Sjk

Thoughts on the external appearance?

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I seem incapable of fiddling and completely revising designs.

 

I've quickly knocked this up, I think it has potential, but its not quite there. Love the contrast of dark grey and white, but I fear with such a large about of "dark" it could become over powering.

 

Any thoughts, feedback is hugely appreciated 

 

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Edited by Sjk

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Can you post some photos of neighbouring houses?

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They are typical Victorian. The planning dept would prefer a contemporary design that's far removed from those houses.

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I'm not sure what external texture you have in mind (render?), but if you are keen to maintain contrast (I can see the point), I would probably take this contrasting a step futher and do a WHITE garage door to the left side of the house, to contrast to the dark entrance door on the right. Also the left-hand blind wall (neighbour-facing, I assume) can be rendered white / light (same as the righthand part of house), so you would have some sort of interplay between the two.

 

White window frames to the dark side.

 

A bit like Alice in Wonderland, but with correct materials it can be made fun and attractive! You can then take it even further by planting contrasting soft landscaping elements to blend it in (e.g., white flower shrubs / baskets) against the dark wall and darker intense colours (e.g, plants with dark foliage) againts light-coloured wall. Then it makes the whole lot look conceptual :)

Edited by Bored Shopper
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K-Rend that would often be used doesn't come in dark grey, most houses I see with that sort of colour on them it is an area of dark stained wood or some other cladding, not render.

 

I do like the aspect of the upstairs windows.

 

Not sure the grey works on the end, I think the issue is the grey gable, it might work better hipped, but it would be more expensive and the hip would cut close to the main roof. Or maybe the end could be white and the area around the garage clad in dark grey rather than rendered.

 

A personal thing is I do not like a door flush with the front of a house, I like it to be set back a little ideally if you can or some sort of canopy to keep the rain off. I think in this case if there is space I would like it sunk into the front a little.

 

 

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Agree the door would look much better, I will do that thank you.

 

I was thinking of using a cladding rather than render, but my IT skills are lacking. 

 

Edited by Sjk

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You could consider a red door and garage door. Needn't be a bright red, but something with some colour will tie the two parts of the house together while livening to whole thing up imo.

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I would prefer the massing with the two roofs the same height. 

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I think the proportions are a bit off tbh, it looks tall and slim and the white element has quite a large "forehead" - it doesn't scream "contemporary" to me, if that's what the planners are looking for, I think you might need to push the envelope a bit more - most important thing, do you have a workable floor plan?

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This one was well received by the planners and quite a compromise from the architects original proposal.  A similar form to the next door house but a modern look. The owners have  put planting at the front so the house now looks distinct from the front wall.CIMG1989.thumb.JPG.61050f7d12f5e0c9499e40e32ce931d7.JPG

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The upstairs cladding looks similar to mine - vertical slate. Watch out for lead times if you use Marley vertigo.

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1 hour ago, Ferdinand said:

I would prefer the massing with the two roofs the same height. 

 

I think having them different helps make the two parts distinct, although the difference needn't be so large.

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1 hour ago, the_r_sole said:

I think the proportions are a bit off tbh, it looks tall and slim and the white element has quite a large "forehead" - it doesn't scream "contemporary" to me, if that's what the planners are looking for, I think you might need to push the envelope a bit more - most important thing, do you have a workable floor plan?

 

The floorplan works at the moment, want the option to convert the loft in the future, hence some of the height.

 

They may say that, I would need to talk to them again, its not easy to pin them down.

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31 minutes ago, Sjk said:

 

I think having them different helps make the two parts distinct, although the difference needn't be so large.


As sketched, I think the join is clumsy ... especially that triangle at the top of the wall/

 

That may look different when built.

 

F

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1 hour ago, Sjk said:

 

The floorplan works at the moment, want the option to convert the loft in the future, hence some of the height.

 

They may say that, I would need to talk to them again, its not easy to pin them down.

 

It's not easy to pin them down, but if they've mentioned contemporary before they'll probably want some kind of design to discuss in more depth - at the moment it looks like a pretty average suburban house that has been put together by a house builder, it doesn't really have any personality. The one posted by @Mr Punter, whilst not really to my taste, you can see what they are trying to do with it in terms of fitting it into the existing streetscape and the use of materials etc, might be worth doing a bit more investigation into the local areas and look for design cues there

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