vk108

pros and cons of below shading options

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hi,

 

We are looking for shading options for my new build. Can some one help me with pros and cons of below attached ides please. We are looking to reduce overheating in large south face glazing

 

 

 

horizontal shade.jpg

roller blinds.jpg

 

Blinds.jpg

Edited by vk108
edit picture

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 

can you give some details about what the products are? 

Thanks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, vk108 said:

We are looking for shading options for my new build.

What stage are you at with your new build?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of external shutters or blinds. Shutters would be more robust in windy conditions.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first thought would be to reduce the amount of glazing as a wall be be cheaper and more thermally efficient without glare. If the architect is any good you will still have loads of natural light and the place will still look sexy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, vk108 said:

Hi @PeterStarck, We are at planning stage at the moment

As it's not retrofit I would design in hidden external blinds or shutters but if the cost is okay I would rather consider something like SageGlass like I believe @NSS used.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, PeterStarck said:

As it's not retrofit I would design in hidden external blinds or shutters but if the cost is okay I would rather consider something like SageGlass like I believe @NSS used.

 

Just had a look at the SageGlass site. Very impressive.  Any idea of the per m2 cost?  It looks jolly expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr Punter said:

 

Just had a look at the SageGlass site. Very impressive.  Any idea of the per m2 cost?  It looks jolly expensive.

I've no idea I'm afraid, @NSS is the expert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr Punter said:

Just had a look at the SageGlass site. Very impressive.  Any idea of the per m2 cost?  It looks jolly expensive.

 

Note that Sageglass, electrochromic glass that tints on demand, is for solar control not privacy. At nighttime, if the interior is illuminated everyone will see in easily.

 

This thread gives some more background…

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's not cheap, but it is very effective, and has the added bonus that you can still see out of the windows even when fully tinted. As mentioned, not a privacy solution at night when lights are on inside, but we have a fair bit of south-facing glazing and SageGlass does a fantastic job of controlling solar gain. Not sure of current pricing but budget for circa £1k per square metre (excluding frames) and a bit more if any of your glass is (like ours) irregular shapes.

Edited by NSS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, NSS said:

It's not cheap, but it is very effective, and has the added bonus that you can still see out of the windows even when fully tinted. As mentioned, not a privacy solution at night when lights are on inside, but we have a fair bit of south-facing glazing and SageGlass does a fantastic job of controlling solar gain. Not sure of current pricing but budget for circa £1k per square metre (excluding frames) and a bit more if any of your glass is (like ours) irregular shapes.

think you would have to tell your insurance co that you had them fitted at that price and wait for poke in the eye with the burnt stick when they say how much your premium is going up by 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, scottishjohn said:

think you would have to tell your insurance co that you had them fitted at that price and wait for poke in the eye with the burnt stick when they say how much your premium is going up by 

So long as the insured (rebuild) value is correct they couldn't give a damn, and I could argue that as we never open a window (and hence cannot leave one open accidentally) our house is more secure than many.

Edited by NSS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, NSS said:

So long as the insured (rebuild) value is correct they couldn't give a damn, and I could argue that as we never open a window (and hence cannot leave one open accidentally) our house is more secure than many.

I was more thinking about the accidental cricket ball  that no one owns up to hitting or throwing 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, scottishjohn said:

I was more thinking about the accidental cricket ball  that no one owns up to hitting or throwing 

Howzat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, NSS said:

Howzat!

 

There'd be a certain irony if a cricket ball went through the oval window.....

 

 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't Trump that ^

 

I'm in a fairly similar position and am planning on low g glass (0.3) so most of the solar energy is blocked by the glazing. We have ~54m2 facing SW with minimal natural external shading. As contingency, should the combination of glazing choice and use of ASHP with cooling mode + MVHR with duct coolers result in too many over-heating days (we generally are happy at mid 20s) then we will fit external shading (Brise soleil) which we are ensuring we have suitable fixings for should they be required. An alternative we may use on the ground floor is a sail type shade but need to think a bit more about location of exterior support post(s) for that. Although you can model the expected gains, there are a lot of factors to consider and you may not really know the degree of over-heating until you experience it - hence our contingencies.

 

Personally not a fan of exterior shutters though they would probably be the most effective option. Electrochromatic glass I really like but my wife says no - she has a hang-up that she's seen it in office environments so can't get past it being more of a commercial solution. And that's before we think about cost!

 

Interior blinds of course will also provide a small degree of help, not a huge amount, but maybe in combination with other measures that may make things bearable.

 

Good luck - so many options and so many costs 🙂

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Adam2 said:

Can't Trump that ^

 

I'm in a fairly similar position and am planning on low g glass (0.3) so most of the solar energy is blocked by the glazing. We have ~54m2 facing SW with minimal natural external shading. As contingency, should the combination of glazing choice and use of ASHP with cooling mode + MVHR with duct coolers result in too many over-heating days (we generally are happy at mid 20s) then we will fit external shading (Brise soleil) which we are ensuring we have suitable fixings for should they be required. An alternative we may use on the ground floor is a sail type shade but need to think a bit more about location of exterior support post(s) for that. Although you can model the expected gains, there are a lot of factors to consider and you may not really know the degree of over-heating until you experience it - hence our contingencies.

 

Personally not a fan of exterior shutters though they would probably be the most effective option. Electrochromatic glass I really like but my wife says no - she has a hang-up that she's seen it in office environments so can't get past it being more of a commercial solution. And that's before we think about cost!

 

Interior blinds of course will also provide a small degree of help, not a huge amount, but maybe in combination with other measures that may make things bearable.

 

Good luck - so many options and so many costs 🙂

 

Just bear in mind that there are times of the year when Solar Gain is good to have. Blocking 70% all year round may reduce the chance of overheating but also means you may need to have heating on when it wouldn't otherwise be necessary. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed it is a bit of a loss. I think regular triple glazing will be in the region of .5 to .6g so not as extreme as it may sound going to .3 + the heating requirement (exc solar gain) seems to be a pretty low requirement so for my situation I think this feels like the right balance. Every situation is so different and so many considerations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now