ryder72

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ryder72 last won the day on February 26 2018

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  1. Thats exactly what I was certain you were going to say. Its not really the kitchen suppliers fault that your contractor has behaved unprofessionally (and I assure you its not the first time this has happened). Its no excuse that your kitchen supplier hasnt cooperated, but having had the kitchen suppliers hat on, I can assure you that we come across this a lot. Builders have a habit of acting like children when things dont always go their way and can make it an art form of making a nuisance of themselves. We make it very clear to our clients that our contract is with them and not the contractor, so while we endeavour to work with their contactors, the client will always have to be the go between and remain in the loop in any communications and agreements. In this case, I think you should have a strong word with your contractor and tell them that they need to fall in line.
  2. Why do you say the kitchen supplier and the main contractor 'obviously hate each other'? A dry fit would mean exactly that. The plumber would fit the tap, waste connectors and make water/waste connections. I think your builder is being difficult. It is more normal for a plumber to have tap spanners than a kitchen fitter.
  3. All comes down to what you want to spend for the extractor but a good quality extractor wont be cheap. Most manufacturerers make one to suit a 90cm over hob integrated unit
  4. You are fine to stand on a quartz worktop as long as you are standing on the carcase side so that your weight gets transferred down the carcase gables. Do not stand in the middle of a unit. You will almost certainly crack it. NEVER put any pressure on a hob or sink cutout front or for that matter within a 60cm zone even if its on a gable. This is where the worktop is stressed from the cutting and weakened. Standing on a join is not a problem. Worse ccase the joint gives but thats fixable.
  5. Yes most manufacturers are showing shortages but Bosch/Neff/Siemens are the worst hit. All blaming covid but I suspect there is more to it than that. Appliance manufacturers whose products use fewer Asian products are far less affected than those source from Asia. Brexit will likely make it worse.
  6. Maybe. But the tablet drops into the base which is flooded. Doesnt matter as I have found a cup of white vinegar does the job perfectly and costs pennies vs a fancy bottle of multicoloured liquid for £3.
  7. If you use all in one tabs, strictly speaking there is no need to use salt. However, salt is no inexpensive that it does help neutralise the chalk we get FOC with our water in the southeast more effective so for the sake of a few quid a year there is no point in compromising. If you dont use all in one tabs, then salt is definitely needed to soften hard water. Vinegar goes into a cup on the top shelf at the front of the dishwasher. I am not sure why it should be at the front but it didnt seem worth my while experimenting. Its more important that cleaning the dishwasher with various cleaners to clean out the filters every couple of weeks if its used daily without rinsing plates before loading (we dont). The amount of gunk is eye opening.
  8. Cup of white vinegar in the top tray and the hottest wash available always does it for dishwashers. All these fancy brands will have to believe that have magic potions. All in 1 dishwasher tablets from LIDL / ALDI are great too, but it does no harm to keep the salt container topped up if you are outside of scotland and the far south west.
  9. Unfortunately no. Sapienstone is a porcelian top so it will have the same properties as the other brands.
  10. Is this what you mean? https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.kimptonflooring.co.uk%2Fadvice%2Fadvice.htm&psig=AOvVaw0eeVa1r7BMOCYzCGVMOi7p&ust=1597929845569000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=2ahUKEwjWt-vXrqfrAhVQEGMBHbzBBX0Qr4kDegUIARC0Ag
  11. Its a wet room. Not an option now.
  12. The movement is very minor, but its there. there is definite deflection when stood in between two joists along the midway point in the room. The joists go from an external wall to a steel. I am surprised how much deflection there is on just a 2.4m section.
  13. Replying to various messages - No matting used. I did a quick scan of the Ditra matting and I cant see how it would have helped in this particular situation. Marine ply was used to build up the floor and provide additional rigidity. It was screwed down to the joists through the chipboard using gold screws at 100mm intervals. I will check about the gluing of the ply. But screwing down - yes. Admittedly the ply may not be glued. Is that likely to make it less effective?
  14. The shower tray is not the problem. its the tiling in the rest of the room
  15. You will probably recall that I had a timber frame house built few years ago. We have now lived in the house for 2.5 years and have experienced a problem recently. Our master ensuite is on the first floor, approx 2.8m * 2.45m of which a section of 2.45 * 1m is a walk in shower. The shower tray was a former and for this we had requested the joists under the tray to be shorter allowing for a 40mm recess to set the tray inside. The rest of the bathroom is on regular joists running in the 2.45m direction. I think the joists are set at 600mm centres. The bathroom has been tiled using 10mm thick porcelain tiles. The 22mm chipboard on the joists is covered by 18mm marine ply and the tiles attached used a 12mm bed of adhesive. Noggings have been installed between joists to stabilise them. Over the past 2.5 years the tiles are now popping loose. We have lifted the tiles today and found that the adhesive is completely cracked but firmly attached to the tiles. It has largely separated from the ply. There is a reasonable amount of flex in the floor and the tiler is of the opinion that there is excessive flex and unless this flex is eliminated,the problem could reoccur. Does anyone have any experience of this and are there any ways to eliminate this problem?