Jump to content

Heatpump in cooling mode


Recommended Posts

27 minutes ago, eniacs said:

This must be hard to police

Must pretty hard, you can't hear mine from about 2m away doing cooling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, eniacs said:

This must be hard to police.

I've a friend who's an acoustics engineer. His company get called in when disputes arise. Local authorities are unlikely to police it, but the risk is that a neighbour complains. Even if you have planning permission, neighbours can allege that the noise is a statutory nuisance. His experience is that local authorities are not well equipped to handle those cases which leads to uncertainty.

Edited by LnP
Link to comment
Share on other sites

>>> This must be hard to police

 

Also, pretty dumb. The UK is hardly likely to end up like the Southern US, where A/C is a big load.

 

And, when the need is greatest - those unusual sunny & hot days, PV generation will be at max and there will be power looking for places to be used up.

 

Sure think about reducing summer solar gain. But you'll likely reduce solar gain the rest of the year too, and therefore increase energy use overall.

 

Guess what, we have more heating days than potential cooling days in the UK. Even in Texas heat and a/c energy uses are fairly balanced:

 

https://www.eia.gov/consumption/residential/reports/2009/state_briefs/pdf/TX.pdf

 

I would love to know who invents these dumb 'rules'.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Alan Ambrose said:

>>> This must be hard to police

 

Also, pretty dumb. The UK is hardly likely to end up like the Southern US, where A/C is a big load.

 

And, when the need is greatest - those unusual sunny & hot days, PV generation will be at max and there will be power looking for places to be used up.

 

Sure think about reducing summer solar gain. But you'll likely reduce solar gain the rest of the year too, and therefore increase energy use overall.

 

Guess what, we have more heating days than potential cooling days in the UK. Even in Texas heat and a/c energy uses are fairly balanced:

 

https://www.eia.gov/consumption/residential/reports/2009/state_briefs/pdf/TX.pdf

 

I would love to know who invents these dumb 'rules'.

 

I think its reasonable to assume that the policy intent was to avoid giving PD rights for air conditioners.  Unlike heat pumps used for heating, these operate for extended hours in the summer when people are likely to be outside and thus more disturbed by the noise.  Furthermore they don't contribute at all to the mitigation of climate change (and therefore there is no reason to give them special treatment), whereas heat pumps used for heating do contribute to the mitigation of climate change.  Without the restriction the anti-heat pump lobby would be able to claim that the rules were making it easy for people to disturb their neighbours enjoyment of the outside in summer, without achieving anything for climate change. 

 

The fact that it isn't actively policed doesn't really matter.  If your neighbour is annoying you in the summer because they are operating their heat pump in cooling mode, then you can complain to your LPA.  If they have installed under PD then its their look out, and they will likely be told to desist from using it in cooling mode  - no need for your LPA or you to prove its a nuisance, your neighbours haven't got pp which is absolute.  If your neighbour isn't annoying you, then they aren't doing any material harm.

 

All in all I would say that this is a sensible policy intent, and the way it has been implemented also sensible,  It allows the violations that matter to be dealt with easily, whilst allowing those that don't matter to be ignored if the LPA choose to do so.

 

Nothing dumb about it at all IMHO, unlike the rule which gives MCS an effective monopoly over heat pump installations under permitted development, which is dumb, anti-competitive and steps well outside the boundaries of what the planning system is supposed to be about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...