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Is there any hope?


Imogen
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2 hours ago, Imogen said:

It's 194m2 internal, 258 external excluding outbuilding.

 

Built late 1700s. I have sassins (sp?) from 1795 so some time before that.  Grade B listed (Scottish equivalent of English II*) but head conservation officer said she thought it she be a 'C' (grade II) really and that the dry rot works would be considered a repair rather than alteration as the timbers are being reinstated exactly as is.

 

Property is 2 storey but with one room in the attic.

 

There's also a single storey  stone outbuilding (stable?) attached which is the size of a small cottage. I had intended to convert it at a later date.

 

Then I have to be honest and say I'd be inclined to walk away, sell it for whatever you can get for it and swallow the loss. However, it sounds as though you're determined to find a way through this so my suggestion would be to turn the stable into your temporary home, even if that means spending a few grand that you feel would be better spent on the main house. It doesn't need to be fancy, just safe, dry and warm enough that your health doesn't suffer again this winter, with a loo, shower and basic cooking facilities. You'll need somewhere to stay while the dry rot work is done anyway, and even once that is done there'll be a lot of work (and cost) to get the main house livable.

 

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One additional thought. You say it had been on the market for years before you bought it, and that the conservation officer thought it was listed with higher protection than perhaps is warranted. I therefore wonder whether they would consider delisting it? Faced with the choice between it eventually falling down, or a refurbishment that was sympathetic to the original building but requiring a less demanding treatment may be preferable to the local authority - and significantly less expensive for you.

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I really really hate the way places have a listed status, I would go back to the conservation officer and ask for a site meeting, you need to lay your cards on the table and be really honest. 

That place looks like it’s on the verge of a major collapse, maybe a whole floor, you really shouldn’t be living in it. 

I would push to get it de listed and get more quotes to remove all timber and replace whiteout the constraints of the listing, you could get quotes from more builders instead of the dry rot guys, most of that work is fairly standard work. 

 

As stated previously how about moving out into the outbuildings, you need to be warm and comfortable to be able to concentrate on doing this, your health suffering will not help you finish this. 

 

Under the listing status, if you pull down all the ceilings to do the structural repairs are they going to want all the cornice replaced as original, this could cost you thousands. 

Its not just the structural stuff, you have £50,000 to spend on that place once the structural stuff is done. 

 

Edited by Russell griffiths
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On 17/07/2020 at 21:55, Cpd said:

My experience is with old buildings and renovation and its all costsed me so very much more than expected.... and will continue to absorb all my spare cash for years to come..... but I love it and the life I have chosen and treat the whole thing as a hobby..... an expensive one. 

 

I'd raise this money pit to the ground given the chance...new bathroom and all! Oh, and I don't particularly "love it".

 

?

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On a different path, if it was to fall down could you get consent for a new build, 

whats the plot worth, could you get two on there, sell a plot and build on the other. 

 

Do you you have any outside pics. 

 

I know a particularly affluent developer who lets places fall down on purpose to avoid renovating old rubbish. 

 

It could be time to let this one go, unless you have some sort of desire to keep it, I’m afraid I’m not very sentimental about these over listed buildings. 

Edited by Russell griffiths
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3 minutes ago, Onoff said:

 

I'd raise this money pit to the ground given the chance...new bathroom and all! Oh, and I don't particularly "love it".

 

?

 

If it's a money pit logically you have to fill it up not raise it down? ?

 

I'll refrain from quibbles with direction of travel "raise it down" ??

 

(Serious post after my toast and marmalade)

Edited by Ferdinand
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As I said earlier the main problem might be the affordability test? What earnings multiple will ganks lend on these days?

 

Does the Ecology Building Soc lend in Scotland...

 

https://www.ecology.co.uk/mortgages/residential-mortgages/renovation/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=997612303&utm_adgroup=44837786130&utm_keyword=%2Brenovation %2Bmortgage %2Blenders&gclid=Cj0KCQjw3s_4BRDPARIsAJsyoLOp8HfgCeyhzRbmCPy7qFYs5f0mGu8kHpmJFZOR-pH1pExqqzs_K9oaAnjgEALw_wcB

 

What we lend on

We are experts in providing mortgages for unique renovation projects and we don't have a 'tick box' approach to assessing projects – in many instances, we'll welcome projects that standard lenders may not accept. We will consider:

Thatched properties

Historic or listed buildings

Fire damaged buildings

Non-standard construction types, such as timber framed

Buildings in a poor state of repair.

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48 minutes ago, Ferdinand said:

 

If it's a money pit logically you have to fill it up not raise it down? ?

 

I'll refrain from quibbles with direction of travel "raise it down" ??

 

(Serious post after my toast and marmalade)

 

It swallows money.....in a downward direction.

 

"Raised" in this context is actually a modern bastardisation of "erase". "Razed" I think in some old text.

 

 

 

 

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On 19/07/2020 at 10:35, Mr Punter said:

Having seen the pictures, if this is in a good location could you demolish and rebuild?  With careful planning you could build a near-replica.

Looking at it I would be tempted, in fact, it would probably have a major collapse about... now.

 

It looks like @Imogen could bulldoze this and start out of the ground pretty quickly. Can we see some exterior photos please.

 

As soon as you try and do "conservation" or "listed works", people just add a few ££ to the sign as they know they have you over the barrel.

 

The way I see it I would ask for a Building Control officer to come to site and visit you, maybe see if they would come out with a planning officer too. 

 

Don't read this next bit if you just want the advice, but here is some very recent anecdotal evidence of how things go.

 

On Saturday I started to take up the floor in parts of my original house, now the extension is done I am moving into getting the adjacent rooms all sorted out, the old kitchen, which will be a dining room had a hell of a T&G floorboard floor, full of holes and just a mess. Opted to remove this, taking care not to damage my brand new wiring and gas and water pipes etc. it took the best part of a day to remove it all, get the wood out the house, and start to make good. This was one small room, it was a horrible days work, it was filthy, it was dangerous and it was just not nice. The point here is that your WHOLE house needs this doing. Either you do it, in which case you are exposed to the danger and filth etc. or you pay someone, who will want paid acceptably to take on your dirty work. You could rent a 14ton digger for the weekend and sort this yourself! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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