Dee J

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About Dee J

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  1. If that's the sensor there already then all you need is a blank faceplate - normally available in most accessory styles. Drill and fit your sensor.
  2. That looks like a very common loop-in arrangement for a ceiling rose, and you'll need to reproduce those connections in a safe and appropriate way, using some othe connection method, maybe wago connections or choc-block terminal strip. If done neatly you might be able to conceal those connections within the new light fitting, or sometimes I resort to fitting a circular drywall box into the ceiling to contain the connections.
  3. Seems to be a plan to achieve a certain level of lighting around each room, using a minimum of lighting fixtures. But, lacking info on furnishing plans, useage patterns, and surface finishes. Equally seems to lack any concept of aesthetic. Looks more suited to commercial spaces.
  4. Aluminium or plastic windows often have a thermal break between inside and outside parts. Outer frame in contact with external building skin. Inner frame with internal building skin.
  5. Typically a single two-storey domestic residence is one 'fire zone' and thus does not require fire rated lights downstairs. If your house can have open stairs and doors without automatic closers then its one fire zone. Taller buildings, flats etc may well require fire rated fittings. Hth.
  6. One inline fan, y-join, two anti backdraft flaps, job done.
  7. Standard electrician's solution is some left over bonding coat plaster. Out of date bonding coat sets really quickly, so you don't have to hold the box in place very long before it's fixed.
  8. Slate is remarkably good. Just basic mid-grey Chinese slate with a matt surface. Unsealed it just seemed to work. Heat and stain resistant and any scratches seem to disappear. Main work surface in my previous house, still looked good after 10 years.
  9. A lot depends on the style of the house and build, and how much thought was given to cable routes through the structure. Consumer unit placed in the far corner of an outer wing eats up cable, as do impenetrable steels forcing tortuous routes. A wired thermostat in every room adds up too, as do wired multi-way switched lighting circuits.
  10. On friendly terms with any trades people? Get your friendly carpet fitter or whatever to sign in and give it a once-over and some discrete photography....
  11. Dee J

    Warm roof insulation

    If you have a void between two layers of insulation, do you ventilate it? If so do you ventilate to the cold side, with heat loss issues, or the warm side, with condensation issues? Or try to keep the void airtight? Isn't insulation simpler in one thickness?
  12. Rather than find the studs, locate the plasterboard screws with a powerful magnet. Far more precise.
  13. If you're on really good terms with your neighbour then I can't see how the party wall act would apply: The Party Wall etc Act 1996 provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls, boundary walls and excavations near neighbouring buildings. A building owner proposing to start work covered by the Act must give adjoining owners notice of their intentions in the way set down in the Act. Seeing as it's prime function is to manage relationships and avoid disputes. If you're both entirely happy about the development and there's planning consent then what else is needed. But I'm amazed your neighbour is so chill.
  14. So you want to attach steel to your neighbours property without a formal agreement? Sounds like a shaky proposition to me. And surely the purpose of using the steel is to avoid connection with the neighbours property and should be self supporting.
  15. See a lot of concrete panel builds in the Netherlands. Typically looks like passive slab, precast wall, floor and roof panels (with service conduits included). External insulation, then decorative cladding. Quite what the economics are I don't know but looks to be fast build. Think some of it might be just a culture/tradition thing. Many southern European countries use a lot of cast in situ stuff... we tend to use pre-fab timberframe +brick cladding. Each system has a very different skill mix, but all seem to produce reasonable builds at not dissimilar prices.