romario

Solid wall block choice, Ytong, Celcon, Thermalite?

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IIRC, some ICF companies can supply curved forms, so that might be an easier way to get a well-insulated and relatively easy to build round house.  There was a Grand Designs episode years ago, with an ICF build that had a round, spiral, tower in one corner, to a pretty tight radius.

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On 08/07/2019 at 13:12, patp said:

Did you decide on Ytong blocks @romario. Jewsons are offering them to us at £11 per sq m as all others are out of stock.

 

 

On 08/07/2019 at 15:17, PeterW said:

 

Is that ex VAT or inc VAT..? I’m being quoted £9.20 by TP and £9.25 from MKM ex VAT currently. 

 

I cant find prices anywhere near these?

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On 11/07/2019 at 07:16, Russell griffiths said:

How are you going to get blocks to sit nicely in that radius. 

Would you not be better with a shorter block, brick so it follows the radius better, it will be awfully notchy otherwise and a major pain to fit your external insulation. 

  

Are you dead dead set on this method. 

 

On 11/07/2019 at 10:04, Declan52 said:

You have to cut each block in half to get a curve anywhere near decent. Which is very time consuming. Building a radius with blocks can't be done with a line so having to cut each block plus build free hand you will be paying a massive premium to build in that shape. 

Then as @Russell griffiths also says how are you going to bend enough insulation around that shape so you get it to passiv standards.

 

No so, you will easily get standard concrete blocks to go round with no problem and no need to cut the blocks. Given your diameter of 20m, the building circumference is 62.83m, so 279 blocks per course.  The difference between the inside and outside of each perp join will be about 2mm and the maximum deviation in render thickness will be about 1mm.

 

image.png.039112014cccadc89a4c4e064be00543.png

 

image.thumb.png.b4d15d2e5629e24c1bcf264be1c1d7f3.png

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On 11/07/2019 at 10:10, JSHarris said:

IIRC, some ICF companies can supply curved forms, so that might be an easier way to get a well-insulated and relatively easy to build round house.  There was a Grand Designs episode years ago, with an ICF build that had a round, spiral, tower in one corner, to a pretty tight radius.

Isodom2000  system has curved sections avaialble

 

https://econekt.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/ECONEKT.-ICF-Elements-Brochure2.pdf

made to whatever thickness and curvature you want

 

Edited by scottishjohn

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3 hours ago, Mr Punter said:

 

 

No so, you will easily get standard concrete blocks to go round with no problem and no need to cut the blocks. Given your diameter of 20m, the building circumference is 62.83m, so 279 blocks per course.  The difference between the inside and outside of each perp join will be about 2mm and the maximum deviation in render thickness will be about 1mm.

 

image.png.039112014cccadc89a4c4e064be00543.png

 

image.thumb.png.b4d15d2e5629e24c1bcf264be1c1d7f3.png

That's a tidy bit of working out alright. It's still going to be free hand though which will take a fair bit of time to set out for a start then doing the actual building of the blocks.

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Just a slightly wacky thought, but I wonder if it would be possible to set up a dead vertical scaffold pole in the centre, firmly set down into the ground so it can't move, and then have a 10m long arm that pivots from that to provide a reference to help keep the blocks following the curve?

 

Some sort of adjustable stand might be needed to hold the arm at the right level for each course, but I doubt it'd take more time to set something like this up than it would to set up a line several times on a conventional build.

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8 hours ago, JSHarris said:

Just a slightly wacky thought, but I wonder if it would be possible to set up a dead vertical scaffold pole in the centre, firmly set down into the ground so it can't move, and then have a 10m long arm that pivots from that to provide a reference to help keep the blocks following the curve?

 

Some sort of adjustable stand might be needed to hold the arm at the right level for each course, but I doubt it'd take more time to set something like this up than it would to set up a line several times on a conventional build.

Hard core game of swing ball you’re proposing there, @JSHarris :))

Not that wacky Id say-I’ve never built a twisted pier but I believe a micro version of what you suggest is one method of building them. 

Another method might be to keep your centre point as a reference check,set up vertical profiles at say,4 metre intervals & make a curved profile to the shape of the circumference. It’s probably too impractical & time consuming to check every course but you could check maybe every 4th & correct any minor deviations so they don’t increase. 

Btw,my experience of building curved brickwork (albeit garden walls,so more forgiving of minor inaccuracies) was that production can be surprisingly high. Yes,it’s all level work but that’s offset to an extent that you’re just working the length of your level for the height of the lift before moving along and repeating the process.

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17 hours ago, Declan52 said:

That's a tidy bit of working out alright. It's still going to be free hand though which will take a fair bit of time to set out for a start then doing the actual building of the blocks.

When I did a bit of radius work, we used a timber former, if the former was cut from ply you would have a plumbing point every 2.4m you kept these plumb and used the former to tap the bricks from behind until they touched the former. 

 

I still think the brickies on this will be adding a fair margin of pain in the arse markup. 

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