Russell griffiths

Getting Wi-fi in remote location

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The title is not 100% correct. But it sort of sums it up. 

 

We have two holiday let cabins that that we would like to get a good internet service to they sit at the end of our land about 200m away from our new house, now I have just started talking to BT about a connection to the house, but I’m wanting to find out on other methods of getting internet down there. 

My wife is currently working from home in a spare room we have changed into an office the problem is the wife’s mother is coming to stay for a few months as they have just sold a house in London and are looking around our way for something. 

So I need to find the wife a new office space the cabins will be fine but we need good internet. 

 

So what options are there to receive a good internet signal. 

 

My first thoughts are a hard wired line from the new house, but what about dish receiver things, do they work, will it cost more than trenching 200m and still be crap. 

 

Does signal strength drop over the length of the cable. 

 

Thoughts please people this is not my strong point. 

 

Cheers russ. 

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Last time I looked you cannot do more than 100M in one run with Cat6 so would need something half way.

 

What about 4G mobile?  If you get a good signal from three they do a very good cheap unlimited data sim.

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Cat cable is only 100m . Buy far thr most easy and reliable is just a directional Point to point . Cable into one , cable out the the other into local WiFi/router box in your cabin . Something like

https://www.broadbandbuyer.com/products/28800-ubiquiti-nbe-5ac-gen2-pnp/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAgomBBhDXARIsAFNyUqMWx9hcfz54HsuA_-ZHNyW0IMg4pKw7mFRe5JDvhuA7YSqFF5pYbPAaApRMEALw_wcB

 

Guide here

https://wifigear.co.uk/blog/linking-buildings-point-to-point-wireless-guide/

 

 

just to say ; regarding the internet connection the main house we decided to just use a data Sim and directions antenna roughly pointing to the nearest tower (as we only had 2-3 bars on my phone). It’s great at 80MBs in both directions and reliable. 

Edited by gc100
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personally given the cost I would give a cable a bash, 305m in a box. Worth an experiment, even running 200m off the drum and sticking some ends on it.

 

appreciate it’s meant to be 100m 

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2 minutes ago, TonyT said:

personally given the cost I would give a cable a bash, 305m in a box. Worth an experiment, even running 200m off the drum and sticking some ends on it.

 

appreciate it’s meant to be 100m 


I tried this and it didn’t work for me . Quality Cat6/7 might work but the wire is so thin you get a large voltage drop over that distance . You might be lucky if you routers can handle it. You can put point to point (tp link) at the same price as 200m of cat cable. 

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I tried a long run at 110M and it worked, just, very slow connection.  No way will it work 200M without something in the middle.

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14 hours ago, Dave Jones said:

https://www.starlink.com/

 

Very very good according to people who are trying it in Cornwall.

 

 

I thought I'd sign up...not at those prices!

 

What does "fully refundable" mean?

 

Screenshot_20210209-223201.thumb.png.328b4080bda6fb02799ceda3a7908f32.png

 

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Get yourself a Pharos WiFi Access point, circa £90 for a pair. Use one at the house with the internet connection and point to the cabins where the other one is situated.
https://www.broadbandbuyer.com/products/19209-tp-link-cpe510kit/

Our village uses them for community broadband (effectively Wi-Max). I additionally use one to light up my garden, if I point in the the right direction, I can get wifi about 4-6km away.

 

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A decent dedicated wifi router, with a colander behind it.

I think BT did a good router that claimed it could do 300m.

 

If there is a decent 4G signal, let they use their own service.

 

Edited by SteamyTea

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Powerline adaptors (network over mains) have a theoretical range up to around 300m but are very dependent on the topology of the mains wiring.

 

If the two cabins get their mains from a point close to or in your house it might be worth trying.  If they have their own separate grid connection then no. 

 

I'm using these to get wifi in an outbuilding.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0746HVPMC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

One box in my house near the CU, other box plugged into a socket in the outbuilding provides a wifi access point. 

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3 minutes ago, Paul Leigh said:

Get yourself a Pharos WiFi Access point, circa £90 for a pair. Use one at the house with the internet connection and point to the cabins where the other one is situated.
https://www.broadbandbuyer.com/products/19209-tp-link-cpe510kit/

Our village uses them for community broadband (effectively Wi-Max). I additionally use one to light up my garden, if I point in the the right direction, I can get wifi about 4-6km away.

 

 

That looks like your best bet so far.

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14 hours ago, Dave Jones said:

Very very good according to people who are trying it in Cornwall.

Not many places down here that don't get fairly good coverage with 4G.

Lizard Peninsular is one, strange as it is the home of wireless transmission.  May have been to do with Goonhilly not wanting stray signals.

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7 hours ago, Temp said:

Powerline adaptors (network over mains) have a theoretical range up to around 300m but are very dependent on the topology of the mains wiring.

 

If the two cabins get their mains from a point close to or in your house it might be worth trying.  If they have their own separate grid connection then no. 

 

I'm using these to get wifi in an outbuilding.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0746HVPMC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

One box in my house near the CU, other box plugged into a socket in the outbuilding provides a wifi access point. 

 

I've read/heard of a few people swearing blind that their "powerlink" adapter (I use the term generically), "won't work over the steel wire armoured". Neighbour is one of them in fact. I'd guess his garage is 50m from the house, maybe more. No idea how his SWA is run. Not sure if they just work over just L & N? Thinking if maybe they're stopping the earth short of the garage/summer house/shed and rodding locally. 

 

Could just be dodgy connections I guess...

Edited by Onoff

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I have a network over mains for my cabin, the main router is in the house and I have a 50m extension cable to a cabin and another wifi access point plugged into the end and it works fine.
The cabin is on a separate mains supply from the house (same electric pole but another feed) and this prevents the network from linking if plugged directly into the cabin as the phone / router is only on the house supply (hence the 50m extension cable) I need to update the system as having an extension cable randomly strewn across the property is crap.... so following this thread carefully. 

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We are running on MiFi mobile interweb while we try to sort out a line problem, it is really good.

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4G mobile internet ( assuming you get 4g ) . 30 quid ish a month with three .

Hassle free solution 

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6 hours ago, Russell griffiths said:

@Nickfromwales

 

have a read of this. 

As ( iirc ) the cabins will eventually need a rock solid internet connection / WiFi signal ( and possibly TV set top boxes ) I’d just extend the armoured BT cable and get subscribed connection(s) with stand alone router(s) ( c/w WiFi ) installed permanently at each of the cabins. 
If you do extend your BB connection to lend it to the cabins then your bandwidth will be gone when you try to ‘share’ the connection.

You could probably service both cabins with a single subscription for the get - go ( multi-room option with 2x set top boxes ) and take a PoE WAP to the other cabin. Limit will be how much stuff can ‘be online’ at any one time so all depends on how good a service connection you get to start with. 

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With the Pharos point to point or indeed any kind of wireless access points it is possible to set bandwidth quotas or QoS.

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@Paul Leigh 

 

or anyone with experience !

 

I have recently signed up for unlimited 4g wireless internet with EE provided through a router 

I have no landline 

 

My property consists of 5 dwellings that need internet 

 

All the buildings are in a rough circle and  at max about 30 metres apart 

 

in the future i may have another cabin further away that needs wifi. 
 

At moment I have the router up a pole in the middle of the property with an armoured cable running to it...... 

 

it sort of works but not well and especially not well where the buildings have calotex insulation in them... 

 

 

so my question is - is the TP link / Pharos the answer I am looking for ? 
 

I am reading the blurb on the website but as I am a Luddite it’s all very confusing.

 

thanks for any advice

 

cpd  

 

 

 

 

 

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