pocster

Ceiling plasterboard

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I was going to use standard plasterboard for this . But I’d like additional sound proofing ( not worried about insulation as warm roof above ) .

Undoubtedly when I call my builders merchants they won’t have a clue and will suggest ‘thick’ plasterboard or double board it . I’m specifically thinking about bathroom and ensuite - so not sure if moisture resistance is an issue aswell .

Any advice welcome ! 

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Hello Pocster,

For any "damp" room such as a bathroom or utility room etc. I would always plan on using a foil backed board for the ceiling. I havent come across any acoustic board that has a foil backing so can only suggest a couple of "work-arounds (none of which are perfect).

1. Install a 500 guage vapour control layer (with all joints and edges taped) above a standard 15mm acoustic board, but this will still run the small risk of moisture getting on the back / top side of the board.

2. Use an acoustic board such as the Gyproc Soundbloc MR that has moisture resistant additives added to its core as part of its manufacture. This will have an improved moisture resistance over a standard board, as well as the acoustic benefits. This type of board is intended for moisture rather than movement of vapour, but will have improved performance over a standard board.

Without wishing to to tell you how to such eggs, bear in mind that any recessed lights or unsealed penetrations for extract fans etc. in the ceiling will render a foil backing or other solution pretty useless.

Also, dont think that accoustic insulation and sound insulation are one and the same. Typically, in a ceiling both would be a rock or mineral wool roll or batt, but different products can and do do different jobs. So dont write off the option of using an acoustic insulant in the ceiling void, particularly if there are going to be penetrations for lights etc.

Doubleboarding could be an option, but do consider the additional weight. If you do opt for this option, then stagger all joints and ensure the boards are very tightly butted together to get the best performance.

Kind Regards,

Matt.

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You have to decide exactly what board you want. Bathrooms should have moisture resistance.

 

http://www.mgmtimber.co.uk/images/SheetMaterials/plasterboard-types-mgm.jpg

 

But the chances are your builders merchant will only have around 5/6 options, at which point you decide if its worth the extra performance.

 

Edited by bassanclan
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We had several different types of plasterboard used, green, pink etc bathrooms all done in the green and all ceilings double sheeted , outside walls done with the 37.5mm insulated pb 

apparently there’s a shortage just now of the insulated stuff and insulation in general, my SIL who is a QS was talking about it last night, it seems a fire in a factory in Croatia or some such place which makes some of the components that go into insulation has caused the shortage.

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1 hour ago, pocster said:

I was going to use standard plasterboard for this . But I’d like additional sound proofing ( not worried about insulation as warm roof above )

 

is this noise from the outside breaking in, or noise from rooms above?

 

look below as some of the different densities of plasterboard.

 

 

If its external in, this is what i am doing for reduce noise in bedrooms from aircraft noise

 

  • 100-150mm PIR
  • 22mm roof board
  • 200-250mm I-Joists
  • min 200mm porous insulation within the cavity.
  • 2 x 15mm Soundbloc (or similar) of resilient bars

image.png.905bebebd4f079a68a76efb07b07275c.png

Edited by Moonshine
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5 minutes ago, Moonshine said:

 

is this noise from the outside breaking in, or noise from rooms above?

I'm not looking for 100% noise reduction. More interested in stopping noise transferring from neighbouring rooms such as music/tv etc.

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1 minute ago, pocster said:

I'm not looking for 100% noise reduction. More interested in stopping noise transferring from neighbouring rooms such as music/tv etc.

 

so its the sound insulation of walls you want?

 

O.k, min 50mm fluffy stuff (porous insulation) in the cavity, and 2 layers of 15mm dense board (min 12 kg/m2) either side, and if you want more, mount this board on resilient bars.

 

If you want event more acoustic performance, ditch the single stud and use a staggered stud

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Just now, Moonshine said:

 

so its the sound insulation of walls you want?

 

O.k, min 50mm fluffy stuff (porous insulation) in the cavity, and 2 layers of 15mm dense board (min 12 kg/m2) either side, and if you want more, mount this board on resilient bars.

 

If you want event more acoustic performance, ditch the single stud and use a staggered stud

Yeah I've done that for the walls. I just *assume* to insulate the ceiling from noise would be worth the effort and cost....

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Just now, pocster said:

I just *assume* to insulate the ceiling from noise would be worth the effort and cost....

 

to reduce it from the rooms above? or due to flanking noise via ceiling void from the room to the side?

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5 minutes ago, Moonshine said:

 

to reduce it from the rooms above? or due to flanking noise via ceiling void from the room to the side?

No rooms above just next to each other ; so flanking

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Just now, pocster said:

No rooms above just next to each other ; so flanking

 

If the separating wall between the two goes up to roof level / joist, then it will be o.k. as below,

image.png.50f2805aca0dd34afd37b55fa730a536.png

 

However if the wall runs perpendicular to the direction of the joists then you will have potential flanking over the top of the wall.

 

Do you know what arrangement you have?

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Just now, Moonshine said:

 

If the separating wall between the two goes up to roof level / joist, then it will be o.k. as below,

image.png.50f2805aca0dd34afd37b55fa730a536.png

 

However if the wall runs perpendicular to the direction of the joists then you will have potential flanking over the top of the wall.

 

Do you know what arrangement you have?

Perpendicular 😶

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Just now, pocster said:

Perpendicular 😶

 

No biggie, at the head of the wall just fill the gaps between the joists full with porous insulation, and use the same plasterboard arrangement for the ceilings as you did for the walls.

 

 

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Can I ask why soundproofing is your concern when from your description you are boarding the ceiling with a warm roof above. 

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3 minutes ago, ProDave said:

Can I ask why soundproofing is your concern when from your description you are boarding the ceiling with a warm roof above. 

In each room there are tv's and also speakers for whole house audio.

My assumption ( not tested yet! ) is that you really don't want to hear the music/tv in the next room.

Perhaps the solution is as simple as dense plasterboard for the ceiling....

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So it's insulation in the wall between the 2 bedrooms you need to concentrate on. Even perhaps making them independent studs for each wall?  I can't see the ceilings are going to be a big contribution in sound travelling room to room?

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6 minutes ago, ProDave said:

So it's insulation in the wall between the 2 bedrooms you need to concentrate on. Even perhaps making them independent studs for each wall?  I can't see the ceilings are going to be a big contribution in sound travelling room to room?

Ok

I have double studded and staggered the walls with insulation . I just assumed ( there’s that word again ) some sound will travel via the ceiling . It’s hard to test even if I plasterboarded the ceilings and wired the speakers as the rooms have no doors .

So didn’t want SWMBO complaining later ..... 

 

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1 hour ago, pocster said:

I'm not looking for 100% noise reduction. More interested in stopping noise transferring from neighbouring rooms such as music/tv etc.


Saw a great test on this sort of thing, the chap made a frame like a big picture frame and stuffed it with layers of material. He then just put a canvas on the front, it was far better at stopping noise than the boards they sell. A bit of old carpet would do the same. So perhaps rather than buying expensive board why not carpet the ceiling then use normal plater board 🙂

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38 minutes ago, ProDave said:

Can I ask why soundproofing is your concern. 

 

To muffle the screams.

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31 minutes ago, Onoff said:

 

To muffle the screams.

Then stop f ing screaming ! Enjoy the torture !!

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What finish are you having skim?

 

I didn't think MR boards were designed to be skimmed over?

If you read the MI's

 

@nod ?

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Just now, Oz07 said:

What finish are you having skim?

 

I didn't think MR boards were designed to be skimmed over?

If you read the MI's

 

@nod ?

The plan was skim yeah ...

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I'm sure MR boards aren't supposed to take a skim. I've never used anything other than acoustic or wallboard (skimmed) in a bathroom and never had any issues with sagging or the board breaking down before. Happy to be told i'm wrong but suspect its for tape and filled jobs where board choice is more critical

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