Triassic

Brick Slips for Interior Feature Wall

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We want a bit of a different look to our stairwell. We’re thinking steel stairs and a brick wall.
 

As our new build is timber frame, how easy you’ll it be to install brick slips to the interior wall? Are there any cheap options when it comes to brick slips?

 

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I used brick slips on the outside of my house as a plinth and my son used them on a chimney breast. He just used tile adhesive and 10mm spacers.

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Pretty easy to use - there are a couple of different systems but they work much better on a tile backer board so consider that rather than plasterboard. 
 

Interior systems are easier than exterior as they don’t need to be waterproof. 
 

Range in price from £20-40 sqm for the tiles plus grout and adhesive. 

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We have them inside and out. We used the system that has vacuum formed horizontal guides glued to cement board.

 

I really wasn't happy with the results, but a large part of that was the tiler and the poor quality slips we were supplied with (some are bent like bananas!) If care is taken with installation, and/or a better system used, I can't see why they shouldn't look fine.

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or natural random stone  if you really want to make AN IMPRESSION 

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8 hours ago, jack said:

Really wasn't happy with the results, but a large part of that was the tiler and the poor quality slips we were supplied with (some are bent like bananas!)

I was wondering if I could us bricks cut in half and stick these onto a backer board fixed to the timber frame? That was we can hand pick the bricks, we’re looking for a fairly industrial, loft style, finish.

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@Triassic by coincidence today I was researching brick slips while await my planning permission. I will need to cut some brick slips for the specials that will bridge to an angled wall I will have in my design.

 

In doing so, I stumbled upon an entire world of brick cutters, cutting bricks not just slips. To my surprise there seems to multiple such companies in each county. Here is just one example fairly near me in East Anglia to give you an idea: http://www.masterlaybrick.com. They can make slips from any brick you choose.

 

As an aside, I have learnt there are two types of brick slip tiles: (1) those made by cutting bricks; and (2) those made by extrusion. Type 1 creates rather more waste in the production process so, to my eye, Type 2 seems better.

 

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1 hour ago, Onoff said:

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Not quite what “her indoors” had in mind!

 

She said her mum and dad had the chimney breast papered in that in the 1980s!

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At least it could easily be removed, unlike the stuff some people put on the outside in the 1980s...

 

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10 hours ago, Triassic said:

Not quite what “her indoors” had in mind!

 

She said her mum and dad had the chimney breast papered in that in the 1980s!

 

I have seen these used in rentals quite effectively. Very good for "generation Instagram".

 

My Letting Agent also PM renovations for investors, and they actually did a "scaffold plank feature wall" (with real scaffold planks). 

 

Here's one that uses Brick Wallpaper.

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Edited by Ferdinand

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22 hours ago, Triassic said:

We want a bit of a different look to our stairwell. We’re thinking steel stairs and a brick wall.
 

As our new build is timber frame, how easy you’ll it be to install brick slips to the interior wall? Are there any cheap options when it comes to brick slips?

 

There are also options now which use textured porcelain tiles to get the effect. If you have larger tiles may be easier to fit.

 

Not unlike a brick version of the "wood" porcelain tiles you get for your floor. Somebody on BH has them and likes them - @Christine Walker maybe (?)

 

Example not recommendation: 

https://www.tilemountain.co.uk/blog/brick-tiles-exposed-brick-without-the-mess/

 

Do this properly and you just powerwash it once a year 🙂 .

 

Ferdinand

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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47 minutes ago, Ferdinand said:

Do this properly and you just powerwash it once a year 🙂 .

I’m not sure about power washing inside, after all the brick slips are for the stairwell walls.

 

Thanks to everyone for the contributions. Having looked at the various potions were leaning towards either slips or the tiles. Ideally we’d like to look at some actual walls made of these things.

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There are brick effect render systems which look ok. 

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6 minutes ago, Onoff said:

 

Let's be honest these look pretty good. Go round a curve too:

 

 

Don’t they look too perfect?
 

We want something is character, in the past we’ve used second hand common brick, some sooty, others with bits of paint still visible, the odd corner and edge chipped. This is the industrial feel we’re after.

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13 hours ago, Dreadnaught said:

As an aside, I have learnt there are two types of brick slip tiles: (1) those made by cutting bricks; and (2) those made by extrusion. Type 1 creates rather more waste in the production process so, to my eye, Type 2 seems better.

 

We have two types of brick slips on our house, both extruded.

 

One is an engineering brick. Unfortunately, the extrusion and firing process has left very slight vertical waves that look odd in certain lights. Also, the corner slips are an entirely different colour to the main slips. Unfortunately, the person installing them didn't notice or didn't care, and by the time we realised it was too late.

 

The other was just the cheapest slip they did, because it was going to be painted white. Unfortunately, several of these were noticeably bent, but again, we didn't find that out until they'd been installed.

 

I'm sure extruded slips can be done properly, I'd just look carefully to make sure that what's delivered is exactly what you're expecting.

 

2 minutes ago, Triassic said:

Don’t they look too perfect?
 

We want something is character, in the past we’ve used second hand common brick, some sooty, others with bits of paint still visible, the odd corner and edge chipped. This is the industrial feel we’re after.

 

I agree, and this is what we'd have specified had we known a bit better (or thought more carefully).

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2 minutes ago, Triassic said:

Don’t they look too perfect?
 

We want something is character, in the past we’ve used second hand common brick, some sooty, others with bits of paint still visible, the odd corner and edge chipped. This is the industrial feel we’re after.

 

I've some old tins of paint and chimney sweepings your welcome to if you wanted to s**t them up a bit. Is that "real" though? Would there be that sense of history about it? Could you really feel the blood, sweat & tears of the common man if you did that?

 

😉

 

 

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I said the other week how I've been using my Rage Evolution saw to cut bricks with the diamond blade. I can confirm you can halve a brick lengthways. This lad has made a jig:

 

 

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so I've never really been able to work out, what's the difference between these Evo saws and a bog-standard sliding chop?

Edited by dpmiller

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4 minutes ago, dpmiller said:

so I've never really been able to work out, what's the difference between these Evo saws and a bog-standard sliding chop?


A bog standard sliding chop has a fairly fast running motor and some decent tolerance but is designed to just do wood cutting. 
 

The Evo ones have a slightly slower running motor so they can run different types of blades for different materials, and usually from experience have tolerances that you can measure with a yardstick ..... 

 

You can probably tell, I’m not a fan .. 

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