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Fascia options?


Crofter
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I had been hoping to obtain some planed larch for my fascia boards, but unfortunately this is proving tricky (BM will not get me the small quantity that I need). The rest of the house is to be clad in rough sawn larch, which I think will look a little too rustic for the fascias.

The windows are alu-clad and the roof is to be steel.

 

What are my options? PVCu is probably out of the question as it will look wrong, IMHO. I understand that aluminium is an option, but I have not obtained prices for this yet, and I have the feeling that it is designed to overclad a timber board. I did look for steel, as I thought it would work well if I could get it to match the finish on the roof sheets, but have not found any yet.

 

What about dressed pine? I guess it would need a very good treatment system to give it any sort of useful lifespan.

WBP ply? I have a vision of it going all wobbly between each rafter, but maybe it would be OK?

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That would be my first suggestion too.

 

However, if you are considering an alu fascia, try MSP Scotland

 

http://www.mspcladding.co.uk/

 

They were quite happy to fabricate my window cills and powder coat them to match my windows. Small order, £247 for 265mm wide, 2mm thick folded cills, 18 linear metres worth.  I dealt with Derek in sales and very helpful he was.

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I am planning on aluminium fascias over wood, if I can, painted the same colour as the windows. when the time comes I will look at the company Stones has used.

 

Also note that Marley do an aluminium fascia cladding system that you should be able to get from a builders merchant. I am going to lok at that as well as it may be cheaper than getting a custom made solution, but it only comes in a set number of standard colours. 
 

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42 minutes ago, Construction Channel said:

you could just buy a planner..........?

 

I did ask my mate for a loan of his planer thickenesser, but when I told him how much I needed to do he went all sucky-teethy-shaky-heady and muttered a lot. So I got the impression that it wasn't feasible. Then again, I've never used one. There's about 35m to do.

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In the BM I use, you can get any wood pressure treated for a nominal sum.  Perhaps a timber/builders merchant near you does the same?

 

A couple of years ago I had to go to one of those open gardens days in the next door village and in one newish house I was idly examing the garage/workshop whilst waiting to leave & could not work out what the soffits were made of.  Had to ask the owner.  They were wood-effect plastic, but it was very hard to tell.

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Revisiting this as I need to make a decision soon.

I was mulling over the idea of just doing the fascias in rough sawn larch, the same stuff that I am cladding the building in, and will likely also use for the barge boards (well, the little bit of board that will visible beyond the steel L-profile that finishes off the roof ends). The rough sawn larch will also be used around the windows as reveals and header.

 

I'm treating everything with a two stage system comprising clear preserver and oil top coat.

 

I'd have to join two of my cladding boards together to get the required width- I have a rather underused router that I could maybe use, or maybe I should just buy a biscuit joiner thingy? Or of course just tack a joining plate onto the hidden side of the fascia but that's not so neat really.

 

Or maybe it will look a little bit too rough n ready and I should use something else?

 

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Crofter

we did exactly that with the last build and used two rough cut boards joined together with a strip on the rear (glued and screwed) although it looks ok it did move and pull apart over the first summer due to shrinking and twisting

The resulting gap is visible but to be honest is not noticed.

 

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Thanks, I'm inclined to go this route as even though it might look a bit rough, I would expect the larch to last longer than e.g. dressed pine or cheapish ply. To do it in marine ply would be a couple of hundred quid which I have not budgetted for.

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