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A Strong Drink and a Peer Group

Douglas Adams, in "Life, the Universe and Everything", that Arthur Dent expressed a need for "a strong drink and a peer group".

 

That is what this Gardening Blog is for - my need for the same thing because my knowledge about gardening is patchy, just like my garden. Buildhub cannot supply a strong drink, but I am hoping that the peer group can help me get to grips with the garden I inherited last year. The idea has been around for a couple of months, and is now in a position start.

 

We talk a lot about building here, but not so much about all the aspects of the settings of our houses - planning, clearance, climate, fencing, groundworks, trees, plants, soil, hedges and all the rest.

 

That is what I hope can get a bit more coverage and conversation here, in all its aspects.

 

This is a group blog, with potentially as many authors as wish to contribute, so if you have a question, or a project, or a garden you have liked or a plant you have spotted or grown, we can sign you up as an author or do a one-off contribution. If you would like to involved as a one-off or regular, do send me a Private Message.

 

For my first question - what is the purple plant in the middle of the piccie below, and is it a weed or a specimen? Do I take it out or leave it in? Comments are most welcome. Plant identification is one of my weak points.

 

AACB7A0B-E7B4-4C65-839B-A0C507EEA47F.thumb.jpeg.ec9c219d8815f8afdcfafccd3fddab0e.jpeg

 

* The header picture is of the Dill and Watercress in my microveg "Green Wall" - which has been one my new projects during the lockdown period, which I will post about more as things go on.

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Possibly it's a Viper's Bugloss which we have in our wild flower patch. If it is, then it could be called a weed but we call them wild flowers. If it's covered in bees then I'm probably right as they are a bee magnet.

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I am actually wondering whether it is a traditional wallflower.

 

They are noticeably shallow rooted.

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Not sure what it is, at first I thought it was nepeta but on closer inspection the leaves are wrong 4101BC9A-146B-4010-8F05-BFE63B0B8D15.thumb.jpeg.aa50b6ee8569e21dcd628140e2c669c4.jpeg

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Purple Toadflax?  If it is  I can't take any credit; just testing a friends plant ID app before I download one myself 😉

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7 hours ago, Ferdinand said:

I am actually wondering whether it is a traditional wallflower.

 

They are noticeably shallow rooted.

 

Has it got a spotty stem a bit like a snakes skin?

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Ferdinand

Posted (edited)

16 hours ago, Christine Walker said:

Not sure what it is, at first I thought it was nepeta but on closer inspection the leaves are wrong 4101BC9A-146B-4010-8F05-BFE63B0B8D15.thumb.jpeg.aa50b6ee8569e21dcd628140e2c669c4.jpeg

 

I have a small amount of that - and a plague of cats - but I know catmint.

 

I would describe the leaves as "straplike".

 

Thanks.

Edited by Ferdinand

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15 hours ago, Roundtuit said:

Purple Toadflax?  If it is  I can't take any credit; just testing a friends plant ID app before I download one myself 😉

 

I think that's it.


As the RHS say:


"Linaria purpurea is a vigorous perennial with erect stems clad in narrow, grey-green leaves, with purple flowers 1.5cm long in slender terminal racemes in summer and early autumn; often seeds freely."

 

They are right it seeds freely; it's bloody everywhere.

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On 21/07/2020 at 09:03, PeterStarck said:

Possibly it's a Viper's Bugloss which we have in our wild flower patch. If it is, then it could be called a weed but we call them wild flowers. If it's covered in bees then I'm probably right as they are a bee magnet.

I was just about to say that........

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Speedwell - 'wild' Veronica - weeds are only plants in the wrong place, so if you like it leave it alone as a wild flower.

There are many varieties of Veronica, wild (including this & a small creeping one in lawns & grasses) & cultivated (tend to have bigger bushier flower spikes).

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Ian

Posted (edited)

@Ferdinand

Google do an App which is fantastic for auto identification:

 

 

8F76A317-1259-4656-83EF-C3700D8EB706.png
and this is a screen grab from the app after uploading the photo you posted:

 

 

0BCC49A0-F513-478E-A38B-924CEFBF4150.png

Edited by Ian
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Gardening is a full-time, ballache of a job. For 7 months a year it’s trying to strangle you and you have to spend your time stopping it from taking over before you get to improvements. And some people do it every year!  
 

Through a combination of lockdown, great weather and a lack of occupational work I’ve spent more time in my garden this year than in my entire adult life. (That isn’t surprising when you’ve spent 3/4 of that time in back to back terraces and flats). It’s given us some thoughts on some ‘features’ we would like but one thing neither my wife or I can do is visualise a garden we want. Which is in stark contrast to the house where we’ve always been able to see what we wanted. We need to spend the money on someone who knows what they’re doing but finding one of those is not easy. 

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Purple Toadflax? My new app “Seek” says so. Is it right?5FC87018-A882-44D1-BC83-53C686661F4D.thumb.png.337c457fa969f12d33d42a876890b545.pngHowever it doesn’t say whether it’s a weed or not - one person’s weed is another’s wild flower meadow?

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