Jump to content
  • entries
    53
  • comments
    404
  • views
    6837

House shaped object in a field


vivienz

1185 views

 Share

....is how my brother in law accurately described the state of the build now when I Whatsapped him the picture below, taken yesterday afternoon.

1538688821_houseshapedobjectinafield.thumb.jpeg.cda9514e2d746c0bb522f2607593270e.jpeg

 

As you can see, MBC have been at their blitzkrieg style building speed again and this morning I arrived to find my roof all covered in membrane and battens, too, and MBC noticeable by their absence.  Actually, it's the silence that you notice as much as anything.  There were about 7 in the team over the weekend and when all the nailguns are going it does sound either like gunfire skirmishes or lots of firecrackers going off.  Either way, they were true to form and really shifted.

 

This is the view from down the lane and you can see the membrane and battens all in place.  Personally, I think that this is an interesting photo because it shows how, despite being a large building, the view of it from the lane is much less prominent than one might expect, due to the angles of the gables and pitched roof.  The part that looks like it's covered in tin foil is the garage.

 

133433441_viewfromthelane.thumb.jpeg.ee5dbc440bf6bc2e826465c53fb57b3c.jpeg

 

Here's a more distant view from down the lane, taken before the membrane went on.

 

1597322439_distantviewfromthelane.thumb.jpg.3244e12706f477f73172ae0500aaff7e.jpg

 

Of course, in order to get the roof on, all the posi-joists needed to be put in place and this was being done over the weekend.  My neighbours work in construction and have been fascinated by the process of the MBC build, which is all very new to them.  It's great having neighbours who view the construction with such enthusiasm because instead of complaining about noise and disturbance about the teams and working late/working weekends, etc. (remember Peter powerfloating the slab till 12.45 am?), they gush about how hard working they are and give me full update reports on what's happened in my absence.  Lucky me!  And thus, according to my local spy network, there were 9 team members working on Saturday and there were 7 on Sunday.  No wonder I came back to an empty site today.

 

I was away from the site on Friday, dropping hubby off at Luton airport at 6.30am and then on to have a brief bit of R&R with a girlfriend in Birmingham before heading back south.  On Friday, my temporary staircase was delivered from Howdens and MBC added a couple of extra treads to the bottom to bring it up to the necessary height.  For £120 + delivery (and VAT, if applicable), it's a very useful bit of timber to have.

 

1687494288_howdensstaircase.thumb.jpg.0908edf83b62c053442b1a596639de03.jpg

 

Most of the stud walls are up now; there are only 2 that need to be put up when MBC come back, both off the hallway and have been left out for the time being for logistics.  This photo is looking from our bedroom into the en suite and through to the main guest bedroom.

 

2080926194_interiorstudwalls.thumb.jpg.9e39a0f7a3e7a961d41ddeafe628a534.jpg

 

We had a lucky save on the stud walls, not in financial terms but layouts.  The architect had specified that each of the bedrooms should have a partial stud wall just inside the door and centrally located, almost making a corridor as you walk into the room.  We were really unconvinced by the idea at the time, but went along with it as it can be hard to accurately imagine these things before the building goes up.  When I came to the site on Thursday, however, it was clear that they would have been awful for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, having gone to a lot of effort and expense to have bigger rooms, these immediately sliced off 25% to 30% of the room and made you feel like you were being pushed up against the window which, by the time a large bed is in the room, is exactly what would happen.  The second reason is that because of the really high vault in the main bedrooms, 4.7m, having a run of about 3 along the floor from the partial stud wall the the window meant the proportions were really off and looked terrible.  Still, nothing ventured, nothing gained, and these weren't put in and are now a nice load of scrap or surplus timber lying around.

 

The matter of the stud walls does, however, emphasise the value of being on site most days as had I been absent, they would have been put up according to the plan and I'd have regretted it bitterly.  There have been many instances like this where what seems like a small, or even trivial, decision or alteration at the time which is quick and easy to deal with because I'm there, could have developed into a big deal or expensive issue at a later time.

 

Coming back to those vaulted ceilings, the ridge height is such that when the scaffolders came back to put the second lift on and make some adjustments earlier in the week, we needed to get a tower in for the guys to reach the top internally.  If I can give one bit of advice to anyone starting out, scaffolding is EXPENSIVE!! I know that very little comes cheap when paying others to build a house, but don't underestimate the cost of scaffolding.  By the time I'm done, mine will be just over £5k.  It isn't the simplest of buildings to scaffold with the balconies and vaults, but even so, it's a significant cost.

 

1465420773_scaffoldingtower.thumb.jpg.c60856d8334c65d66b239e27c4a29655.jpg

 

Once all the internal stuff was getting done, the roof was getting boarded.  This is the main, west facing bedroom with half of its roof boarded.

 

1259127664_boardingtheroof.thumb.jpg.7aaea15e7c9f92d1c44b1318a72d782c.jpg

 

And then the same once it was all covered.

 

1628697776_anotherwestbedroomview.thumb.jpg.c51252391196d61afd3e7515c42cf2a9.jpg

 

Finally for this post, the balconies have been made ready for boarding and flat roofing.  I have to go back to the architect in the morning to check on the fall of these and the direction of the run-off as it doesn't make sense to me right now.  I need to refresh my memory as to what was discussed and answer a couple of queries PDQ as my flat roofing is now imminent.  But that's another subject for another post.

 

2074658825_terracewithfirringpieces.thumb.jpg.8bb27d120626945837dc636e0639cb60.jpg

unboarded roof.jpg

West bedroom view.jpg

  • Like 6
 Share

7 Comments


Recommended Comments

Looks great. On your balconies, have you given thought as to how the balustrade (assuming glass) will be mechanically supported?

 

If they're being attached to the outer edge of the wall, ensure you've got sufficient support for the fixings (and photo everything).

 

If they're being supported by the roof edge, make sure you know how this will work with your waterproofing system.

 

I did neither of the above and ended up with a cool, but more expensive, alu framed decking system that sits on the GRP (tied back into wall) and supports the glass. 

 

Also, don;t be too shy with your flat roof falls, we have a puddle on one of our roofs as the fall was too gentle and whatever happened with the GRP means there's a few mm too much at the edge and all the water won't drain. Evaporates eventually but doesn't look great.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Itts amazing how fast it’s gone up.

 

Regarding the scaffolding costs, I’m just about the start getting prices for scaffolding around our foundations, prior to the frame going up, It’s something I’m not looking forward to!

Link to comment
31 minutes ago, Bitpipe said:

Looks great. On your balconies, have you given thought as to how the balustrade (assuming glass) will be mechanically supported?

 

If they're being attached to the outer edge of the wall, ensure you've got sufficient support for the fixings (and photo everything).

 

If they're being supported by the roof edge, make sure you know how this will work with your waterproofing system.

 

I did neither of the above and ended up with a cool, but more expensive, alu framed decking system that sits on the GRP (tied back into wall) and supports the glass. 

 

Also, don;t be too shy with your flat roof falls, we have a puddle on one of our roofs as the fall was too gentle and whatever happened with the GRP means there's a few mm too much at the edge and all the water won't drain. Evaporates eventually but doesn't look great.

 

I haven't had a chance to go into the balustrades yet, I'm still playing catch-up with MBC!  The balconies should be able to fix onto the parapets, though I need to get more information on that.  I keep hoping for a bit of downtime for research, but it's scarce right now.

 

The roof falls are pretty much pre-determined and already done, but we will tweak where we can - comments on puddles helpful and noted.

Link to comment
22 hours ago, vivienz said:

 

I haven't had a chance to go into the balustrades yet, I'm still playing catch-up with MBC!  The balconies should be able to fix onto the parapets, though I need to get more information on that.  I keep hoping for a bit of downtime for research, but it's scarce right now.

 

The roof falls are pretty much pre-determined and already done, but we will tweak where we can - comments on puddles helpful and noted.

 

Does your waterproofing system lap over the parapets? In which case f you're doing a U channel that the glass will slot into you'll have to penetrate the top of the parapet plus need a very solid substrate to bolt the channel on to.

 

Looking at the buildup above, your parapet looks to be CLS either edge and I presume will have OSB on top - meaning your glass channel will need to either be on outside or inside edge and one course of CLS may not be enough to hold the channel and glass securely (imagine someone leaning on the top edge if the glass, making the balcony want to pivot at the bottom. 

 

 

Easy to beef this up now but not when you have a finished wall / roof :)

 

Picture1.thumb.png.25d6c3d2d74731b2aef33f2ccf497feb.png

Picture2.png

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment

Thanks for the heads-up, @Bitpipe.  Fortunately/unfortunately, depending which way you look at it, my flat roofs are being worked on now.  The flat roof company I'm using managed to squeeze me in PDQ as I was really concerned about leaving the decks exposed to the weather with autumn approaching.  It may well mean that I will need to do some sort of retro-fit on the balustrade, but I think I would rather suffer that than get my decks soaked.  I'll have a chat with the guys when I'm on site tomorrow and see what they have to say.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...