cwr

Laser level recomendation

Recommended Posts

Hey folks,

 

I'm pondering whether I should buy a cheap laser level. Primarily for setting levels while on my own outside for sheds and out buildings, range of up to about 8m (I've borrowed an optical level, but this require 2 people).

I've no experience of these devices, so a few questions:

-Can a 'interior' rated level be used outside at all?

-Do the cheap detectors that can be bought for £30 on ebay detect the cheap internal lasers?

-Does anyone have any recommendations?  

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a Dewalt laser level a few months ago, can't recall the model number but it was a self levelling one, circa £80. Didn't really have a clear idea what I was going to use it for but it's invaluable: Checking up on shoddy window installation, running a line round the outside of the house so that the first floor cladding stopped at the same height all around, checking the dips and bumps in our power floated slab etc etc. 

 

No idea about the cheap detectors but I think I'm definitely in the market for the DeWalt detector that goes with my laser level.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Dewalt.

 

TIP:  If you are not using it for a while, take the batteries out.  Even when "off" it drains the batteries.  I only found this out after the second set of wasted flat batteries.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, cwr said:

-Can a 'interior' rated level be used outside at all?

 

A bit, but it's tricky. In bright sunshine they're pretty much useless but on a cloudy day they sort of work. It helps a lot to have something reflective https://edavies.me.uk/2016/03/laser-level/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are all hilti

100 mtr range 

While I wouldn’t buy one for a Occasional use

Most of the hire shops will hire Hilton or Rugby

The cheap ones are no good for setting out  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Ed Davies said:

 

A bit, but it's tricky. In bright sunshine they're pretty much useless but on a cloudy day they sort of work. It helps a lot to have something reflective https://edavies.me.uk/2016/03/laser-level/

You really need a rotary laser for setting out with a detector Preferably green beam  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used my Bosch GL80-3 outside to do my man-shed base. Best £360 I ever spent, and has earned its price umpteen times over. 

Outside in bright sunlight you can still see the beam but only if you use something to create some shade, and use a piece of white card / stiff paper as a background to see the beam. 

Dawn / dusk is best if you want to use a ‘domestic ‘ laser to set out, but I’d rather struggle with a domestic one that will be invaluable when the interior stuff starts.

The DeWalt one is very, very good value for money. 👌. Only 2 line though 😕

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Co-craft from Class Ohlson. Cross line, indoor/outdoor setting. Best £29.99 I've spent. 

 

20190921_172755

 

What it can't do is turn me into a tiler or brickie!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

got a cracking daylight green chinesium rotary. came with receiver, target etc. Very bright, very handy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Nickfromwales said:

I used my Bosch GL80-3 outside to do my man-shed base. Best £360 I ever spent, and has earned its price umpteen times over. 

[...]

 

Three years ago, I bought mine on Nick's recommendation. As described by Nick above, it has been very valuable.I bought the receiver that goes with it, and a staff.

 

A while a go, @nod came round to my place with his Hilti.  Its painted  bright red - and I painted myself green with envy. Difference is, he uses his every day, and I use mine - say - two or three times a week on average. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, AnonymousBosch said:

 

Three years ago, I bought mine on Nick's recommendation. As described by Nick above, it has been very valuable.I bought the receiver that goes with it, and a staff.

 

A while a go, @nod came round to my place with his Hilti.  Its painted  bright red - and I painted myself green with envy. Difference is, he uses his every day, and I use mine - say - two or three times a week on average. 

You can hire a full Hilti kit for about 50 quid I have numerous hilti line lasers But they are no good for outside 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Nickfromwales said:

Dawn / dusk is best if you want to use a ‘domestic ‘ laser to set out, but I’d rather struggle with a domestic one that will be invaluable when the interior stuff starts.

 

Exactly. You'll likely only have a few hours of setting out work to do so arranging to do it when the light's pretty dim is not really a problem.

 

13 hours ago, Nickfromwales said:

The DeWalt one is very, very good value for money. 👌. Only 2 line though 😕

 

Is that a horizontal and vertical line out of the front?

 

The Stanley I have has that plus a vertical line out of the side at 90° to the vertical line out of the front. I didn't see much use for that at first but recently I've used it a lot to get the sides of the openings for my Veluxes in the sloping roof in the right vertical plane, by aligning the side beam with the joists running down the length of the house. Got easier with practice but harder with more window fitted as the inside of the house is brighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the red tinted goggles that came with my first laser really help with making the line visible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, cwr said:

I've no experience of these devices, so a few questions:

 

 

Looking at the responses you seem to be getting feedback on two different types of laser.

 

The most common laser used outside on a building site is a rotating laser that does not paint a visible line and has a range +15m. These are cube in shape and about 10" across. Builders typically set them up in a fixed position on a tripod for most of the working day and then use a receiver on a staff to get levels. The old model I used just gave an audio sound and an lcd up/down display to indicator high or low. This is a single handed operation. Typical cost £400 to £600.

 

A much cheaper type of laser paints visible lines. At night on site my dewalt can cast a line to at least 25m but I only use it up to 10m. This is really an indoor laser hence I use it outside near sunset, in practice I only have 40 minutes between it first casting a legible line and the whole site getting too dark to stumble around looking at levels. Mine cost £135.

 

I would like to own both and serious outside building pros use the expensive rotating cube lasers. In practice I have got a lot of use from my indoor line laser outside. I check my blockwork heights every few courses and check how vertical a blockwork door aperture is. I have also learned how to check levels of things like poured concrete, drainage gradients and the level consistency of my block & beam floor. This requires using a 2x1 batten of wood, marking the position of the laser line on the wooden staff at a reference point and then wondering around site looking to see if the line is high or low against the reference mark. This again is a sunset operation. One downside of using a visible line laser for obtaining heights across a site is the limited angle of projection of the line, I would guess it is not much over 90 degrees.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ordered one of those - use code SUMMERCLAS for 10% discount and you get free delivery also 🙂

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Following this with interest. A few years ago, my electrician used one on a telescopic floor to ceiling pole. He left it with me for the weekend when I was setting out my kitchen. Brilliant. Pretty sure it was a deWalt. Made me realise very quickly that the walls in my house were built by somebody that was unfamiliar with spirit levels and plumb lines....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did purchase a spinny laser initially for foundations and stuff . Very hard to see the dot in daylight but had a beepy sensor handheld unit - beeped when inline .

All very expensive; so I bought a cheap eBay job straight from China . About a fifth of the cost - still works great now .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, pocster said:

I did purchase a spinny laser initially for foundations and stuff . Very hard to see the dot in daylight but had a beepy sensor handheld unit - beeped when inline .

All very expensive; so I bought a cheap eBay job straight from China . About a fifth of the cost - still works great now .

 

Ditto and I tested mind with a water level over 20m, it was spot on.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Vijay said:

 

Ditto and I tested mind with a water level over 20m, it was spot on.

I was getting ready to email eBay expecting it to be crap and get a refund . Worked really well . When my timber frame went up on the dwarf wall to support it the guy went “Wow! 2mm out - better than a professional “ . Have to be honest I laser checked every single block !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, pocster said:

I was getting ready to email eBay expecting it to be crap and get a refund . Worked really well . When my timber frame went up on the dwarf wall to support it the guy went “Wow! 2mm out - better than a professional “ . Have to be honest I laser checked every single block !

 

Should have just made up profile sticks. Set a datum point and then just use that stick to make sure you got every layer of bricks right. That's what I did when I built my garage years ago ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Vijay said:

 

Should have just made up profile sticks. Set a datum point and then just use that stick to make sure you got every layer of bricks right. That's what I did when I built my garage years ago ;)

Yeah but that requires skill . Listening for a beep and tapping a block down requires very very very very little skill ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now