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Does concrete kill lawn grass - can't establish an lawn edge

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My gravel drive is edged with bricks sat on a concrete footing.  The lawn grass that is over the concrete has died and been replaced once.  It establishes ok but then as the roots get longer and reach the concrete it turns yellow (after which last time it died off).

 

It is like the concrete is poison to the grass. 

 

Looking for ideas please on how to get this grass to stay alive please.

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It’s not dying due to the concrete, it’s just too thin to support the root bed 

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I've exactly the same issue on my curved front path.

 

SAM_8253

 

Drives SWMBO nuts so I've left it like it...

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There is very little you can do about this, you need the concrete for the edge but the grass cannot establish roots in such shallow soil.  If you look around most places have the same.  Just live with it for now and the grass may knit across a bit in time but it will always be a slightly balder patch than the rest.

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Possibly exacerbated by the very dry summer we had? See how it goes next year.

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What about tapping a vertical edging in at the inner edge of the haunch, then fill the 'trough' you have created with the same gravel.

 

You could use something such as slates or edging tiles.

 

I suspect that the concrete, in addition to taking up rootspace, may also be sucking any water that does get there away - just as the soil always dries out at the bottom of walls.There might be a benefit in painting the concrete with some sort of paint-on-DPM, or even lining with plastic sheet.

 

Another thing you could try would be to grow something that flops over the edge, such as one of the hardy ground cover flowery cushion things your grandma had along the edge of her path, and create a narrow border there. Have a look around the locality. I'm trying to remember the name of the one with bluey-purple flowers that we still have, but I can't rmember the name. This one: (update: aubretia)

 

ground-cover-blue.jpg.78f9ef0d6e048b01e12caef0f89cb0a7.jpg

 

I guess that something Alpine or Rockery might match the conditions. Or you could even use something like Thyme, or a creeping conifer.

 

Or what about planting it in a deep gutter set into the ground if you need to keep control? 

 

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pmapinterest/border-plants/?lp=true

 

F

 

Edited by Ferdinand
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Cheers all, yep the soil depth is thin on that edge I just assumed the roots would try to spread out and fine the deeper soil.

I'll give the concrete painting a go in one place and try again too.

 

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As already stated, it's the shallowness of the soil level which is not enough to firmly establish grass.

ALSO bear in mind that concrete may retain heat in sunshine / hot weather, and it effectively burns out the edges. Quite a common problem. 

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yes the lime in the cement will not be good for growth ,but that will change over time as it washs out

I made my lawn edging exactly the same to save having to use strimmer --but cut back the cement when still not fully set closer to brick edging. so i had full brick depth 

but i did make soil level at lot higher ,basically 10mm below brick level and did not have all that gravel rubble ,then turfed it -

If seeding i would have filled soil right up to brick level -seeded and rolled --

the gravel +rubble  will drain very quick in dry times compared to rest of area i can see in picture

  the fact that the level of the turf seems to be below the brick level is amplifying the lack of soil  for roots 

maybe top fill the grass with fine compost  and raise up the turf  level is simple answer now

 grass will grow up through it .

not as though its a bowling green --or a lawn  its just grass  ,

IF  it is lawn type grass then  not cut short enough 

,thats why its so coarse looking --but sort out the level before cutting shorter or you will kill it.

shorter you cut it the more watering it will need.

you could always  convert a thin strip next to it into a border?

 

 

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