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Cooker - Gas Cylinder Location


soapstar
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Hi Folks,

 

Nearing the stage of starting and another question has popped into my head!

 

So we will have a duel fuel rangemaster cooker in our kitchen (electric, gas hob), to which the gas will come from gas cylinders (47kg Propane). Now our cooker is located at the front of the house and the last thing we want is the cylinders outside at the front! What would be involved to get the gas pipe to the back of the house, this would be approximately 12m in distance. Would we have to incorporate a duct into the foundation slab to carry this pipe from the kitchen? If so i would hate to forget and be left with horrible cylinders at the front of the house! ?

 

 

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We have that set up. A Brittania dual fuel range with gas hob on a pair of 47kg cylinders, family of four.  Works very well. One cylinder lasts 18 months at least. I was thinking of using smaller cylinders but someone here pointed out that they may not be able to deliver the gas flow rate required when multiple rings in use.

 

Our cylinders are located about 40m (yes forty meters) from the cooker in a cabinet behind the garage. We used several lengths of plastic coated copper pipe designed for the purpose. I think the connections were gas compression fittings, pressure tested and then wrapped in Denso tape before being buried in the ground. Indoors we laid the pipe in the floor insulation (we have beam and block with insulation and UFH in screed in kitchen). We used one length of pipe indoors so no joints under floor screed. We only used a duct pipe through the foundations. 

 

To pressure test you turn off the valve at cooker end. Fit a regulator and cylinder in the cabinet. The regulator has a gauge on it. Open the gas valve on the cylinder to pressurise the pipe run then close it again. Pressure gauge should remain stable for at least 24 hours.

 

Metal cabinets for gas cylinders are expensive for what they are. Ours is designed for 47kg cylinders but it's only just tall enough and has a fixed roof. It's a pain to wrestle the cylinder into place through the door and connect it up. See if you can find one with a hinged roof as well or at least plenty tall so you can get your arms in there.  I've recently changed to much longer hoses (4ft) between regulator and cylinder so I can connect it up outside the cabinet then shove it into place.

 

47kg cylinders are heavy even on a sack trolley. Avoid steps between car parking and cabinet if possible.  You can get them delivered but that might be more expensive. I've always collected mine but you need something to stop the cylinder rolling around and protection for the lip of the boot when dragging it in and out.  Two man job really.

 

 

 

 

 

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@Temp Thanks very much for your informative reply. Seems like you have a similar situation to what we will have (hopefully!). We will also have UFH in screed in the kitchen. I was worried that a great distance would be detrimental to the pressure from the cylinder to the cooker however if you are all good from 40m then we certainly will have no problem!

 

From what you have said I think i better take note to tell the builder this before they start the foundations! As from what I can gather there wouldn't be any alternative way to direct the gas pipe from one side of the house to the other without being through the foundations.

 

Yes I have quite a bit hands on experience with the 47kg bottles, very annoying to get into those cabinets! Your tip of a longer hose from the regulator is a good idea, i will take note!

 

 

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I too have a dual fuel rangemaster with bottled gas, builder laid a yellow plastic gas pipe around the house to the side where we also have the ASHP. The pipe was converted to copper before entering the house to abide with gas regs, gas chap turned up and signed off the pipework for BC. I did not go for 47kg bottles but 19kg and I can’t remember the last time one was changed? (It’s sure to run out now I’ve said that ?)

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I have run various service things (not gas pipe yet, though - more TV, internet and such) just by putting them into the loose gravel ballast below a path (or eg above a French Drain). Given that the gas pipe will be reinforced, I think that could work.

 

Personally I do not particularly like the idea of having it in a slab.

 

My gas is all plumbed in, however at the old family house we had it outside the kitchen window by the path to the front door, just hidden behind an evergreen bush on a paving slab. This was at the end of a long drive, however.

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7 minutes ago, soapstar said:

@joe90 why didn’t I think of just going ‘around’ the house instead of through the house! Makes sense and at least they will be accessible if there are any issues. 
 

As you say @Ferdinand I too would be a little apprehensive having the gas run through the concrete slab.

 

 

I just consulted the Building Services Handbook, defo very bad form to take a long route through the house foundations, cavities and voids. @joe90's builder did the right thing going around the house outside, then into the internal point of delivery via the shortest path.

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40 minutes ago, epsilonGreedy said:

 

I just consulted the Building Services Handbook, defo very bad form to take a long route through the house foundations, cavities and voids. @joe90's builder did the right thing going around the house outside, then into the internal point of delivery via the shortest path.


Not if it is done using Tracpipe as that is what it designed for. 

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1 hour ago, soapstar said:

why didn’t I think of just going ‘around’ the house instead of through the house!


my builder and I erred on the side of caution by putting it in a location accessible and any gas escape thro damage would not build up under the house.

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