Moonshine

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About Moonshine

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  1. personally no, i would suggest that you ask for clarification.
  2. My reading of that is that it is no digging of a hole (groundworks) for the foundations to go into. Also do you know if that specification of foundation is suitable for the site and ground conditions its going on?
  3. Check inclusions and exclusions, I bet that figure does not include ground works and foundations.
  4. Do you think that Is this the cause of my hypnagogic jerking my wife complains about?
  5. Round this way, minimum GIA's for 1 bed 2 person flats are about 50m2. unless that house has a GIA of ~200m2, which it doesn't look like it has, four flats as you indicate, would be a squash.
  6. Party walls and floors thickness - these will have to be considered / beefed up to meet the minimum requirements of Approved Document E for airborne and impact (floors) isolation. Also factor in that come near completion you will likely have to have sound tests done, unless you go down a Robust Detail route.
  7. I looked at those but thought they would take up too much space, then looked at the bolt down solution (though i am still at the planning stage) https://www.forterra.co.uk/bison-precast-concrete/retaining-walls/the-standard-range/2-5m-retaining-wall These are about £300 - £350 + VAT a pop, without the installation or associated materials. @EverHopefull don't worry there is usually a solution, but takes a bit of digging to find the right one which is cost effective. Just think about the poor developer & SE that got faced with this challenge!
  8. tbh the initial design for the house was a modern take on the surroundings incorporating some features, which the planners didn't like a half measures hybrid (although the officer indicated that they did initially). Their view was either build exactly the same, or their preference go contemporary and go for it. So with the switch to a contemporary house design is a new thing, and tbh not sure how its going to sit in the site. Hopefully my architect can come back with something that works for the site, works with the site constraints, and looks good.
  9. Agree on that, and makes for a very nice design. @Pete please tell me there is a roof terrace at first floor, obscured to the neighbours due to the side walls.
  10. @JSHarris may have some figures as if i recall correctly he did a 40m wall, that was circa 2.5m http://www.mayfly.eu/2013/07/part-eight-the-wall/
  11. Options on sound insulation are like arseholes, every one has one.
  12. Planning factors have come into play, that mean it may be advantageous to build a contemporary house, rather that a more traditional style. I am not a massive fan of contemporary houses and too many of them look like a white cube, with a bit of wooden cladding stuck on to break up the white. Anyone got any views on what features add to make a contemporary house stand out, rather than just another white washed cube. I suppose bit will be easier to build 😆
  13. Depends on the rainfall rate, i have done a fair bit of assessment of rain noise while is aus, as they use metal roofs a lot. The CSR red book has some advice and rainfall reduction values based on a number of metal roof build ups.
  14. It may not be on the top of your list, but you may want to consider rain noise and if you are concerned about it, to control it. Though if its a holiday house it may add to the ambience