Roz

Barn floor - does lowering it cost a lot more?

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone, 

 

Thanks a lot for having me I value your feedback! The other question I have been wondering (and need to decide on before applying for planning) is about the groundwork. 

 

The structural report says that it's sound and doesn't need underpinning. However, the barn is quite short. I think it's 4m tall, not at the top of the gable - I couldn't get my tape measure up there. 

It used to have a first floor and has the holes where the beams used to go. We'll be wanting to put the first floor back in. I had originally thought I would raise the first floor so there's more head room downstairs, and upstairs will be fine as we'll have it open to the ridge inside. 

 

However, as we'll be hoping to put on an extension, and will need to be doing some insulation and slab laying in the main barn anyway, would it be better to lower the whole floor level? If you're already doing groundwork, how much extra would I expect to pay if I wanted to lower it 30cm or something? 

 

I think I am leaning towards just raising the first floor level. I personally don't mind the walls being a bit lower than the top of my head, as there's so much extra space that will be open from keeping the roof open. But worried I am missing a trick that might not cost much more! 

 

 

Screen_Shot_2018-01-13_at_15_32_03.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would dig a test hole carefully by hand to investigate what the walls sit on.

 

I caution this because close to us someone bought a barn to convert, and when they started scraping away at the floor is when they found no foundations under the walls and the excavation needed to lower and insulate the floor undermined what little the walls sat on. They ended up knocking down and rebuilding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of interest why are you choosing to renovate rather than rebuild ? I totally understand the desire to renovate but after doing a few in my life and seeing many of my friends do it   i am now of the opinion that rebuild should be seriously considered as a first choice for seriously decrepit  structures. 

1 hour ago, ProDave said:

would dig a test hole carefully by hand to investigate what the walls sit on.

 

Good advice.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As cpd said, 

not wanting to tell you how to suck eggs, but After you get stuck into that shell you will wonder why you didn’t knock it down and start a fresh. 

Got anymore pics. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Cpd said:

Out of interest why are you choosing to renovate rather than rebuild ? I totally understand the desire to renovate but after doing a few in my life and seeing many of my friends do it   i am now of the opinion that rebuild should be seriously considered as a first choice for seriously decrepit  structures. 

Good advice.  

 

11 hours ago, Russell griffiths said:

As cpd said, 

not wanting to tell you how to suck eggs, but After you get stuck into that shell you will wonder why you didn’t knock it down and start a fresh. 

Got anymore pics. 

 

I suppose part of it is that I'm confident we'd get permission to convert it, but not confident we'd get permission to rebuild. It's in a World Heritage Site, but there's precedent for converting barns (similar sized one just across the road).Plus have had good indications from the council. However, on the other hand, others have had a lot of trouble getting permission for affordable home builds. 

 

I know we could apply and change to a conversion if we get rejected, but there is a cost and time factor involved too. 

 

The other reason is that the barn is small, and so is our budget. And whilst it has been said it's cheaper to rebuild, there's size requirements now for minimum sized new builds? Which would push our budget up too (although of course it would be nice to have a bigger house!)

 

Lastly I feel under the impression that 'cheaper to build new' is true if we were to replace with a very simple modern build. But we'd want to add character and interest in some way and feel that would push the budget further. 

 

I suppose I also feel more capable of doing bits and pieces of a conversion ourselves (like repointing) to save money, whereas I'm not sure I would be in a new build.

 

I'm very open to you all refuting these points though, as it will be interesting to know your thoughts! 

Attached some other photos :) Can also attach my sketch up of what we hope to add in an extension.

 

 

Screen_Shot_2018-01-18_at_11_33_21.png

Screen_Shot_2018-01-18_at_11_32_32.png

Screen_Shot_2018-01-13_at_15_47_13.png

Edited by Roz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just the integrity of the structure would have me panicking tbh. 

Find out if you could stick build a new, replacment timber framed dwelling if you reclaim and use the available stone to las the exterior. There would likely be enough there to remanufacture and wrap the current sized building, as well as clad the new extension, so all would look proper and in-keeping. Plus you'd have a comfortable and modern spin with the correct head heights ( subject to ridge height restrictions from the planners ). 

As mentioned, check what lays beneath before even asking another question, but face facts that you'd either have to dig down enough to get 150mm of insulation in and then a thin wooden floating floor, ( to save on depth and cost of a screed ) or apply to raise the ridge height and build over what youve got, eg if the foundations are not sufficient to excavate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now