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My next project - The Pantry


ProDave

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Slowly ticking off the bits to "finish" the house and the pantry has come to the top of the list.

 

This is basically a small rectangle in the corner of the kitchen partitioned off to make a walk in cupboard with shelving.  The corner of the rectangle will be cut off at 45 degrees and into that cut off corner will be a bi fold Oak door.

 

I am knocking up ideas how to do this bit.

 

Conventionally you would form the corner and then make the door opening in a short straight bit of wall.  But that would widen the width of that 45 degree wall thus reducing the space inside the pantry.

 

So i have come up with this mockup.  to try and make the 45 degree cut off just the width of the door and it's liner.

 

pantry_1.thumb.jpg.42b6e199e41522f898b665ee41dd6a00.jpg

 

The bit of wood on the floor with the pencil on it represents the door.

 

The last stud in the corner will be at 45 degrees.  That will probably be made in practice with 4 * 2 with a corner planed or ripped off at 45 degrees.

 

The door liner is made from 12mm thick planed oak, as most of my other door liners have been.

 

And a bit of Oak corner bead in lieu of architrave.

 

All the proper joiners will now be shaking their heads.  Tell me why not, or how better to do it while taking up the minimum space?

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No comment on the joinery. But as to the larder, cool is best, so you don't want that warming up to room temperature, and a reasonably close fitting door is best. Bi-folds have gaps all round so won't do that, unless you also fit seals and closures.

 

That's a well used set square.  Reminds me that I meant to broadcast that Tescos had school geometry sets for about £1.50 recently.

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The set square must be 50 years old.  Well battered, you would not want to try using it to do a detailed drawing.

 

I think the pantry being "cool" is a forlorn hope in a well insulated house.  We did omit UFH in that corner of the room, but there is no stopping it getting to the room temperature.  It is more of a big cupboard to keep all the food stuff out of the way.

 

SWMBO wants stone shelves in there.  the jury is still out on that one..... 

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In our last house (1820 build) it had a cellar room, stone floor, 3" thick stone shelves, and even though that part of the house was very well insulated, that room was always the same, cool temperature. SWMBO wish of stone shelves, may be a wise one, they take lots of energy to heat up.

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I will call by the stone merchant in Inverness and see what they can offer, hoping to get a good deal to use up offcuts?  I think it has always been a desire for a "pantry with stone shelves" rather than a technical reason.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Slow progress.

 

The first of the 2 stud walls built with my unusual angled corner posts.

 

pantry_2.thumb.jpg.398c18ac700cfc9973de258d3f94cc6c.jpg

 

pantry_3.thumb.jpg.c6ee1a87446fa1f17f17a3cb534f0dfb.jpg

 

I can't make the door opening and therefore build the second wall until I know the size of the door.  It is stated as 762mm wide, but one review says it is only 750mm wide.  It does not actually matter which, but it is no good building a 762mm wide gap to then find the door is only 750mm wide.

 

So the door arrived today.  Well I now know the door is in fact about 752mm wide.

 

The bad news is door No 1 arrived damaged.  I have reported the damage to the supplier and door No 2 is now on it's way.  More waiting around.  Good job I am not in a hurry.

 

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  • 1 month later...

This is progressing reassuringly slowly.  Mainly due to taking a long time to make up our minds just how to proceed.

 

But today was a milestone, we collected the stone shelves and lifted them straight into place.

 

StoneShelves.thumb.jpeg.31eef5b1e2e6fbfe03b06ebdb90c41aa.jpeg

 

Unfortunately the bottom one was supplied wrong, it should be a little deeper.  They are re making that one.

 

The bottom 2 shelves will be painted wood.

 

Until the correct bottom shelf is fitted I can't put the door on or else it would be in the way.

 

Now we have another design problem.  The wall opposite the main shelf wall, we want some shallow shelves, big enough for tins and jars, so shelves big enough for a standard baked bean tin, with a lip to stop them getting knocked off.  Preferably something ready made as a shelf unit.

 

But i can't find anything.

 

Looking for something like this which you can buy from some kitchen suppliers as a shelf unit fitted to the back of a kitchen cabinet door

 

MingleShowroomCherryKitchen_09_0.jpg

 

But I can only find those as an option to buy with a kitchen unit.  I just want something similar to screw to a plain flat wall.  any ideas?

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1 hour ago, ProDave said:

we collected the stone shelves and lifted them straight into place.

That stone looks nice - and expensive or did you manage to get a deal! We have a very similar space to outfit so interested in your ideas. Where did you source the brackets?

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The stone wasn't cheap, too big to be a cheap offcut deal.  but SWMBO wanted stone so she got stone.  the compromise is the two bottom shelves being wood.

 

Wanted good solid brackets that can take the weight without bending and bought these ones https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/644302988/heavy-duty-shelf-bracket-industrial?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=metal+shelf+brackets&ref=sr_gallery-1-13&frs=1&organic_search_click=1

 

They come as plain bare steel and had 2 coats of black hammerite.

 

With this being a small room with a big cost, it is definitely the most expensive bit of the house in £ per square metre.

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Found this🤔tacky?

Or this

 

On the stone front, we wanted some Caithness stone for the exterior door cills, so popped up to the quarry, there was literally 1000's of tonnes of stone sat on pallets everywhere, went in and said I'd cut to size if I could find suitable pieces and they told me all the pallets were for orders(can't believe that) and if I wanted to order the leadtime was around 6 months. Walked away with tail between my legs.

Edited by Jenki
typo
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1 hour ago, Jenki said:

Walked away with tail between my legs.

I'm a Scot..but British if you catch my drift. I say sod them.. what about some York stone or Honister Slate from the Wales for example?

 

What about Bath limestone if you want something  a bit more special?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, Jenki said:

Found this🤔tacky?

Or this

 

On the stone front, we wanted some Caithness stone for the exterior door cills, so popped up to the quarry, there was literally 1000's of tonnes of stone sat on pallets everywhere, went in and said I'd cut to size if I could find suitable pieces and they told me all the pallets were for orders(can't believe that) and if I wanted to order the leadtime was around 6 months. Walked away with tail between my legs.

The first link would probably do, but we would need 2 of them.  A bit pricey for something so basic looking.

 

The second link looks a lot nicer but even more expensive.  But it does give me ideas how to just go and buy some wood and make my own.  

 

When building our first house we considered Caithness stone for the hearth.  Got a similar reaction to you and a quite ridiculous price to cut a piece to size.  In that house we used ceramic tiles on the concrete hearth.

 

This stone for the shelves (and previously for the kitchen worktops and stove hearth) came from Stone Source in Inverness.  

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13 hours ago, Onoff said:

I'm amazed you're not making them yourself!

+1, I made a jar rack fir the inside of my larder unit, piece of cake 😇 (sorry no pic) made from pine and a dowel to stop jars falling off (I hate deep cupboards where stuff gets lost at the back) .

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