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Isle of Wight Grand Designs

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That's a real shame for all concerned. Aesop's sucking his teeth.

Be not hasty to envy the conditions of others 

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I remember that one, the chap had just got over a brain tumor. The borrowing was terrifying on it, including monster amounts on credit cards. 

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For me, the most disappointing bit about the right Move listing is "EPC E"  FFS this is supposed to be a modern house just 3 years old.  I would be ashamed if I built something that bad.  Even our previous house built 16 years ago gets a C and that was just built to ordinary standards.

 

It is a lot of house in a cheap area. The IOW is not renowned for being an expensive place to buy a house.  I have said many times if you are not very careful the same could happen up here, except the decimal point in the cost and pricing would be moved one place to the left.

 

 

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6 minutes ago, ProDave said:

[...]

  I have said many times if you are not very careful the same could happen up here

[...]

 

And you'd still be dead right.

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9 minutes ago, ProDave said:

For me, the most disappointing bit about the right Move listing is "EPC E"  FFS this is supposed to be a modern house just 3 years old. 

 

I’m surprised that an E graded property passes modern building standards TBH. 

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If you look at the detail of the EPC it is a joke and shows what an utter waste of time they are in the present format.

 

The house has ground source heat pumps and mvhr - nil points for either on epc score.  Stick a solar panel on at a cost of 5k and it ups the epc rating - cost saving on energy usage nil.  Utter nonsense its a very energy efficient house but because it doesn't fit the tick box system it gets a lower score than a lego box.

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5 minutes ago, lizzie said:

If you look at the detail of the EPC it is a joke and shows what an utter waste of time they are in the present format.

 

The house has ground source heat pumps and mvhr - nil points for either on epc score.  Stick a solar panel on at a cost of 5k and it ups the epc rating - cost saving on energy usage nil.  Utter nonsense its a very energy efficient house but because it doesn't fit the tick box system it gets a lower score than a lego box.

 

Both MVHR and a heat pump will make a difference, by reducing the primary energy use, in the case of the heat pump, and by decreasing the heating requirement in the case of the MVHR.

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Posted (edited)

@JSHarris I know and agree but for the purpose of the epc on the  IOW house they are ignored in the assessment and that would seem to be the reason for the low rating as windows walls etc are all 5* rated in the assessment.

epc for iow house.pdf

Edited by lizzie

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2 minutes ago, lizzie said:

@JSHarris I know and agree but for the purpose of the epc on the  IOW house they are ignored in the assessment and that would seem to be the reason for the low rating as windows walls etc are all 5* rated in the assessment.

 

Looking at the as-built EPC it seems that the GSHP was included in the SAP worksheet, but as there was no air test (seems odd to me, I wonder why it wasn't air tested?) it looks like the default air leakage rate was used.

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If I was the owner I would be furious at that result.  

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The result does look really odd to me.  The design seems to have pretty reasonable U values for the wall, roof and floor (0.15 W/m.K², 0.12 W/m.K² and 0.11 W/m.K² respectively), reasonably good glazing from the look of it, yet wasn't air tested, so we have no idea how airtight it is.

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That looks like an RDSAP rating not the result of a full design SAP surely.

 

Whatever, 3 year heating cost of £15,285 and annual heating of 39,443 KWh per year just does not sound right at all.  I know our house is 20% of the size but it only cost £234 to heat it this winter and I am sure a Highland winter is a bit colder than the IOW.

 

I love the way the assessor suggests spending £5K - £8K on a small amount of solar PV that will save £0 per year.  With advice like that he needs the sack.

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15 minutes ago, ProDave said:

That looks like an RDSAP rating not the result of a full design SAP surely.

 

 

 

Seems to be the full as-built EPC, as it states that it's a new dwelling.

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Funny we all looked at the same thing.

 

It suggests 40,000 kWh of space heating a year. On gas this would be around £1300. It seems like the GSHP COP is ignored and they have calculated the heating cost at the normal cost of electricity and got over £5000 a year.

 

I remember this one when it was done and I thought the finishes on the outside were fantastic. I did wonder at the time what the prevailing cost of house on the Isle of Wight was. A quick look on Rightmove suggests the price is probably about correct, but at the top end of the market demand really dries up outside the south east.

 

Shame they have to sell at a loss.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

 

 

Seems to be the full as-built EPC, as it states that it's a new dwelling.

then how did the assessor get it so wrong? He would not be getting paid if it was mine until he got it correct.

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1 minute ago, ProDave said:

then how did the assessor get it so wrong? He would not be getting paid if it was mine until he got it correct.

 

I would guess that the builder/architect/project manager just didn't bother to make sure that the data provided to the assessor was accurate.  The absence of an air test figure for a house that should definitely have had one, I believe, seems every bit as odd as the high energy consumption figure. 

 

I made sure that the data I provided was as accurate as it could be, just to make sure that the EPC was also accurate.  Given that assessors don't visit completed houses, but rely on being sent the right data, there seems to be plenty of scope for things to go awry if the person sending the assessor the data doesn't understand the significance of some aspects of it, and the need for accuracy.

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I still can't understand HOW wrong it is, and that the assessor didn't even question how a new build could be so bad so question the data he was sent.

 

He seems to have the wall and window details correct and the fact it has MVHR so should be able to calculate the fabric heat losses. He knows it has a GSHP so if he was not provided data he should have asked.

 

I guess whoever was "in charge" just did not know or did not care. 

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I don't think the 40,000 kWh is necessarily wrong it is the calculation that turns that into £5,000 a year. That would be using direct electrical heat, not a heat pump. It might still be a bit high due to the lack of air tightness figure.

 

My U-values are similar and my SAP comes out on the border of A and B. I don't have the final figures yet. I am probably going to use around the same amount of space heat, although over a bit larger area.

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My EPC was nightmare... it came back so far adrift of what it should have been I could not understand it.

 

Finally after many emails and scratching of heads it appeared likely my SAP had been done on a completely different house (I had queried at the time why there was reference to a staircase in a single storey house and a zinc roof when mine is rubber and different heating and several other anomalies)......I was fobbed off at the time, but only realised that in hindsight when the epc issue occurred. The end result is I have an epc that is not as good as it should be but I was pushed into a corner as building inspector was booked to come out and sign off and it had to be done for that and for all sorts of reasons I wanted to get that sign off done and get on. 

 

I sometimes think I may get epc done again properly but then the moment passes again.

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I do wonder how worthwhile any EPC is going to be  -when we sold our last house, which of course had an EPC, we were required (still applicable in Scotland) to obtain a home report, which includes an EPC derived via rdSAP.  Try as I might to argue the case with the surveyor that we already had an EPC, it had to be refreshed as part of the home report.  It wasn't an issue for us as we had fitted additional Solar PV which scored highly with rdSAP, but the surveyor refused point blank to accept any of the information from the previous SAP worksheets.

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They have my sympathy on this one.

 

The EPC seems slightly strange in the handling of the GSHP .. no star rating.

 

The price is £415 per square foot. interesting .

 

Ferdinand

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3 hours ago, ProDave said:

It is a lot of house in a cheap area. The IOW is not renowned for being an expensive place to buy a house.

 

 

True but that is a choice spot and the fast ferry runs straight into Portsmouth Harbour railway station with onward commuter links to London.

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Posted (edited)

Given that the massive glazed façade over two storeys faces NNE and the default ventilation 15m/m2.hr applies, the 40000kWh/yr is possible.

Edited by A_L
typo

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55 minutes ago, Stones said:

I do wonder how worthwhile any EPC is going to be  -when we sold our last house, which of course had an EPC, we were required (still applicable in Scotland) to obtain a home report, which includes an EPC derived via rdSAP.  Try as I might to argue the case with the surveyor that we already had an EPC, it had to be refreshed as part of the home report.  It wasn't an issue for us as we had fitted additional Solar PV which scored highly with rdSAP, but the surveyor refused point blank to accept any of the information from the previous SAP worksheets.

You make a good point 

Other than the EPC being a legal requirement The EPC is pretty worthless 

I’ve recently had ours competed All from a desktop While I was truthfull I could have told them anything 

They were Quik to tell me that they can only go off the information provided 

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