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  1. not just imagination but perhaps, with a few exceptions, also: moral fibre / creativity / intellectual capacity / any interest in or empathy with the people they are supposed to be serving / leadership skills / negotiation skills / emotional intelligence / persuasion capabilities / sense of economic reality / ability to share and adhere to the truth - shall I go on?
    5 points
  2. I have been painting for nearly 20 years, started out with a cheap gun and some white Hammerite to see what I could do and slowly progressed from there. In the early days a very friendly, former painter turned paint salesman gave me a lot of guidance on paints and how to work with them and the actual painting bit was just time and practise. The first thing is prep, doesn’t matter what I am going to paint I always clean the whole lot with thinners/panel prep (thinners is better unless over 1K paints, but by that stage you shouldn’t be needing to degrease). Ban all silicone procuts from the area, even silicone sealant when off-gassing can contaminate a panel and cause it to fish-eye. After that I sand, if you sand greasy or contaminated substrates you are only spreading the contamination and pushing it into the scores created by the sanding. Scotch pads are fine for giving a generally good condition item, painted or not a rub down. The rest of the time I would use a combination of what is needed for the surface could be bad, 80 grit then 120 then 240 etc. Maybe just a light 400. Once clean degrease with clean lint-free cloths and thinners – keep using clean bits until you can see the panel is actually clean. You will be surprised. For Something like a kitchen door I would hit with a 240 grit random orbital for a nice keyed flat finish, I might go up to 400 but doubt it. Gun setup is a skill in itself, a gravity fed cup gun would be best, there are quite a few settings. First thing I do is wind the air control in until it is very low, then wind it out till I get what I know to be right, difficult to explain, but you want it to carry the paint in a fine mist, but not so much air that you create a dust cloud, you can actually paint with low air volume but it’s not great for the finish as the mist is not fine enough. The other setting is paint volume, you need to wind this in quite a bit so that when you pull the trigger 100% you don’t just shoot heaps or paint, I use trigger control to initially do my light mist blow in, then more trigger for the final coats. You also have a pattern control, narrow is great for very lightly blowing in an awkward bit or an edge but must be used carefully so I advise any novice painter not to. Go for about a 4-6” pattern. You can also control the pattern angle by rotating the front air cap, I always set my gun up with the spray pattern fan sitting vertical, so as I hold the gun naturally and pass over a panel side to side the paint is hitting the panel wide, if you set it the other way and go side to side you will cause runs and is only really good for painting tall things you cannot move so you are going up and down. As you move the gun keep it back about a foot from the panel and when you move keep the gun at the same distance to the panel, people often swing the gun resulting in the mid-point being close to the panel and the outer of the swing being further back which changes so many variables as you go that you will notice it on the paint. Start painting furthest away from you, this means if anything falls from your overall-clothes you get the chance to blow it off (pull the trigger enough to get air, but no paint). For paint volumes for an average kitchen door, depending on paint, you would want about 30-40ml – for your first rodeo have a little extra to allow for some waste, but don’t be tempted to get it all on the door, its paint not plaster! A thin film of well adhered paint is all you need as long as you cannot see any shadowing or bleed through from primer which is why it is a good idea to use the right primer for the job, for light colours, like white, I like an offwhite or beige primer, white primer for white topcoat is bad because you cannot always see what is primer and what is topcoat and may miss bits. I would then use a 1k primer or filler primer for these doors, I would however need to check adhesion of the primer on the melamine because you might need to use a plastic primer or get a direct adhesion primer. Do some tests, I’d use a dab of primer from the can onto the door and leave it for min. 36 hours, then use your fingernail to see how well it adhered, do not panic if fresh paint just comes off, the chemical adhesion is not good until full cure which is why new paint is so delicate. The primer is the easiest to work with because it tends to lay down nicely and has good coverage so your not tempted to overpaint it. I use a 1.2mm nozzle for primer and mist it on finely to get the initial bond, round the edges or any tricky bits first, then the top (face of door), cross the panel across the shorter length and keep the paint flowing as you start and finish on the panel, overlay it a little, then lay it on in 2 slightly heavier coats after that tacks up and flashes off. If the primer starts to look quite glossy while you’re putting it on, you are putting on too much too soon, it should only ever look sort of satin/med gloss which is about right, matt is even better but that is very thin fast flash off territory. You can leave primer for a while if you want, but once primer appears dry you can move on, depends what I am doing will depend if I flatten it, if the prep was good then the primer will look good and so will the next coat(s). I use IR lamps to speed things up but the garage door open on a summer days with air moving will have it touch dry within 20-40minutes. I am assuming you will use a solid 2K colour, if not, apply basecoat with similar technique to primer, then treat your 2k lacquer as the following. If the primer is perfect, I just move on. 2K paint is almost always 2 paint to 1 hardner and then I use about 10% thinners, if painting the doors on the flat I would paint them with 10-15% thinners. I use a 1.2mm or 1.4mm nozzle for 2K. Hit the doors edges first quickly with a light coat, then proceed across the door, same as primer really, let that tack, you should still be able to see primer after this coat, it is just a mist, then come across with the gun flowing at a higher volume of paint (I use trigger control but you can wind the pin in or out to control volume) keep the spray pattern wide for a novice as less chances of runs. After the first coast back off and wait, look across the garden or think about something else, even be tempted to hang the gun up, walk away, take your mask off and just look at something else for 1-2 minutes because human nature is to keep blasting on paint, there really is no rush. Now add another coat. Once the panel is basically fully covered and looks “done” tip your paint back into your mixing cup and add a dash more thinners, swirl that up and tip back into your gun, on a high volume spray and wide pattern, mist the whole panel with over lap briskly (but not too fast) from side to side, the extra thinned paint will land on the existing coats, the solvent will help to level the paint and you should, if you get it right, be left with a really really smooth and if gloss paint, really really glossy finish. However, be very careful, too narrow a spray pattern or too slow and you will cause a run at this stage. If when you think you are done the panel looks dry or matt, its not “wet” enough. You need more paint on it, that will dry as orange peel. I have intentionally created a textured or “dry” finish before and that is lots of paint, wide pattern, lots of air and too far back, result can be almost chalky with the right paint, not good for kitchen cabinets! If it looks dry, get another pass on it with higher paint flow, even if you have run out of paint, go quickly mix up enough for 1 more pass and you will be fine. Have a bright light or torch handy, when you’re done, shine it over the panel looking for dry bits or bits that are a bit thin, quickly just mist over that whole bit again once the last coat has tacked a bit, 2-3 minutes. Now, screw ups. If you make a mistake on primer, don’t worry, it just means you will need to flatten it, let it cure well (too soon it will bog down and clog the paper or peel/rub off), and then 1200 it to remove specks or runs, flatten it and blend it all, you should not need to blow in more primer if you are careful. If you make a mistake on 2k, don’t panic either. Just leave it, do not even think about trying to rectify it at this stage. Walk away and clean your gun. After about 12 hours you can take water and 1200 or 2400 grit to 2k no bother, dampen it down, little block and sand out any runs or imperfections, always use a block or your fingers might cause the paper to rub through the paint. Once the defect has gone you can use Farecla rubbing compound (basically like a very fine sand paper) followed by Farecla finishing compound (Halfords do their own version in little tubes too) OR you can lightly rubdown the whole panel/door etc. and hit with a very fine, 20-25% thinned 2K and just mist it on to refinish the door. H&S – 2k paint hardener contains isocyanides and 2K will set like jelly, if you breath it in you end up with that in your lungs, you may fall over and end up in a very bad way, some people cannot cope with it at all. So, you need to take care. They recommend you wear an airfed mask, but I use a full face cover 2M mask with FPP3 filters over organic/inorganic gas and vapour filters which will cover all the nasties. When wearing the mask, I cannot even smell the paint. Make sure you spec your mask up with the right filters. Not sure what you mean by radioactive style, radioactive protection is just dust protection so you don’t breath in radioactive particles, for painting 2K you actually need higher protection believe it or not. I would also consider painting outside on a slightly breezy day, this does bring with it issues though, but I quite often paint outside, I painted outside at the weekend and didn’t get a single bit of dust or anything stuck in the paint, if outside conditions are not good I paint in my garage, I raise the door about 2 feet and have plywood boards with huge car fans mounted in them, then get jammed in to extract from floor level, I then open the side door, with the fans running I can sand and paint in the garage and there is not even so much as a hint of a haze in the garage, I still of course wear the mask. Also wear gloves at all times and ideally lint-free long sleeves because the paint landing on your skin can be absorbed. These H&S tips are not perfect, but it works for me. I would get your gun setup with some cheap thinned emulsion and practise, practise the spray pattern adjustment, practise the air volume and the paint volume (pin) control. Anything else, key to your painting, just ask.
    5 points
  3. I will counter the above with my positive results with a modern well insulated house and an ASHP. The annual electricity used by the ASHP to heat the house is £400 at todays high electricity price, but it would not be a lot cheaper if we had mains gas available (we don't) Factor in the gas standing charge and they would be about the same. Fuel costs of all types is rising quickly, so the best thing you can do whatever heat source you choose is insulate the building to death and make it air tight with an MVHR ventilation system. And install wet under floor heating so if you do choose a gas boiler now, you can easily swap to an ASHP at a later date. AS much PV as your roof will take or as much as your DNO will allow. Then having an ASHP makes it easier to self use more of the PV you generate. If you do choose gas, choose a system boiler with an unvented hot water tank. That will allow you to dump surplus PV not being used to hot water. The very worst thing you could choose is a combi boiler.
    5 points
  4. Highly recommended. we don't have one on what is effectively a £400k job. My pet subject. In my business we allocated a fixed, and low, number of skips, but also had a plan for what could go in them and what to do with the rest. On occasions I had skips emptied and refilled properly: Air is very expensive to cart to tip and pay landfill on, and the skip companies make a lot by sorting and consolidating. Site manager had to fill in a form of approximate contents.....so it became easier to think rather than dump. A couple of examples of savings. A few contractors really bought into this, and I once found our electrician's boss flattening lighting boxes and tying them up neatly, reducing volume by 90%...he then took them to a recycling centre. Another company MD (we were in a waste reduction group) banned skips on a house project and used hippo bags, allocated to different products. His surprise saving was in battens. Prior to this the roofers got to the eaves and sawed off the timber , and it fell to ground then was skipped. With Hippo bags they didn't fit so might as well take them up and reuse as cut to put in the bag. Similarly, a bag full of half bricks is fairly obvious and unjustifiable. Damaged bricks can obv be hardcore. In a skip they disappear. In our study we found that the cost of a skip is not £300 or whatever, but about £2,000 when you included materials that were being dumped without thought , or shouldn't have been bought in the first place. Timber packaging from steel deliveries we gave to schools for woodwork if we hadn't used it for shuttering. The big contractors claimed and boasted of 'zero waste'. But it wasn't true....they defined zero as 'what couldn't reasonably be recycled'.
    4 points
  5. All the various predictions at the moment are entirely based by taking the current wholesale price of gas and electricity and extrapolating it forwards. Whilst this is fine in the short term, it has little predictive power in the longer term. The price of gas has doubled since early June, hence the massive recent increase in predictions for the next energy cap and the one in January which would see the full effect of recent increases. Predictions from just three or four months ago were wildly wrong. Forecasts of a similar price next winter are worthless, considering the price of gas has doubled in two months it could as easily double again or fall by 50%. I am getting somewhat annoyed that politicians are not being honest about what is going on. This is almost 100% due to the war in Ukraine and sanctions against Russia. Russia has retaliated by massively reducing the gas supply. Astonishingly the price of gas has gone up so much that Europe is giving more money to Russia than ever. Indeed the correct way to hurt the producer of a commodity is to increase supply and reduce use so that the price of the commodity falls. We have managed to achieve the opposite effect. We are basically having an economic war with Russia. There were some articles in the papers about it last week. The Russians think that we will give up before they run out of the ability to fight Ukraine. I think people are hardier than they realise, but telling them honestly what is happening would help a lot. I find it quite bizarre that the Daily Mail etc blame this on renewables which actually are helping the situation. That electricity from the new Hinkley station will also be looking a lot better value than originally. Gas is a more regional commodity than oil and because so much of it is used for domestic heating in Europe, it also has less elastic demand. Thus the producers are in a much more powerful position than they are with oil, where substitution and buying it from elsewhere are easier. Basically it is a lot easier not to drive than it is not to turn on your heating and gas boilers don't have any alternative in the short run. Anyway we have got ourselves in a very difficult situation I am in the fortunate position that I have an efficient house and I can afford the increases. Some people are going to be wiped out by this. It is not easy for the government to do anything about it. They would basically have to borrow money to pay people's energy bills. With almost 28m UK households, it would cost over £30bn a year to stop bills going up more. They were supposed to be looking at the pricing of electricity as fixed cost producers are coining in at the moment. I guess the windfall tax is an easy way to capture this. The price of gas, however, is simply driven by the rising price of gas. The long term solution is more renewables and more insulation. The short term solution is the end of the war, something that I wouldn't begin to try and predict.
    4 points
  6. Bin it, too many reasons for me to type on my phone….
    4 points
  7. Go Gas Boiler with PV - but with a caveat. I'll give you my thoughts based on my personal home situation and my professional observations (we have the gas/ASHP/PV/Sunamp debate for new buildings weekly). I have PV and a gas boiler, the boiler is relatively cheap to run, its not even a year old (I made the call to replace with gas and not go ASHP last Feb). On a crisp bright winters days I can also heat some space I am using with some small electric heaters, for free if I want. For example I am looking at electric UFH for the bathroom and adding an electric option to my office and maybe loft room so I can make use of day time sun for heat in the room I occupy most, I can whittle away at my energy import and balance things out a bit through the year. I then have the gas boiler for the simple hot water production and on demand space heating when needed. I am currently working on building services designs for a 4 residential developments ranging from 7 storey flatted development in London to smaller blocks of flats in Glasgow and a house, some will be gas boilers with a PV allowance per house, some will be ASHP some will be Sunamp's charged straight off the grid. When looking at heat loss for these flats or houses and the heating method we cringe at the cost some of them will cost to heat. The fact is electricity is expensive, things like ASHP's are expensive the whole lot will just be painful until electricity becomes cheap to produce nationally/globally. If it was me building from new, I would stick a gas boiler in, a hot water cylinder with a water coil and element fed from PV, more PV than I need, and electric heating options in various spaces, I would spend a bit more on insulation and try and create a building which needs little heat. I would leave in allowance in space and technical spec for more PV and battery storage when prices come down and my long term plan would be to lose the gas boiler, well, if that is the way things go, maybe we will see an alternative gas supply and boilers to suit, in which case I will be pleased I have the gas infrastructure. My thinking is that this will give me green credentials and cheap electricity to use however I wish, but the low capital cost of a has CH system but with options further down the line. If I go ASHP now, then to my mind, I have just signed away a lot of money on technology the industry is frankly still having trouble with, I also diversify my energy sources, I do think we are going to see more energy issues in the coming years, it could be gas or electricity shortages or sever price hikes. If you had told Germans 2-3 years ago, look boys you might run out of gas and struggle to keep the heat on most would have laughed, it is very real now. Which is why I am keeping my options open, it is why I have a diesel and a petrol car, at present my petrol is cheaper to run as Petrol is 20p a litre cheaper round here and my Petrol & Diesel get almost the same MPG. Spend some of the ASHP money on future proofing, make allowances for things you might install so you are sitting pretty and can, if you want, when technology and prices improve and maybe electric costs stabilise, go ASHP in the future. High temp versions are coming through now that will work as a direct replacement to a gas boiler without rad changes, maybe even increase panel size so that come slightly lower temps you still have good heating from them.
    4 points
  8. From recent tv interviews, if Gordon Brown was on the list, he would get my vote. I never thought I would say something like that.
    3 points
  9. The average numbers, which are good enough for most things, are here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/information-consumers/energy-advice-households/check-if-energy-price-cap-affects-you These are the Typical Domestic Consumption Values which OFGEM use to get to £1971 etc, and their 3 levels. https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/sites/default/files/docs/2020/01/tdcvs_2020_decision_letter_0.pdf They still seem to be using the 'current' ones for the Price Cap. Our media, being useless plank-like scaremongering morons, use the middle number and pretend it applies to everyone. eg .28*3100+.45*365+.27*365+.07*12000 = 1970.8.
    3 points
  10. This has the makings of a good / timely discussion. My wife describes me as the master of access panels but not in the sense that they look any good but rather that they are everywhere! I have this drive to ensure I can get at everything that might need or facilitate servicing, upgrade, the back of the bath / shower valve top and bottom of risers and these all appear in the walls - and she hates them all. On the build I am doing all I can to get them into places where they don't show in the room EG into Wardrobes, behind vanity units, covered by removable panelling. So any other ideas will be gratefully accepted round here.
    3 points
  11. Why not fence it like opposite and plant a hedge inside eventually you can trim it to the height you want, slowly slowly it will grow and people will get used to it. Saves all this fighting 🤷‍♂️. Frankly a panel fence will either get graffiti on it or get holes punched in it, or both. Difficult to damage a hedge over a picket fence.
    3 points
  12. Open fireplaces are very inefficient and a permenant draft, no a wood stove can be fitted without removing all that stone work (some work required within the “throat”).
    3 points
  13. Contaminated with what would be my first question, then see if that could be treated. A small scale take on a slowsan filter or UV or what not. If there is an existing mains supply locally, then this could possibly be used to feed a potable water buffer tank(s) with booster which could be filled say over night every night (timed pump/level circuit). We do a lot of stored boosted water for flatted developments, A to boost pressure and B where water supplier are not happy about the new connection capacity requirement. We have a small block of 12 flats where the water mains is existing and undersized, a small tank room and a booster pump has solved this. It may not work for many many reasons, but I am sure a system could be had to provide potable water for <150K. Could the existing supply be upgraded cheaper? Friends upgraded a 250m supply to their house with the use of a mole to run new line, worked out quite cheap, another friend with a farm had a new line pulled in through his existing line with a splitter mole which is pulled by a draw wire through the existing pipe and splits it as it goes pulling behind it the new line.
    2 points
  14. There are issues with oversizing. The modulation range of the heat of pump, usually about 2.5:1 This is not an issue when at the lowest temperature outdoors, but becomes apparent when the outside air temp is in the 5 to 10 degC range. At 11 degC outside your heat demand is half your design case, so about 3kW. If your heat pump cannot modulate to that level, you then need a buffer added to the system.
    2 points
  15. At first it was the US electing Trump that started me thinking: what wheels have fallen off to get us into this dreadful place. Then after a few more bits of undercarriage fell off in the UK, it struck me how just much bullshit was backed-up and how it was now being liberally spayed around the world. If bullshit is allowed to go unchecked, nature has a way of making the consequences felt (eventually) even if people are too far up their own arses to notice or care. Much like how water has a way of introducing a dose of reality despite your plumber or roofer's bullshit. Climate change, Brexit, Ukraine and even Covid can all be seen clearly through this lens.
    2 points
  16. Just grab the bull by the horns, and tell your installer the "problem" is yours, not theirs. Conversation over, nobody gets hurt
    2 points
  17. Time and again when serious problems like this come along the government appears to be seriously lacking in imagination.
    2 points
  18. Could it be to make the tube long enough that a small hand/arm cannot get up the tube when the fan is running? Might be a safety through distance thing. I see no reason technically why not.
    2 points
  19. Ouch. Talking to a New York based expat today, and he is expecting a 6k energy bill that he is paying out of the rent for his house in London. If you are paying the bills, then I'd say that you should keep the £400 and the £150, to count against a bit of the blank cheque in possession of your tenants. But ranting heads (ie TV company correspondents) on the TV are saying watch out for dodgy landlords who pay the bills trying to keep the refund. All of them - planks. The only defence is an ultra-efficient house.
    2 points
  20. That 5” flue isn’t useable - it’s sealed with duct tape, makes me think it was put in for ventilation not a stove. Whole of the top of that stack needs coming off including neighbours side - it looks loose and will have been leaking for a while. You also need to get someone who understands how these stacks were built to look at that opening brickwork - blocks look new and very odd ..! Don’t forget your stove also needs a minimum 250mm all round so the sizes need to be checked.
    2 points
  21. Fair enough. Have you already got this pre-plumbed cylinder? If so my thought now is run it with the simplest heating-only design you can, per LA3222, and if come next summer you have issues requiring active cooling do it properly and install a2a unit(s) upstairs. They're very plausible to retrofit
    2 points
  22. Google and download the GSE Configurator tool - I have it here but cannot attach to the post. Find your panel size, then use the GSE configurator to produce a full spec/shopping list. Very good and makes it dead simple. I used it for spec'ing my in-roof system.
    2 points
  23. Get a full kit from the likes of mid summer whoesale or ITS. The in roof trays (GSE) take a bit of figuring out to get started (location of the battens is key) but fairly straightforward. If you can do the physical install yourselves, any electrician should be able to wire the panels to the inverter etc.
    2 points
  24. Cut the tarmac nice and neatly and sand / cement bed a soldier course or 2 of the paving blocks on the concrete.
    2 points
  25. Mechanically, no, it hasnt changed much. Electronically, its a huge leap. Which has left a lot of them behind. And, to be completely honest, me to a certain extent. I ran an automotive workshop for 13 years. Even in that space of time, the developments were significant. Your traditional automotive technician are mostly just guessing at problems. Usually at the customers expense. You say its releatively easy with diagnostics. Well, it would be if you have a grasp of how the car works. But they invariably dont. A really easy example. Car wont start and run. Diagnostic says crank sensor. So they change the sensor. Oddly, that doesnt fix it. So then they say, it must be the ECU. If allowed, they change that too. Of course, it was just the wiring to the sensor. But they simply cant grasp that the ecu is looking for a signal. If the loop isnt completed it falls over. Because the diagnostic says sensor, they change it. Zero comprehension. I would say more than 75% of sensor faults, were not the sensors. MAF sensor faults. I reckon 99% are air leaks. Hole in the pipe. If i had a pound for every sensor changed in the UK in a year i would be a millionaire. Of course, there are people that do understand it. But you wont find them working in a cold draughty shed covered in oil and dirt. They will have a "proper" job. I did manage to employ someone who was good at this, but his mechanical skills were hopeless. Problem was, i just didnt, nor ever would have, enough of that type work to justify such a person. In reality, most of the garages locally, when faced with a problem they didnt understand would take it to the one bloke locally who did. The guy is a legend, and has no doubt forgotton more than ill ever know. The mass of equipment he has is something else too! But he is one guy. He cant do everything. The lack of any actual solution to dealing with it is one of the reasons we closed the business in the end. There just isnt the people out there that understand. Accepted that im in the south east, and that makes the situation worse. But thats where a lot of people live. I see ASHP and related as much the same. You have traditional plumbers, who all of a sudden now need to understand a whole new area/technology. There will be smart ones who can and want to learn, and do. They will be very succesful. But they will be a small percentage. Thats not going to be enough to install these systems at any meaningful scale. But they will still be installed. Badly. By people who dont understand. I dont suggest i have the answers. Just an observation.
    2 points
  26. I can't speak of the technical programming of the heat pumps themselves, but I think there's a big difference between what should be done and what is done in the market. To design a heating system using a heatpump or a gas boiler is exactly the same process if you want a properly designed heating system. As follows: calculate heat loss calculate hot water demand calculate total heat demand size heat emitters based on design temperature drop of the system and flow/return temperatures select your heat emitters based on heat factor and pipework emissions (this also varies depending on radiator connections) calculate system flow rate including pressure drop and flow velocity size pipework and pump accordingly (with heatpumps this might include the buffer) The differences between your fossil fuel boiler and heatpump is largely the flow/return temps and temperature drop across the system (which can be managed using a buffer in heatpumps) and thus flow velocity and rate. Using this method it's a fairly simple process to future proof the heating system for upgrade to heatpump in the future. The problem as I see it is that most installers doing gas/oil, don't bother to do these calculations, using rules of thumb instead which can be totally random. But with these systems you can get away with it because you just chuck in a big engine. Not so with a heatpump. I reckon if we rejigged all the existing fossil fuel systems we'd manage to save well in excess of 15% of gas, if not a lot more and have decently heated houses. Talk in the industry appears to be edging towards hybrid heatpumps using small heatpumps added to existing fossil fuel boiler or new hybrid boilers as a transitional phase.
    2 points
  27. Plus the biggest washers you can find as plastic will just tear out over bolt heads if you don’t ..!
    2 points
  28. Generally right but I would take the board over the flanges to improve adhesion and reduce possibility of leaching or a potential crack line
    2 points
  29. Really? That cabinet should have been a wine chiller or beer fridge, or an overflow wine chiller or beer fridge. And why would you want to play such a cruel trick on a kitchen fitter? Plumber maybe...
    2 points
  30. We use a laser and put datum marks usually 1m above finished floor level around the buildings corners. . We then build the corners up to the desired height then run the walls in. You can get a bit of line sag on a long run so we usually tingle the line to a datum in the middle of a long run.
    2 points
  31. Can you build a replacement house adjacent to the existing and then demo the existing later? You would have somewhere to live then at lease during the build.
    2 points
  32. Interesting question! Depends on how significant the change is. We had a timber frame. If I wanted to move a doorway 400mm, it was sucking of teeth and back to the drawing board. If they'd somehow managed to omit an internal doorway in the frame, it was sorted on site same day... I think honest and open communication on both sides is key. Your builder needs to be upfront about the implications for him/her (including the impact on their other commitments), and then you can decide whether the change is worth the cost.
    2 points
  33. Just to say @ProDave kindly gave me a code for Octopus today. The website does look like they're not taking/are discouraging new customers. However if you click the "I know I want to save money, I want to switch anyway" you get through to the option to phone up. I phoned this afternoon, got through pretty quick and spoke to an extremely helpful & friendly agent. Call took about 15 mins all in including holding & a bit of chat. He was able to set me up over the phone - prices on the variable tariff basically the same as Shell (standing charge about 0.2p cheaper) as I'd expected. He also added the referral code to my account, worth £50 each for me and @ProDave so worth having! Less than an hour after dialling the number I've had the email to provide Octopus with closing meter readings so although the official switch isn't till next week I've used my last Shell-supplied units which feels brilliant 🤣
    2 points
  34. Steady on chap, some of us have not had breakfast yet.
    1 point
  35. if no need for achitect or se then most changes are done on a 'day rate' and paid for accordingly. if design changes then achitect will charge accordingly and builder will charge the same day rate to complete
    1 point
  36. If the light fitting was made with a 2 core flex without an earth core then it will be double insulated and not require an earth connection. There will usually be the square within a square symbol to show it is double insulated.
    1 point
  37. Just had a look, daily costs of around 40p mentioned, which is high. Carbon filter flowed by ION exchange resin and then a post filter. I am using a BWT AC002200 Combi Care Polyphosphate Scale Inhibitor. About £30 per year for a new cartridge. just installed it upstream of the boiler.
    1 point
  38. Check the price on 75mm too - it can be had some times for much less than the equivalent 100/50 setup.
    1 point
  39. https://ecclestons.com For EPS70. https://bmdgroup.co.uk/products/jablite-expanded-polystyrene-insulation-eps300 For EPS300 and other grades.
    1 point
  40. The PIR I got came direct from the factory, manufactured two days before. All the Rockwool came from a builders merchant just down the road, for a third the price of me going to builders merchant direct.
    1 point
  41. InsulationHub for me too, as cheap if not cheaper than the likes of SecondsAndCo.
    1 point
  42. Cemfloor say Pouring between 40mm and 50mm of liquid floor screed for underfloor heating is optimal. The diameter of the heating pipe is included in this depth. We are going for 50 as 40 doesn't allow much tolerance for any wobbles.
    1 point
  43. What screed are you going for? 50mm is generally considered the absolute minimum depth for a liquid screed, 65mm if using sand/cement.
    1 point
  44. So basically your threshold is about 230mm above the B&B floor? Take away insulation (150mm), and your left with about 80mm. Allow 20mm for flooring, anqother 10mm for error, and your down to 50mm. The key thing is the floor finish at the door threshold. 5mm lvt or 30mm limestone slabs?! That'll determine your screed finish level. You need to decide this yesterday. You normally do this on the reverse way, set your thresholds based on a set depth of insulation, screed and floor finishes.
    1 point
  45. Think you may have lost the plot, making a simple reliable ventilation system in to something it's not. Sounds like a recipe for failed ventilation system, that also does little or no cooling as the flow rates are way to low to be effective.
    1 point
  46. Yes, but he's a highly experienced builder and worked his arse off.
    1 point
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