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Temporary toilet plumbing.


Russdl
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Our site has main drainage and I was considering building a small shed to house a toilet and sink, instead of the ubiquitous blue turd-is. Any hints, tips and wise words on how I plumb in a toilet to the existing drainage on a temporary basis? The proposed shed will be about 5m from the nearest inspection chamber on the plot and about 600mm above the invert level. 

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Run a soil pipe from the toilet on the surface of the ground with a reasonable fall on it towards the manhole, cut a piece of plywood to fit in the manhole lid, cut out a 110mm hole in the ply for the pipe to plop in to. 

Couple of blobs of concrete to hold the pipe in place

have a join near the man hole so you can wriggle out the pipe and ply to remove any blockages 

you can chuck a bit of sticky clay around the edges of the ply to keep any smells down. 

 

 

Ours has running water, hand cleaner, soft paper and a mirror 

spent an hour this morning lagging the pipes as we had a harsh frost last night. 

 

Give it it a couple of extra flushes as you walk past just to keep it all flowing. 

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13 hours ago, Russdl said:

Any hints, tips and wise words on how I plumb in a toilet to the existing drainage on a temporary basis?

 

 

My self build neighbour let me crawl under his static caravan to make notes on his pro installed grey & foul drainage. Even for this 1 year temporary setup the foul drain starts with an air admittance valve and the two toilets join this main pipe via branch couplings.

 

Their foul drain does not lack natural gradient so I guess the air admittance valve is there to speed along the flow of a toilet flush.

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10 minutes ago, epsilonGreedy said:

 

My self build neighbour let me crawl under his static caravan to make notes on his pro installed grey & foul drainage. Even for this 1 year temporary setup the foul drain starts with an air admittance valve and the two toilets join this main pipe via branch couplings.

 

Their foul drain does not lack natural gradient so I guess the air admittance valve is there to speed along the flow of a toilet flush.

 

The AAV is there to prevent a vacuum build up as a slug of waste and water goes down the foul drain.  There's a risk that without it the partial vacuum in the pipe might cause the pan to back up as it refills after the flush.

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33 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

The AAV is there to prevent a vacuum build up as a slug of waste and water goes down the foul drain.  There's a risk that without it the partial vacuum in the pipe might cause the pan to back up as it refills after the flush.

 

 

That sounded counter intuitive on first read but after a few minutes thinking and visualizing I get it. So the issue is the velocity of the slug but not to prevent main pipe blockages but instead the design challenge is to clear the pan fast enough before the flow rate of the fresh flushing water reaches maximum?

 

Your post might trigger a redesign of my under static foul drainage because if I follow my neighbour's design there would be a 3m horizontal run from pan to the main foul pipe where the AAV can provide a benefit albeit after a post flush delay. 

Edited by epsilonGreedy
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TBH, 9 times out of 10 it would probably work OK without an AAV, but adding one is relatively cheap and easy and provides reassurance that the pans will always flush and fill properly.  With more than one toilet, basin or sink plumbed to the foul drain there is also the risk that a partial vacuum may empty other traps, as it sucks air through them.

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21 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

TBH, 9 times out of 10 it would probably work OK without an AAV, but adding one is relatively cheap and easy and provides reassurance that the pans will always flush and fill properly.

 

 

Thanks for the clarification. Multiple AAV's for each toilet are a bit of a problem for a static caravan if I am correct in assuming they must be above pan level.

 

I will run the main soil pipe along the centreline of the van which will reduce the toilet horizontal runs to less than 2m. Then at the starting point of the main pipe I will route the pipe outwards and upwards to say 600mm above floor level and cap this off with an AAV.

 

21 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

 With more than one toilet, basin or sink plumbed to the foul drain there is also the risk that a partial vacuum may empty other traps, as it sucks air through them.

 

 

The pro team who installed my neighbour's static drainage considered this a real problem to solve, their grey water drains along a parallel pipe mounted above the foul drain. The grey water then falls into a gulley with water trap before merging with foul pipe.

 

When buying some second hand steps from a holiday park owner in Skegness he was generous enough to give me a lesson on static drainage planning for the whole park. He thought the grey/foul merge under a van via a gulley was overdesign but then he did add that that positive pressure concerns were addressed by two vented soil stacks at downstream locations across the park. 

Edited by epsilonGreedy
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1 minute ago, Russdl said:

@JSHarris do you think the AAV will be a requirement for my situation, 1 toilet and 1 sink discharging to the IC,  along the lines that @Russell griffiths suggested earlier in this thread?

 

Depends how well sealed it it, but you might get away without a vent.  Only way to tell for sure is to test it and see.

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  • 3 months later...
On 04/12/2018 at 22:06, Russell griffiths said:

Run a soil pipe from the toilet on the surface of the ground with a reasonable fall on it towards the manhole, cut a piece of plywood to fit in the manhole lid, cut out a 110mm hole in the ply for the pipe to plop in to.

 

That was a great idea Russ, it's working a treat.

 

I've used loads of the old bungalow roof timber for the frame, and a bit more to cover the soil pipe so it didn't look too much like a gas chamber (though I'm sure it will feel like one at times...). The plywood manhole cover is in two pieces so that I can lift half without disturbing the soil pipe and check that, er, all is in order. The flower thing had decided to grow in our bomb site of a plot so I dug that up to use it as an air freshner.

 

Oh and a bit of old vinyl flooring to make the slopping out a bit easier.

 

No AAV as yet, doesn't seem to need it but it hasn't really been properly stressed tested yet.

 

I have...

 

 

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655560457_Screenshot2019-04-05at19_24_47.png.548001762aad285a76d976c91c37843a.png

1400506811_Screenshot2019-04-05at19_25_02.png.b72b0c6ccd6418b98e5a4162df209419.png

 

Edited by Russdl
speeling agaian
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1 hour ago, Russell griffiths said:

whack a shelf up with a squirty soap on it, and a tub of hand cleaner

 

Thats already installed, the squirty soap that is, and has remained unused by the gallant groundworkers for the last week (as has the bog brush).

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