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Cracking on Garage Foundations


smart70
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Hello everyone

 

I was wondering if anyone can give some advice on cracking on the garage base please ?

As you can see from the pics the garage base is on a slope so the damage might be caused by subsidence.

The concrete base itself has no cracking and is flat which is good news, however (in pic 9) there is a crack from the top to the bottom, and (in pic 7) the brickwork is coming away.  Also in in pic 11. it looks like the footer is exposed. 

It would appear the wall is a retaining wall as it does not support the concrete base. 

 

What I plan, is to repair the crack in the wall using mortar filler, and reattach the concrete blocks that are coming away. Is this a good idea ?

Not sure about the base, does it require underpinning or not ?

 

Just recently moved into the property. The old prefab garage with asbestos roofing was demolished last year. What I would like, is to build a wooden garage in its place.

 

If anyone can give me some advice on this I would be most grateful

 

Thank you

 

 

Garage 1.jpg

Garage 2.jpg

Garage 3.jpg

Garage 4.jpg

Garage 5.jpg

Garage 6.jpg

Garage 7.jpg

Garage 8.jpg

Garage 9.jpg

Garage 10.jpg

Garage 11.jpg

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My take is that "surrounding" wall has been filled presumably with some hardcore or other infill, and that is creating outward pressure on that wall which is now spreading and pushing apart.

 

that "surrounding" wall should have been built as a retaining wall for that application.

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If that’s a single skin wall all the way round then I’d say it’s not substantial enough to retain the load within. You could possibly add some buttressing but I’d get some pro advice from an SE before building anything else on top of it. 
None of my business byt are you sure you want your garage that far back in your garden? 
Why not adjacent to the house?

Edited by Brickie
Pedantry
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2 hours ago, Brickie said:

If that’s a single skin wall all the way round then I’d say it’s not substantial enough to retain the load within. You could possibly add some buttressing but I’d get some pro advice from an SE before building anything else on top of it. 
None of my business byt are you sure you want your garage that far back in your garden? 
Why not adjacent to the house?

A buttress or two would be a good idea, I will ask the structural engineer when he comes round. The reason I would like the garage at the rear of the house, is because there would be a garage within a garage due to the tall driveway gates by the house. This I think is better security wise when storing equipment, tools etc.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi everyone. Just giving you an update on the repairs to the garage foundations. It would appear that concrete pillars have been constructed at the corners to support the foundation and as mentioned by members hardcore has been placed inside. 

I decided to remove all the concrete blocks along the top which had become weathered and also the concrete block that had cracked.

On removal of the blocks no hardcore came out, which was a good sign. I decided it would be a good idea to strengthen the hardcore by adding some concrete (see 2nd pic).

As you can see the completed job looks a lot neater and tidy. The next stage will be rendering the concrete blocks with plaster and then painting it white.   

Garage 14.jpg

Garage 15.JPG

Garage 16.jpg

Garage 17.jpg

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When I built a garage on a similar slope years ago my SE insisted on block on flat plus vertical block, total 400mm thick retaining wall, slightly OTT in my opinion. If it were me I would get some flat steel say 2m x 50mm by 8mm, bend in the middle and strap the top row of blocks round the corner with concrete screws, this will spread the load and stop the blocks being pushed off.

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