NSS

Sageglass live

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Hectic day on site today, so just one pic for now showing side by side panes with one tinted to around 50% and the other untinted. Takes about 3 minutes to tint to this level and about 5 minutes to fully tint (which blocks about 96% of the solar gain). More pics tomorrow.

IMG_20170622_1623143.jpg

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A couple more pic, from inside and outside with the glass in it's fully tinted state. You can see out, but you can't see in.

IMG_20170623_1621042.jpg

IMG_20170623_1622299.jpg

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I do like your build. Looks really nice. And now you can run round the house naked :D 

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32 minutes ago, Barney12 said:

I do like your build. Looks really nice. And now you can run round the house naked :D 

LOL. And more importantly, the SageGlass will now automatically reduce solar gain when we don't need it, but allow it when we do.

 

Okay, it's more expensive than reflective film, but it was noticeable working in the house today just how much cooler it remained.

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That looks brilliant, and not just the glazing.

 

Do you know if it's possible to fit this glazing to a normal window?

 

I'd guess that it's very expensive, but if it can be retrofitted then I think it's something we'd put on our list of things we'd like to change, one day (if it's affordable!).

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Yep, it's pretty expensive, but we got a substantial discount for being the first residential customer in the UK. Not sure how easy it would be to retrofit as you need to run cables from the IGUs, zonal switches and a light sensor back to a control panel. 

 

Oh, and I should add, our frames are Internorm but those being fitted with the SageGlass were supplied unglazed.

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Thanks @NSS.

 

Do you know the detail of how the cables exit the frames? 

 

Presumably the frames must have hidden cable ducts.  Adding additional wiring to the glazing that we'd be thinking of using this glass on would be easy enough, I think, as the upper side of the front gable are close to the under-eaves storage areas, and there is access from there to the service voids that run to the side of the glazing, plus there's power already available.

 

It'd be a longer-term project, as for now the external film does a good job, I'm really thinking ahead to the time when the film may need replacing.

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@JSHarris, the IGUs have a 2-core 'tail' with a flat profile connector which sits between the IGU and the frame. The control cable has a matching flat connector and the cable passes through a 3mm hole drilled through the timber profile of the window frame and then on through the stud of the window opening into void. In our case we then routed the cables in the ceiling void as part of the first fix.

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Come on then. We're all dying to know......ball park cost per m2?

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@NSS, many thanks for the detail, I think it may well be possible to retrofit this.  Our frames have a deep timber internal bead, that covers the pins that secure the glazing units against the fixed external rubber seals.  We had one defective glazing unit, and I watched as the chap replaced it, and there looks to be room to run cabling in there.  It would also be pretty easy to drill through the frame for the cable, hiding it with the internal timber trim.  The fiddly bit would be drilling a hole in the timber frame to line up with the hole in the window frame, but I'm sure that would be possible with a bit of patience.

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47 minutes ago, Barney12 said:

Come on then. We're all dying to know......ball park cost per m2?

Full price at the time of ordering was circa ₤1k/m2 for the rectangular IGUs and double that for the shaped ones, plus about ₤2k for the control panel, switching, etc, and another ₤2.3k for shipping and commissioning,  but I hasten to add I paid nothing like those numbers and you have also to deduct the cost of the glass that would have been supplied by Internorm. 

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Seriously impressed but...

 

images.jpg.afce769fef0011b3998b03ab5710b015.jpg

 

How much??? :o

 

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Yep, and that was before Brexit hammered the exchange rate.

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1 hour ago, NSS said:

Full price at the time of ordering was circa ₤1k/m2 for the rectangular IGUs and double that for the shaped ones, plus about ₤2k for the control panel, switching, etc, and another ₤2.3k for shipping and commissioning,  but I hasten to add I paid nothing like those numbers and you have also to deduct the cost of the glass that would have been supplied by Internorm. 

 

Thanks. That's definitely not making it into the "must or want to have" list then :/ 

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@Barney12 for us it was a solution to a problem (or at least a potential one) as design calculations showed that overheating may be an issue. We cannot open windows to purge excess heat as the whole reason for building it is to create a clean air environment for my wife (who has a degenerative lung disease). We have a Paul MVHR but with HEPA filtering to achieve this, so opening windows would defeat the object (and full air conditioning would have been almost as expensive to install and much more costly to run).

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Did a little experiment earlier this week. We had two consecutive days where there was bright sunshine all morning. On the first day I left the Sageglass in auto and by 10.30am it was tinting to reduce the solar gain and the indoor temperature remained at 21 degrees all day.

 

On the second day the Sageglass again started to tint at around 10.30am but rather than leaving it in auto I manually overrode and left it in its clear state. Within 90 minutes the indoor temperature had risen by 2 degrees and rose a further degree by mid afternoon. 

 

Okay, early days yet but it seems to be doing what it was designed to do.

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How does Sageglass sense the light levels, or more specifically, where does it, inside or outside.

And does it only sense light levels, or can it also sense temperature inside the building?

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@NSS

 

How much electricity does the auto control of the glass tinting use?  Is it something that is easily quantifiable, or like an LED, a few Watts?

 

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Looks very nice. Not cheap - but if it effectively controls the solar gain that is a major issue to solve.

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5 hours ago, SteamyTea said:

How does Sageglass sense the light levels, or more specifically, where does it, inside or outside.

And does it only sense light levels, or can it also sense temperature inside the building?

External sensor senses light intensity to trigger tinting. No temperature sensing but control can be adjusted to react at varied light intensity so has in effect been calibrated to our location, aspect and glass area.

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4 hours ago, Stones said:

@NSS

 

How much electricity does the auto control of the glass tinting use?  Is it something that is easily quantifiable, or like an LED, a few Watts?

 

Very little. Each window, depending on size, consumes approx 1.2 to 2.0 watts when in full tint.

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9 minutes ago, NSS said:

Very little. Each window, depending on size, consumes approx 1.2 to 2.0 watts when in full tint.

With the added benefit that when they're tinting, the sun is hitting the pv array ?

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8 minutes ago, Nickfromwales said:

With the added benefit that when they're tinting, the sun is hitting the pv array ?

Precisely ;)

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Be interesting to set one up that senses interior temperature as well.  If it is a simple control system it could work well for roof lights.

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