jack

Members
  • Content Count

    5,889
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    32

jack last won the day on April 12

jack had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,702 Excellent

About jack

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Personal Information

  • Location
    SE England

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. No idea, sorry. I just remember one or two posters from a few years back saying how big a difference this made. @ProDave, were you one of the people who did this?
  2. Welcome. I'm sure someone said it was very helpful to build a "skirt" (of osb maybe?) around the lower edge of the static caravan to stop the wind whistling through underneath. Helps keep things a little warmer and reduces the chance of pipes freezing.
  3. I watched this episode tonight and was shouting at the TV by this point. That and them only looking at the electricity supply two years into the build I liked their enthusiasm and energy, but they seemed very naive. Or perhaps I'm getting old and cynical. Or maybe both. I suspect, as is often the case with GD, that they've left some items out when totting up the budget (I mean, £16k for electricity and £11k for tree removal!), but I suppose there's no kitchen, no heating system, and who knows whether all the bathrooms have been finished. I liked the general vibe of what they were going for, but replicating the old tumbledown building really didn't do it for me. The lead flashing ruined the whole effect imo. How could he be an architect - even a newly qualified one - and have given no thought to how he'd interface the timber frame with the top of the wall? Overall it was just a bit unsatisfying, but they're happy, and that's the main thing.
  4. We went private. We needed a warranty in case we needed to sell it within 10 years of buying it, and it was quite a bit more expensive to get building regs and warranty handled separately, so we did them as a combined deal. The guy who did the inspections was really good. He was pretty relaxed, and the couple of things he pulled us up on were fair enough. I suspect it's as much about who you're lucky/unlucky enough to get as which company you engage.
  5. Yes, I descaled it before I contacted them. I need to check, but I believe it's in one piece from the screw-on tank connection at one end of the flex to the outlet of the tap. From memory, the flex connection from the tank is swaged to the bottom of the tap tube, so can't be replaced.
  6. Interesting timing. Our Quooker is a similar age to yours, and we started having issues with the tap a few weeks ago. It turns on, you can hear the relay clicking, but nothing comes out. After some testing (with guidance from Quooker, who've been very helpful I have to say), it's become apparent that there's a blockage in the flex to the tap, or within the tap itself. They've said it's possible that the internal pipe in the tap could have twisted over time. Annoyingly, it isn't serviceable, so the only solution is replacement of the whole tap at something like £200 for chrome, or £260 for stainless. Also annoyingly, they no longer make the brushed finish we have with the current tap. When I get a moment, I plan to take it off the sink and see whether some scale has clogged it. If so, hopefully I can descale it.
  7. I considered non-slip additives, but didn't go for them in the end. I'm pleased I didn't as i suspect it would have been messier, and harder to get a neat finish. I also didn't want to risk it being difficult to roll things around. It's a fairly smooth finish, but I've never had any issues with it being slippery when wet. I'm pretty careful how I move around if there's any moisture though. It's mainly an issue near the garage door. The floor can get damp if it's raining and I have the door open. One thing to keep in mind with epoxies is that they aren't all UV stable. Promain did warn me about the potential for colour change where the epoxy gets exposed to sun, especially where the concrete extends outside the door, and certainly there's been a slight change in colour after about 18 months. It's really only something you notice when the door is open and both colours are lined up beside each other.
  8. I'm sure you're aware of this, but for the avoidance of any doubt (and for anyone coming along later who doesn't know), the insulation is put onto the surfaces of the walls around the fridge, not on the fridge itself. A decent gap is needed between the insulation and the fridge to allow airflow to take the heat away.
  9. That's an almost identical size and layout to the kitchen of a friend of ours. It won't be too big when you have a couple of people moving around in it! I appreciate that you've said this before, but I don't know how loud your fridge must be for this to be an issue. We have a separate (admittedly inbuilt) fridge and freezer in our open plan kitchen. I'm extremely sensitive to noise, but I have no idea whether they're on or not. In contrast, I can hear the built-in bar fridge in our pantry clearly when it kicks in, despite it being about three metres further away than the main fridge and freezer. I keep meaning to check the noise ratings of these units to compare them, but frankly there's not a great deal of point given I'm not going to replace the pantry fridge just because it's slightly noisy. However, anyone looking at fridges would do well to factor noise ratings into their analysis, especially if they aren't planning to build them in and/or are sensitive to noise. That said, I think your main point is that you wouldn't want a single open-plan kitchen and family room as your only living space, and I completely agree with that. At the very least, I think a separate TV room or snug is very useful. This is particularly the case if you have kids, who especially in their teenage years will want their own space (and/or you'll want space away from them!) We have a separate living room and a TV room, and even then we sometimes wish there was an additional space for us to get away from each other without going upstairs!
  10. No worries. To be clear, it's more the fact that there were two posts on the same topic than where you posted. If you'd just posted in Boffin's Corner, it wouldn't have been moved.
  11. @ollie, I've merged the two threads you started on this topic into one. I think this is the more appropriate forum than Boffin's Corner where the other one was.
  12. 7 or 8 years is a long time to leave something like this without action. It may be that your right to get them to do something about it themselves has expired, or may be perhaps more difficult to enforce. I'd just write to them to confirm that the driveway is causing drainage problems and risks damaging your wall, and that you will therefore be removing the section of the the driveway on your property 14 days after the letter has been delivered. If he wants a different outcome or approach, he needs to let you know during that period.
  13. My understanding about Miele is that they're great for things that involve pumping stuff around: dishwashers, washing machines, and vacuum cleaners, in particular. In other areas, they may not even manufacture what they sell under the brand. For example, I believe their freezers are rebadged (or at least made by) Liebherr. My in-laws have Miele ovens and rate them highly (they'd want to, for the price!) I've read some horror stories about Miele's technical support when things go wrong. Take a look at the negative reviews on, eg, Trustpilot. That said, they seem to have improved a bit since when I last looked a few years back. At the time, I seem to recall there being far more bad reviews, but I could be misremembering. I believe that only some divisions were sold (and the story is as you say: quality has significantly suffered since). We bought an AEG dryer a few years ago that came with an extended 5 year warranty and cashback. It's been flawless. I believe dryers are within one of the product divisions that wasn't sold off.
  14. I have an up/down spring-loaded toggle switch for every set of blinds in each room, so they're simple to control manually if I decide to do something different to their programming. That said, I use the switches very rarely, because the blinds have been automated. Remember, it's home automation, not home make-everything-electric-and-fiddly.