W/m2 into the environment. This rate will fall during the day as the slab cools, leading (in our case) to a ~1°C ripple on the overall air temperature. The integrated heat dump from the slab must match the overall house losses, so the colder it is the more we need to heat the slab; and the warmer, the less. I hope this makes sense.
    2 points
  50. I think anyone doing a knock down and rebuild should perhaps propose the knock down as mitigation on the grounds the overall project will be neutral. Apply for the condition to be discharged and appeal if it isn't. If they refuse to process it Appeal for non determination. If you don't get a response to the application to discharge there is a "deemed consent" procedure. Will be important to follow the timescales allowed. Others with conditions.. There are a lot of rules the planners must follow when imposing conditions. Some make conditions unenforceable, such as those that cannot be met or require you to use third party land. If the problem can only be solved by the water companies I suspect you could argue that what the planners want you to do is unenforceable. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/use-of-planning-conditions Perhaps a group of you could get together and hire a planning consultant to try and find a common procedural way around it.
    2 points
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