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cutting through 600 masonry


saveasteading
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How best do we cut openings for windows in a 600mm, 3 layer, granite wall?

 

I would like to do this without taking it back 45 degrees from the bottom of the new openings.

 

I may have some very clever ideas....but you may have done it before and know, whereas I am speculating.

 

This is the worst condition section of wall.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, saveasteading said:

Does not need to be perfect, and it can be reformed in blockwork as will be timber clad after. At least that is our assumption that it will benefit from covering.

I have seen a picture of very tidy cutting but assumed it would cost a fortune.

Diamond sawing leaves a very nice edge but obviously can’t do the corners.

hire a diamond core rig, or get someone in and it will fly through 600mm. 
As you are going to trim anyway then say 50mm diameter holes around the edge and then push the block out

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How many chains? say this was a full height cut (roof supported of course). cahins appear to be from £220 each

The wall is traditional 3 layer. granite (and some sandstone) outside, granite inside and a good stone rubble centre, which I would expect might fall away a bit.

Edited by saveasteading
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1 minute ago, saveasteading said:

How many chains? say this was a full height cut (roof supported of course). cahins appear to be from £220 each

The wall is traditional 3 layer. granite (and some sandstone) outside, granite inside and a good stone rubble centre, which I would expect might fall away a bit.

Not a chain, core drill bits. Chain drilling is drilling a series of holes just touching each other to effectively cut a slot

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1 minute ago, markc said:

straight through concrete, rebar, steel beams etc.

I have had specialists do it in reinforced concrete (downwards, with a normalish drill)  and it was surprisingly good value. The kit was the star, and the labour wasn't specialist.

But I am thinking that the drill requires support for horizontal  work and could be special kit.

 

 

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Just now, saveasteading said:

I have had specialists do it in reinforced concrete (downwards, with a normalish drill)  and it was surprisingly good value. The kit was the star, and the labour wasn't specialist.

But I am thinking that the drill requires support for horizontal  work and could be special kit.

 

 

For horizontal or overhead it can be vacuum attached or an anchor put into the part you will be getting rid of anyway. You could do hand held but 600mm a lot of times would be murder

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It looks to be made of boulders, not cut stone.

 

When I worked on a similar looking building, they propped the roof, then dismantled stone by stone the opening they needed, just a bit larger, and built back the edges using cut stone to form the corners.  There was never any attempt to just cut a square hole in it.

 

It will obviously need a new lintel above and rebuild the stone above that to the roof line.

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2 minutes ago, ProDave said:

made of boulders

Yes this section appears to be older than the rest, and is of coarser stone and includes some rough patching.

Our design is to form 3 openings for doors or double doors in this wall

My concern is having seen, on a blog, someone forming openings by removing stones to about 45 degrees, that too much has to come out and might as well be rebuilt.

 

However, elsewhere we have a bit of wall that has fallen out through rain damage and/or tractor impact, and it stays remarkably intact (even oversailing counter to gravity).

 

Hence my hope that a cleanish cut can be made, and you all seem to be saying probably it can.

 

9 minutes ago, ProDave said:

new lintel above and rebuild the stone above

If only. The eaves is only about 2.2m above the floor (Approx where the render starts.)

 

I am for gently taking out the floor and lowering it. (thinnish concrete incorporating original cobbles, all on sand)

The rest of the family wants to knock this section down and rebuild in new. So do the builders we are talking to (easier for them and our money).

I cannot be on site to PM , so have to be realistic that the family on site will let the builders will have their way.

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My stonemason knocked through to create a door for me, used a kango and started in the middle.

once you get one stone out the rest is easy. Wall was the original gable random rubble wall approx 700mm thick

 

 

2 masons and 1 labourer 1 day and 1 full 8 yard skip

plus multiple concrete lintels added in too.

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If it was me I would clean up the area around the door with a pressure washer and then carefully point all the bits not coming out. I would then prop up the roof from the inside and then proceed to remove the stones in the door area starting at the top, when I got to a stone that was protruding I would either pop it out if possible or just use a diamond tipped stone saw to cut it out / cut it  back and then continue downwards.. there is a lot of labour involved but if your wanting to preserve the stonework then it’s the least intrusive way, will  cost more to knock the whole wall down, it’s very easy to start knocking stuff down as it is all so easy and quick and feels great but I have found that sometimes you need to ask - what is the minimum I can do to get the result I want - when it comes to these sort of renovations. I have a petrol stone saw and a petrol diamond core drill as I am working on similar build and they have paid for themselves and will continue to be of great use as my build continues. (I am a stone mason so I already know how to use them?) photos just internet grab. 

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