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For designers; it makes me really sad the terrible choices people make


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2 hours ago, SteamyTea said:

I am not so sure, isn't that more a case of what is offered, rather than what is wanted.

Not having a TV means you miss out on all the delightful? programmes where people want to change the layout of their houses to create these spaces. Nowt as strange as folk.

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1 hour ago, Adsibob said:

i guess you could try focusing on "show don't tell". It's tricky though. People are often set in their ways and many aspects of design might be thought of as subjective, even though once people's own biases and experiences are filtered out, there is often an objectively better design when one compares two.


That’s a good idea. I do try to slowly show ideas through sketches but maybe focusing on that is the solution. People can be more a part of it that way too. But like you say, people go too far into it and make decisions before knowing the options. I think because designing houses is exciting!

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22 minutes ago, CharlieKLP said:


That’s a good idea. I do try to slowly show ideas through sketches but maybe focusing on that is the solution. People can be more a part of it that way too. But like you say, people go too far into it and make decisions before knowing the options. I think because designing houses is exciting!

The best experience i had with an architect was when he would sketch in front of me (or on zoom) using a digital sketching tool so that lines could be undone really easily. He would start sketching and get our initial impressions and then undo and redo whilst in the meeting with us so that his sketch was a somewhat iterative process. He could also mark-up existing drawings to show us the different ways of amending them, again being able to very quickly undo and redo anything we weren't too keen on. In this way he could take on board our feedback almost instantaneously, making the process much more collaborative. It would stop him going on what we perceived as a massive tangent to the original design brief or what we had in mind, thereby avoiding big wastes of time on said tangents.

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I'm going to add my comments here since I've been engaged in a bit of back and forth with some of the posters on here, on my own thread in the new build form (where my design was knocked quite a bit).

 

To answer your original question, there is one simple answer. You have to be good at sales. You can design the most brilliant houses but if you can't sell them to your clients then they're not getting built. Sometimes its as simple as laying out the rationale for your design choices, other times its going to be make your clients realise that what they want vs what they need are 2 separate things.

 

I also agree firmly with the advice on this thread that people who want to self build often do so because they can't find anything on the general market that meets their needs. Which means hundreds of properties viewed, rejected and through that process - usually a good list of what works and what doesn't for them. If you automatically assume that people don't know what they want and they should go with what you're recommending - you've lost before even getting started.

 

You may find the odd example of someone who will go with a completely new design, but people are people and confirmation bias is a real thing. They will want to work with someone who gives them what they want, calls them brilliant and praises their 'design nous'.

 

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58 minutes ago, Indy said:

I'm going to add my comments here since I've been engaged in a bit of back and forth with some of the posters on here, on my own thread in the new build form (where my design was knocked quite a bit).

 

To answer your original question, there is one simple answer. You have to be good at sales. You can design the most brilliant houses but if you can't sell them to your clients then they're not getting built. Sometimes its as simple as laying out the rationale for your design choices, other times its going to be make your clients realise that what they want vs what they need are 2 separate things.

 

I also agree firmly with the advice on this thread that people who want to self build often do so because they can't find anything on the general market that meets their needs. Which means hundreds of properties viewed, rejected and through that process - usually a good list of what works and what doesn't for them. If you automatically assume that people don't know what they want and they should go with what you're recommending - you've lost before even getting started.

 

You may find the odd example of someone who will go with a completely new design, but people are people and confirmation bias is a real thing. They will want to work with someone who gives them what they want, calls them brilliant and praises their 'design nous'.

 


Thanks Indy, by the way I was not thinking directly about your thread when I made this thread at all and in no way meant to drag you in. I would like to improve my customer experience irl, and I also get more out of the process if I am able to give more input.


I really think that’s a great point. You have to sell the idea. Now I am the worst salesperson there is, I tell people quite brashly what I think. It’s certainly something I’m working on! To make them think the good ideas are theirs is a skill I only seem to manage in work meetings and with my family lol.


 

also thanks again for taking the criticism so well, and you know, sticking with your guns I do respect that and hope it pays off genuinely.

 

 

 

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39 minutes ago, CharlieKLP said:

You have to sell the idea.

The thing that appears to be missing from all these posts is mention of the third and ruling party in these designs. The one that has the ultimate say.... the Planning Officer.

 

We had our view and requirements,. The achitect added in the well... have you thought of this or that etc and presents a plan that we can try. He adds "it may work if the local planner is busy but we may need plan B". ... we used plan B.

A good architect also needs to be able to sell to the client that he understands the clients requirements but needs to be able to work the planning process for the best interest of the client.

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1 hour ago, CharlieKLP said:


I really think that’s a great point. You have to sell the idea. Now I am the worst salesperson there is, I tell people quite brashly what I think. It’s certainly something I’m working on! To make them think the good ideas are theirs is a skill I only seem to manage in work meetings and with my family lol.

 

Getting good at sales sounds much easier than it actually is. Some of the best sales people I've known don't do any active selling and certainly none of the pushy double glazing tactics. You start by building trust, showing that you understand the client, identify their pain points and then propose the solution. Your solution may not be the only solution, but if it resolves their problem by being in the right place at the right time (and roughly at the right cost), the client will usually be tripping over themselves to give you their money.

 

There's all the usual psychology stuff around EQ, emotional intelligence, empathy, building and nurturing relationships, giving more than taking out - some of which may not directly apply to a transactional relationship like the one with architects, as they're usually engaged for a singular purpose.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Indy said:

 

 

 

Getting good at sales sounds much easier than it actually is. Some of the best sales people I've known don't do any active selling and certainly none of the pushy double glazing tactics. You start by building trust, showing that you understand the client, identify their pain points and then propose the solution. Your solution may not be the only solution, but if it resolves their problem by being in the right place at the right time (and roughly at the right cost), the client will usually be tripping over themselves to give you their money.

 

There's all the usual psychology stuff around EQ, emotional intelligence, empathy, building and nurturing relationships, giving more than taking out - some of which may not directly apply to a transactional relationship like the one with architects, as they're usually engaged for a singular purpose.

 

 


Well no, but I ordered that book @Thedreamer recommended and it looks like a start. While I’m never going to charm anyone, I certainly am very happy to talk to people about design. 
 

Also, I’m helped by a lot of ‘non pushy’ type sales and marketing people. Maybe we just need them to sell the design side more. Being sales types, they don’t understand or care for the *value* of design, only material and tangible things.

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3 hours ago, Gone West said:

programmes where people want to change the layout of their houses to create these spaces.

Watches one at my Mother's a while back. People looking at flats in the sun.

They loved the view from one of the balconies, was nothing special, but probably better than wherever they crawled out from.

Wish they had filmed it at head height, when sitting in a chair. They may have realised that all they see is a concrete wall. (expletive deleted)ing moron architect.

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Lmao

 

love that show, Place in the Sun? Jeff and Linda are looking for a villa for 10k in Spain, Jeff is a fat man with a big red nose, Linda is a leathery skinned woman, they are both civil servants.

 

they are shown a villa with sea views and a pool.

 

”it’s a bit too Spanish for us”.
voiceover tells us Jeff and Linda are still looking. End credits.

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13 minutes ago, CharlieKLP said:

”it’s a bit too Spanish for us”.
voiceover tells us Jeff and Linda are still looking. End credits

Offer them your creative solutions.

Can get a half decent holiday mobile home on Canvey Island for that. They have pulled down Shellhaven Refinery now, so lovely views of East London.

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  • 1 month later...

We need good architects who can build a wow house like older houses . I walked down expensive roads and don’t see beauty. I know several with lovely interiors., boxy exteriors. Look at awards etc . Those 100k houses or perfect house tv series show the cost of build and value of design, but they are so supported by the series. 
our small group don’t feel architects think enough about  our needs . 
Let’s see how good my architect is at problem solving.

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