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Linseed Paint. Anyone used it?

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Have been reading about Linseed paint as a natural alternative to oil based paints from the petrochemical industry. It all sounds very good. Most importantly it seems to need very little maintenance. 

To protect from uv light you need to use a colour version of the paint rather than the clear oil version though you can just add a little white to the clear if you so desire.

As we are looking at oak windows we need the uv protection to prevent them going silver. However, it seems a shame to cover up oak with paint! Any experience out there?

Ideally we would like very low maintenance without resorting to UPVC windows and we are not sure about aluminium cladding.

 

https://www.linseedpaint.com/

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think thats the sort of stuff my dad used about 70years ago --pity hes dead now  or i could ask him 

I remember him saying best lasting colour for outside woodwork was green 

 

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It is, apparently, still used widely in Scandinavian countries.

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Last year I tried a natural oil teak woodstain (am I allowed to mention the brand on the forum?) on some south-facing window frames, for which treatments of both water-based and oil-based stains had failed previously. To date this is still holding well (far better than water-based, which is perhaps not a surprise) - it penetrates rather than forms a film. They do a clear (not so good UV protection) and slightly tinted (better UV protection), containing sunflower oil, soya oil, thistle oil and linseed oil. Overall I am happy with how it's performing but difficult to comment further as only one year on. I did not however enjoy cleaning the brush afterwards - too used to WB these days...

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Feel free to mention the brand.

 

For years I used boiled linseed oil as a dressing on galvanised wire rope standing rigging.  It seemed to hold up really well to severe exposure.  The only real issue with the stuff is that it takes ages to dry properly, and I believe that modern linseed oil finishes incorporate a drying agent.  Whether the drying agent impacts the longevity I don't know, but I suspect it might.

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24 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

Feel free to mention the brand.

 

For years I used boiled linseed oil as a dressing on galvanised wire rope standing rigging.  It seemed to hold up really well to severe exposure.  The only real issue with the stuff is that it takes ages to dry properly, and I believe that modern linseed oil finishes incorporate a drying agent.  Whether the drying agent impacts the longevity I don't know, but I suspect it might.

The brand is Osmo, and yes this does apparently include a drying agent, although it still takes a while before it's properly dry. I also tried and liked their decking oil, which I found out the hard way also seems to take longer than I thought to dry thoroughly...

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I used an old fashioned mix of linseed oil and something on my deck, it looked stunning but the uv killed it and it needed re doing very quickly. 

I am now doing my cedar cladding with osmo uv oil, very expensive but so far I am impressed how well the water beads and runs off. 

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If anyone wants to ask questions about linseed paint, and it comes in lots of colours, there is an active facebook page. 

 

I like the idea that it is natural and chemical free. Would just like some feedback from users. There is a comment on Facebook about it being used on Chatsworth House.

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1 hour ago, Russell griffiths said:

If your worried about chemicals, can you not just use water based. 

 

Worth reading this MSDS:

 

MSDS Dihydrogen Monoxide.pdf

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27 minutes ago, Russell griffiths said:

What is that used in @JSHarris

 

 

Dangerous stuff, it has an LD50 (the dose that will kill 50% of those who take it) of about 6 litres.

 

The really scary bit is that dihydrogen monoxide is supplied to households and comes out of taps...

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Yep, you need to handle dihydrogen monoxide with great care; it has the highest pH of any acid.

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I find it far easier to stick to drinking jack Daniels and coke. 

 

Im afraid you got me @JSHarris with your big words, I am but a simple chap. 

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4 minutes ago, Russell griffiths said:

I find it far easier to stick to drinking jack Daniels and coke. 

 

Im afraid you got me @JSHarris with your big words, I am but a simple chap. 

 

It's a bit of a joke, @Russell griffiths, aimed at those who suffer from chemical phobia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_parody

 

By the way, the main flavouring ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid, the stuff used in various "rust converter" products (it changes red ferric oxide into black ferric phosphate).

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1 hour ago, JSHarris said:

By the way, the main flavouring ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid, the stuff used in various "rust converter" products (it changes red ferric oxide into black ferric phosphate).

And according to the internet can clean your bog, patio, coins, cure and give you cancer, cause or reduce obesity, help you concentrate and get a pretty, singing, girlfriend.

Ok, I made some of that up.

It does go well with a curry though.

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I've just checked the LD50 for Jack Daniel's

 

Assuming that it's the ethyl alcohol in Jack Daniel's that may kill you, then the LD50 is lower than I'd have thought, about 585ml.  That's not much over half a litre bottle, so it's unsurprising that alcohol poisoning seems relatively commonplace in A&E. 

 

Mind you, people seem to vary a great deal when it comes to the effect of alcohol.  I shared a house with four other students years ago, and one of them would be pretty pissed after half a pint of beer, and completely unable to stand after a pint.  This was consistent, and yet it didn't stop him drinking, it just meant we always ended up carrying him home from the SU bar.

 

 

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Coke/cola is also really good for softening denim in the wash, too.

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