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  1. Hi All, I am looking to carry out a 2 storey wrap around extension. My next door adjoining neighbour has something similar, the only slight difference is a step back from my boundary by about 2m. Therefore, the rear extension that they have is not full width I presume that they have done this to pass the 45 degree rule as I do not have an extension at present. But I am presuming that as they have an extension, I can do a similar rear extension but mine will be across the full width of the house. Will this pass planning , as my neighbour has a somewhat similar extension? Thanks
  2. Hi All, Our builder called round yesterday to say he'd had a cancellation and could start our small, single-storey extension next week (about 6-8 weeks sooner than we had planned) if we wanted him to do so. Given how difficult it is to get a decent builder to even quote for a job at the moment I rather hastily said it would be fine. Now, as I realise how unprepared I am I'm starting to worry a little. I like to be fully prepared for something like this and that includes understanding the methods and materials that they'll be using. It will be at least a week after they start until they actually start building (there's an existing structure to remove, drains to lay, water main to re-route and foundations to dig and pour) so I have a little breathing room. The extension will be 3.2m x 1.6m and sit in the L of two existing solid stone walls (one of which is rendered) so we're effectively building just the two new walls. We are knocking the exisitng outer wall through to make a larger kitchen, that wall is 400mm thick stone. I asked about what type of structure they would use when knocking through and they said proabably Catnic lintels supported in the wall on one side and on vertical steel posts at the other. Having looked at Catnic lintels I'm not sure whether they are the best choice for stone walls? I'd also be grateful for your opinions on construction methods for the walls. The builder proposed three different methods: double skin wall of concrete blocks with insulation between, single skin block with timber frame inside and insulation in the framing, timber framed with either timber cladding or a stone veneer. I imagine that each method has it benefits and drawbacks but as of today which do you think would offer the best combination of thermal efficiency, acoustic insulation and value for money (based on both material and labour costs). Is there an alternative construction method that I should be aware of that isn't overly complex, expensive and suits the scale of this project? As far as looks are concerned there is exposed stone to one side of the extension and rendered stone to the other so either stone or render will be cohesive, I suspect that timber may look slightly at odds being a third material type. I feel like my back is to the wall somewhat but I don't want to pass up the opportunity to have the work done if it means I have to wait another 6 months to get them back again. My builder and agreed to take the weekend to consider the project and discuss it again on Tuesday. By then I'd like to have a clear idea of my best options so I don't get strong-armed into something I'm not entirely happy with. As ever, all thoughts, contributions and opinions are greatly valued.
  3. Hi All, We're considering replacing an existing single storey lean-to extension with new structure, essentially on the same footprint. We're in a detatched house with plenty of space around. I've read the PD documentation and couldn't find anything specifically relating to this situation. The current extension consists of a brick built wall about 1m high with conservatory style glazing above and a glass roof which constitutes a porch area. We would like to replace the structure with something more substantial and better insulated then knock through to create a larger kitchen. Construction would probably be rendered block to harmonise with the section of building it will adjoin. A new casement window will be fitted to the front elevation (significantly smaller than the existing glazed area) and one or two roof windows would be fitted). Do you think we need PP or will PD cover it? Or would neither apply if it were considered to be just an improvement of the existing structure?
  4. Hi everyone I’d welcome your thoughts please, especially on heating. Wanted to reach out to you all as I’m finding it’s tough to get unbiased advice and personal experience. We’re just about to start a renovation and extension project to a bungalow. The existing building is a time capsule from 1979 with a stunning avocado bathroom suite so we need to do the works: heating, ventilation, electrics, skimming, new flooring etc. So we have a blank canvas. We’re trying to work out the classic air source heat pump vs gas, and UFH vs radiators conundrum. The existing property is 60m2 with a concrete floor (the very fashionable original self-adhesive tiles are below an equally fashionable retro carpet). Ceiling height is c.2.3m. We need to plasterboard the ceilings before skimming, so are losing a touch of height there. The extension will be 30m2. Attic insulation is going to be increased, there’s cavity wall insulation, and we’ll be putting in new windows. We’re looking at installing MVHR. The existing property’s radiators need replacing anyway and the pipes are all currently mounted on the walls, so if we went for rads here it would be a big job including all the pipework chased through the walls, etc. Even if we couldn’t afford a heat pump now, we’d want to make it as ‘heat pump ready’ for the future as possible by using low flow temp rads, etc. Because of the expense of this scenario, we wonder the actual cost difference with the alternative, which is a low-profile retrofit UFH system? I’ve been researching and awaiting quotes - I’ve heard back so far from Nu-Heat for their LowPro Max. I’m concerned with appropriateness for the existing building, cost, additional lost ceiling depth (although I’m pretty short!), and if there’s a building regs issue with presumably having no insulation with the original concrete floor. We’d like to do UFH in the 30m2 extension and have been quoted so far for Nu-Heat’s relevant system. The grant from April closes the financial gap between a heat pump and a new gas boiler, as if we went for old school gas there would be extra costs to replace the ancient combi as well as moving the gas supply (crazy money!), required to accommodate the new floor plan. So as there would be a relatively minor jump in cost to a heat pump, we’re wondering if the time is right now? And if so, how this would influence the choice of UFH vs rads in the existing part of the house? Would really appreciate your ideas, observations and experience. Big thanks
  5. We're getting an extension built over the garage to extend the living space and we're trying to optimise for natural lighting. The design introduces more than the 25% of the extended floor space in new glass so we're told by the building regs people that we need to get SAP calculations done. Can anyone advise as to what the scope of those SAP calcs should cover and do I also need a new EPC certificate or does that come with it? I don't quite understanding if the evaluation needs to be done for the entire house or limited to just the space in which we're making changes to. I want to make sure I'm asking for quotes for what I actually need.
  6. Hi everyone, Hope you're all well! I recently purchased a 1930s semi detached house and plan to do a single storey rear extension for an open plan kitchen diner. The garage will also be converted into an office and I'm planning to add an en suite upstairs. Feel free to check out the attached drawings. I would love to hear your thoughts and any ideas to consider. Thanks!
  7. Hi there, this is my first post. I'm seeking some advice on how I go about planning my home extension. I am buying a 3 bed semi which is need of a complete gut out. We would like to do a double side + rear extension. I have an initial budget of approx £110k +£20k contingency to spend now in order to get the house ready to move in. I had a builder suggest phasing the refurb+build as the £130k probably wouldn't get us the whole double side + rear extension we're looking to do. I'm speaking to an architect about it to give us some options, but I'd love to get some advice and second opinions from experts on the forum that have done projects like this before. My main questions are How would you phase the build, given the initial budget will only stretch so far and we want to move in ASAP? Structurally, what do we need to consider with each phase if we took this approach? Roughly, do our budgets sound about right? Current floor plan Proposed phase 1 ground and first floor Refurb inside (new electrics, plastering, plumbing, boiler, floor, heating, doors, windows) Knock down existing garage and leave empty (building foundations for future phase) Rear extension approx 45m/sq (kitchen/diner + utility space) Proposed phase 2 Double side extension Build over existing rear extension for part double rear Loft - not part of design
  8. Hi everyone I'm buying a house with my mum to extend it to accommodate an annexe. Have lots to learn still.
  9. Morning, I was just wondering on people’s thoughts as to whether now is the right time to build an extension? I am aware of the high demand but also the lead times on materials and the increasing prices which are causing issues for builders. On top of that it will only increase demand for trades and whether there is enough quality trades available to do the work. I am keen to get a single storey extension but also I am not in a huge rush to get it done either so just split on whether to hang on or go ahead and get it booked.
  10. Hi all, My wife and I bought and Ex-Council house to refurb and extend both for practicality and for a bit more space. The plans have been in for a while and look to go through in January now after being postponed due to the volume in our parish council. We are doing most of the work ourselves but subbing out to the skilled trades. We are fairly competent and push our limits as much as possible. I’ve got a background in Estimating Commissioning of Commercial water and air systems and then Estimating Commercial Roofing & Cladding but have jumped over to become a Trading Standards Officer… a fun conversation with trades people! (Shortly followed by a “don’t worry”!) Joining the forum for help with any areas we may get stuck on. There are plenty being thrown up as we start to scratch the surface! In fact I’ve just posted our first problem here:
  11. Hi everyone! I’m new to this forum, I came across it yesterday when looking for some information on flooring insulation - found what I needed, thank you!! I decided to sign up so that I can get a bit more involved, and perhaps share the progress of our build that is due to kick off in March/April 2022. My partner and I bought a 50’s bungalow about 5 years ago, we re-wired, and heavily decorated/lightly renovated at that time, to make it liveable for the family until we could afford to extend and renovate properly. We have just received approval of our plans, and so are preparing to kick off the build when the weather improves - also giving us a bit more time to prep, save, buy a caravan, save, etc etc… Being a bungalow the front garden is big enough to site a static home, allowing us, the kids, the dog, the gecko, and all our stuff to move out….. yep, it’s going to be tight for a few months - that’s all a part of the fun, right!!!! I look forward to sharing progress in the new year!! Cheers for now!
  12. Hello, I am just looking to get a side extension to my 3 bedroom semi-detached house. I am just looking at which option is better for me in using a Design & Build option or whether to use an Architect to design before choosing a Builder. We are looking to have a new bigger kitchen with the extension. Small front room which we can maybe use as a spare bedroom in the future. Small downstairs toilet and shower area. Removal of old garage to the rear of the house and maybe add small shed/building for garden storage. Any opinions on which option could well suit best would be appreciated. Thanks, Tom
  13. Hi folks, I'm planning on doing a rectangular extension next to my house and join the 2 buildings with a hallway. Going to try to do most of the work myself but I have a skilled joiner and electrician/plumber onboard. I've done existing building drawings and a fairly simple version of what the new extension will look like, just waiting on my friend coming back with interior layouts before I submit for planning (extension is technically to the front of the existing house so it falls outside of permitted development). Some very good knowledge on here already so looking forward to harvesting some of it in the coming months!! Cheers
  14. Hi, first post but hopefully a quick and straightforward answer, so thanks in advance. had a quick search on the forum but couldn't see anything obvious where this had been discussed. we are looking to get a wraparound single storey extension on our semi detached house. Due to the odd shape of our land, the side part of the extension starts half way back so will not span the length of the house, so completely subordinate to original structure. As it's wraparound we know we will need to seek planning permission. This is fine. the question is how wide can this side part of the extension be. I see 'can be up to 50% the width of the original structure' in many places, but what isn't clear if this is a hard and fast rule, or whether it's only for PD purposes only. As we would seek planning permission can we break this 50% rule?. To put it into context, our house is 5M wide, so 50% would add a further 2.5M. Based on our own layout ideas we would want to take this nearer to 3M, but no greater. The rear would also go out to 3M. The house is only 10 years old so has no previous extensions. Thanks John
  15. Hello everyone, I would really like some advice regarding the quality of work we have just received from a roofing company contracted by the builder carrying out our single storey extension. I am not in the industry, but having seen the work I feel it is not to a good standard. We are speaking to the builder about it later this morning and I would just really like to be armed with other people's opinions before confronting the builder. My main concerns are the strange plastic verge edging along the main edges of the roof and the tiling around the Velux windows. Should there be a gap that big between the tiles and the Velux? Any help would be really appreciated. Thank you. David Scott
  16. Hello all! I have been reading the wealth of information (thank you ?) from this site for months & finally joined yesterday, don't know what took me so long! My husband, 6yr old daughter and I began a project on our tired 1950's bungalow (which we have lived in for 9 years) in May, which has involved pulling half of it down, and putting up a two storey extension in its place. We have gone for blockwork construction (dense externally, lightweight internally with 50mm PIR part fill in the cavity) and will be cladding in larch. We have lovely views all around us and so glazing has been key for us, but without wanting to go ultra-modern with the design. Our budget is very tight so we are putting our money into the structure with any fancy finishing touches just having to wait. Any advice is greatly welcomed.
  17. hi all, Desperate for some advice here. A dispute with our neighbour on land ownership (which they raised when our surveyor approached them for party wall matters) has brought a lot of delay to our house extension plans - now we are waiting to go to court. We believe the decision will sway in our favour, but our permission expires in 3 months Which means our permission is likely to run out, and party wall matters won't be settled (we are terrraced). Which (we think) leave us 2 options: Ask for an extension or somehow 'commence the works'. We emailed the council to explain, they said extensions are not granted as such. Someone said that is rubbish and we can request one by paying a fee. Which is correct? How do we apply for an extension, and will the neighbour be consulted for this (they didn't object when we initially applied 3 years ago but sure that if their consent is needed we are in for an unpleasant ride). Our understanding is we can't commence the works by say, digging foundations because we are a small terraced property and need a party wall agreement. Is there any other way we can commence the works? If we lift off the patio slabs where the extension will go, does that constitute commencement? ps: there were no specific conditions laid out for the permission other than re. materials used and potential party wall matters to consider. many thanks
  18. Hi there, just joined the forum and hoping to get some advice for the extension I'm currently planning. I’m having some plans drawn up for a ground floor extension, with a basement built underneath. We're comparing the basement option with a loft conversion, the main advantage of the basement being that it would give us more space and be cooler in the summer. The main disadvantages are of course cost and light. The basement will have 2 bedrooms and a bathroom with a staircase to get upstairs to the living room and kitchen area, and a shared light well for the two bedrooms with an external staircase to get into the garden. I’m struggling to know how deep the light well needs to be to let in enough light to make the two bedrooms a pleasant space. Currently on the designs it is 1800mm deep, spanning the width of the house. However, I would like to make the ground floor extension bigger without taking much more out of our back garden, so I'm thinking of making the lightwell smaller and adding some adjustable LED daylight panels (Lindby Kjetil LED ceiling panel 120 x 30 cm | Lights.co.uk) into the basement bedrooms. I have attached the first design draft, although internal things will move it gives a good idea of what we’re looking at. On the front/rear elevation page you can also see the loft conversion which we are considering. Some changes of note that we will make compared to this first draft: basement will be under the living area, dining area will be removed to create a bigger utility and we want to make the living area a little bigger to comfortably have a dining table in the living area. Does anyone have some experience of how deep a light well should be to let in a nice amount of light? Would the LED panels on daylight setting be good enough to compliment the natural light to make the basement rooms feel light? The rear garden (and therefore light well) are south facing. Also considering adding a shower en suite to one of the bedrooms by using the end of the light well which would reduce the size even further (approx 1.2m on one side). plans.pdf Thanks!
  19. Hi All. We have recently bought a mid-terrace property and have plans to extend to the rear. We have a problem with the neighbours rainwater drainage, which uses our property and would be blocked by any extension we built. Our next door neighbours have already created a garden room, built less than 10 years ago with a parapet party wall and multi-pitch roof. We have a small, original, singe storey pitch roof. There is a gulley drainage on their side of the parapet. The rearmost half drains to the rear edge of their property but the closest edge has been intentionally built so that the drainage runs over our pitch roof. I have attached photos and a schematic. There is a party wall agreement the drainage from this pitch roof apparently runs around the party wall then into a soak away in their garden. The document we have relating to the party wall makes no mention of this drainage. It seems like a strange setup that no owner of our house would agree to, but the house was previously let by a disinterested/cheap landlord. If we build a matching extension, this water would have nowhere to go. We have a good relationship with the neighbours but before addressing this I want to know where we stand. With no written agreement for this setup, could we demand they fix this? We would reconfigure all our drainage whilst building an extension and would not need to make use of their soakaway any longer. Many thanks in advance.
  20. I'm looking for some guidance on how to join a new timber frame to an existing wall. The timber frame will be clad with timber feather edge board so no brickwork to tie in with a wall starter kit. Do I just fix the timber stud to the brick wall with resin anchors, a vertical DPC and then some sort of flashing in the corner? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  21. Hi guys, Doing my extension and the foundations are in as are the blocks upto floor level. Hoping to get the slab done next week. Im planning to run two lengths of 25mm mdpe blue pipe through the hardcore that goes under the slab and out through a gap in the blockwork. One will be a conduit for running an electric cable out in the future so we can have power in the garden. This will come up by the fuse box. The other is to allow a water supply to the garden. This will.be connected in just after the stop cock. Is there any problem going 15mm (main feed) 25mm (under the slab) 15mm (outside tap). Was just wondering if this sounds ok? Or if I'm missing anything? Thanks Paul
  22. We have recently purchased a 1bed ground floor flat located in a terrace and are looking to remove the existing (poor quality) rear extension and erect a new 6m long full width extension in its place. As you will see from image 3 (attached) we are hoping to create a new bedroom within the new space. This bedroom would be entirely internalised as it falls within the building line of the upper floors (shown in blue on image 2). We would like to ensure that light does get to this room and are looking whether the solutions would be to insert clerestory windows within the building line (roughly sketched out in image 1 - attached). I have a couple of queries regarding this solution: 1) Is it acceptable in planning and building regs terms that the only windows serving this new habitable room are (likely unopenable) high level clerestory windows which would not provide an escape route in case of fire, or manual ventilation. 2) The property is south facing and receives great sunlight all year round. What are the chances that the Council (Wandsworth) would object to these types of windows on daylight/sunlight grounds 3) Structurally, are clerestory windows going to work in this instance when the majority of the existing wall will likely remain in place. This is our first home (and project) and any help this community can offer would be greatly appreciated by us.
  23. Hi, Just joining Build Hub today. We bought an unmodernised 1930s semi detached in September last year and have planning permission for a new two-storey extension to the rear and major renovations to the original property. Much to to do, navigate and learn and I'm sure we can learn a lot from you experienced self-builders on here. My partner is project managing everything (long term dream for him which I'm sure he already fears could turn into a nightmare!) and also getting stuck in himself where he can. I know we will need help! Liz
  24. I've begun the process of designing an extension and an fairly certain I'm going to have an insulated raft with icf walls. This will be adjoining a (likely strip foundation) cavity wall house. I've had a quote from isoquick for the raft approx 6m² but I'm not sure if it's worth extending this to cover the garage floor? It would essentially double the price, but the alternative is going to create a strip & Insulated raft & strip or raft monstrosity combo. Is it going to lead to problems? should I just swollow the extra cost even though its going to be a waste of resources and is an insulated raft even suitable for a garage floor? The upside I suppose, is that if the raft is continuing then it simplifies things and if someone decides they need another huge room downstairs in the future the prep will have been done....
  25. The planning permission i have for my rear extension gives me permission to build it out along the full width of my property. It's a semi detached property and I have a party wall agreement with my attached neighbour. Builder due to pour footings TOMORROW. Architect calls me today to say that he thinks builder has set out the footings in such a way that extension would be 5cm to 8cm narrower than it should be. I went to the property to meet the builder to see what's going on. Builder shows me he has taken the boundary line from the centrepoint of where the old fence post used to be. This would account for 3cm of the 8cm, as looking carefully at his line there are places where he has deviated from that line by 3cm. However, under the deeds, it's my fence - and I have always been responsible for maintaining it. Via google, i found this: It is normal practice when using a fence to mark a boundary to place the outer face of the fence along the boundary, so that the posts stand on the land of the of the fence's owner. This rule would suggest that the builder is wrong to take the boundary line from the centre of the fence post, and as my fence post was 8cm or 10cm wide, that would suggest a discrepancy of 4cm to 5cm. Having said that, the same article notes that this won't always be conclusive. I looked at my party wall agreement and note that it says I am to reinstate the fence after the building works have finished. If by the word "reinstate" there is an implication that it should be reinstated in exactly the same place, then that ignores the above rule. In any case: the party wall surveyors never asked me who owned that fence or where the exact limit of my boundary is - they've generally been quite sloppy so this is par for the course; and my neighbour and I both agree that reinstating the fence would look silly as it would be right up against the wall - I won't see it, so i care little about what it would look like, but it will inhibit the walls from breathing and will also cost me an extra £400 to £500 in fencing material and labour which I rather avoid. My builder has agreed to shave a bit off the trench wall to give me the additional 3cm so it is more accurately under the centreline of the fence post. But even doing that I would lose the 4cm to 5cm. I know that doesn't sound like a lot, but it will make a slight difference to the internal space. My fear is that even though legally I am probably entitled to use that additional 4cm to 5cm, relations with my neighbour are difficult at the best of times and if he believes I am taking his space he will probably kick up a fuss. What would you do?
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