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1 hour ago, Carrerahill said:

I know for a fact that a developer is currently installing 164 No, 305W Peak, solar panels on a building, connected to nothing. Reason being that the LA accepted their existence, but little do they know they don’t go anywhere. Why on earth I hear you ask, well what is the benefit to them? They saved £40,000 or something on the inverters, connection back to the MSB etc. etc. and the install time. If that is their attitude, why would they want to waste any money on things they can just slap in without design?

This is a BUILDING CONTROL fail for not checking they were not being hoodwinked.  Then having found this deception, crawled over every mm of every single house on the developments looking for other breaches of building regs.

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On 19/07/2021 at 13:43, richo106 said:

Ive been recommended to speak to Nu-Heat has anybody dealt with these?

Absolute total and utter garbage for designs and system principles. I wouldn't EVER go to them for a quote for UFH, not even for supply only. They made a proper mess of a £2m build and it cost a fortune trying to retrospectively delete all of their errors in a nearly completed project. They didn't even know what kit they'd installed on site, and the plans the client had been issued for M&E reference were toilet paper.

Wunda or any others!

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There are lots of costings being thrown around in this thread but no one has used the running costs of an ASHP where solar power (or wind/water) power is part of the equation. Surely an a heat pump powered by solar must be cheaper than fossil fuel powered systems?

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, patp said:

Surely an a heat pump powered by solar must be cheaper than fossil fuel powered systems?

Erm….🤔
Solar power won’t be man enough to run a heat pump for heating in winter unless it’s a 20+ kWp array with a very good south facing setup. 
When you need heat, it’s winter, therefore 25% max ( usually a lot less ) PV output. 
 

So, in a nutshell, no.

Edited by Nickfromwales

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6 hours ago, patp said:

no one has used the running costs of an ASHP where solar power (or wind/water) power is part of the equation

It is easy enough to run the numbers and see what comes out.

While the performance in mid winter may not be good, all months except December and January, PV could me a major contributor to the energy demand of a heat pump.

The trouble is that matching the times that PV generates in with the times that you need the HP to run.  This is not a problem for DHW as that is stored, though parasitic heat loss can eat away any advantage on a badly designed system.

Space heating is a lot harder as you need a way to store the energy for later.  This is usually done 'in the slab', but would mean that you may get an unacceptably high temperature when you don't want it, or the HP is cycling too often.

So what would normally happen is that you have to work with averages and accept that at some times you are importing energy, possibly and a high cash price i.e. 6 PM.

We are now getting fairly close where a combination of PV, Battery Storage and HPs together with some software could probably make a very cost effective system.

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On 20/07/2021 at 12:50, SteamyTea said:

Ok, to clear this up, and stop you trolling, can you show us your heat loss calculations for your house, and your DHW useage. Then show us all why it is not possible to have a HP system deliver the same outputs.

Then show us the difference in running costs, and installation cost, rather than vague and misleading statements.

If you are not willing, or able (which we both know is the real reason) to supply this information, then you don't have anything to contribute.

that tiggles!

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Would a carbon tax on gas and a corresponding subsidy on electric persuade people?  I wonder if 5p per kWh would have a significant impact?  It would more than double the cost of gas, but you would save a bit on your electric.

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