ryder72

Members
  • Content Count

    373
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

ryder72 last won the day on February 26 2018

ryder72 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

101 Excellent

About ryder72

  • Rank
    Regular Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I have a Grant Vortex boiler coupled to a 500l thermal store to eliminate the short cycling problem. I have reused this boiler from the previous house which was demolished. The boiler used to turn on and offer up to 4 times an house and used oil faster than a Boeing 747. On a really cold day (ambient -5) with 2 people occupying/showering and the UFH heating a 250m2 house (floor area approx 170 m2) the boiler will not fire approx 3 -4 times in a 24 hour period and run for up to 45 minutes to take the store from 40 degrees to 90 degrees. The boiler is rated at a much higher capacity than it needs to be.
  2. Miele has had a large dishwasher for ages in their range and they recommend installlation only in kitchens with plinths 100mm or lower. Siemens/Neff/Bosch brought theirs out aboout 7 years ago with a sliding hinge mechanism to allow their tall dishwasher to go into 'normal' kitchens. I am not sold on the hinge sliding mechanism. We have had some issues with these clips failling if the drilling is as much as 1 mm out on the door. Please keep an eye on your sliding mechanism. Failure results in the decor door just falling off and getting dented/damaged and needing replacement.
  3. People tend to get too wound up about not having a dishwasher or not having two on the basis that they dont put everything in their dishwasher. Get a half load one and it solves the problem of the dishwasher getting smelly. Ultimately its a dishwasher and its not a living space. Its going to be a bit smelly and unpleasant. Deal with it!!!
  4. You can use a teppanyaki for everything that you use a flat frying pan for- frying burgers/steaks grilling veg/fish/meat Granted its a very expensive appliance with relatively little use depending on cooking style. Often a flexible induction hob with a teppan/griddle plate is a more sensible option.
  5. Its quite popular and a very good idea especially with modern open plan spaces. I have this at home and we tend to use one dishwasher for crockery and the other for pans allowing for the pans to be washed daily and the crockery every 2/3 days as required. While entertaining it is quite normal for us to throw everything in the dishwasher and not have the sight of pots piling up for washing. Where space is available, I recommend this solution.
  6. I think granite is great if you want something in blacks or greys. Polished granite can be a pain but a lot of people overlook textured black granite which looks superb and is low maintenance. If you want 'colours', then quartz is a great alternative. Great price /value blend. Dekton is a good product but expensive. But I feel aspects are missold. Its extremely brittle and chips very easily with chips being very difficult to repair. I dont like the fact that a lot of their colours arent through coloured so edges and cutouts are a different colour to worktops. Drainer grooves also bring out a different colour so arent recommended. Mitred built up edges are impossible to do without very large bevels provided the colour difference is accepted. In summary not my favourite product. Corian - as said before. My least favourite worktop. Wood - great. very environmentally friendly. If you can put up with the maintenance there is no reason to not have it. Laminate - Hugely underrated and falling out of favour for lack of snob value but unbeatable for the price. On balance, Quartz is where the market is right now.
  7. Not a big supporter of corian. Highly overrated product for kitchen worktops. Originally developed for architectural cladding applications its found acceptable in hygenic applications such as bathroom and kitchens. but the product is very soft, easily scratched and burnt (though repairable). If one were to lay criteria to develop a good worktop surface i think scratch and heat resistance in a kitchen would be very high on that list.
  8. Just drop the hob into the cutout in quartz/granite. The neoprene type material deforms under the weight of the hob and seals the cutout. Its not going onlywhere. The springy clips are really only suited for a worktop with a timber based substrate.
  9. Sigma3 are a kitchen manufacturer. They wont install. Bouncing in a drawer is an old trick salesmen used to do. But it still they still do it. Its very easy- A typical set of runners will have about 10 fixing points but only 3 are ever fixed. More are provided for flexibility. 'Watch the look in their eyes' drawers get screwed in through every available fixing into the carcase. Then the sales jumps in it for a few months after which the drawers eventually sag and are swapped for a new pair when no one is watching. Most runners for wide pan drawers are rated at between 65-75 kg by the likes of Blum, Grass, Hettich, all large manufacturers. If they could take the impact loading of a 70kg bouncing salesman without problems they would rate them at 300kg. What you have seen is the equivalent of a 7.5 tonner loaded to 20 tonnes. It wont break but its wont last
  10. You can get some amazing bespoke furniture made but its not going to be cheap. The question I would ask is what exactly is bespoke. What are the carcases made from. They may still be MFC in which case its no different to anything else. They may be veneered MDF in which case the durability is questionable. Are you getting solid timber drawer boxes. Again you can buy solid oak drawer boxes off the shelf with soft close so nothing new there. Are you getting soft close hinges or traditional butt hinges. The latter is more bespoke but dearer. Are you getting bespoke sized cabinets made? You can get this from many medium sized manufacturers without a premium to pay for this. Are they making bespoke style of doors for you and are you using any special timbers for this. This would make is truly bespoke but expensive. In summary, bespoke is a much used and abused word so make sure its really bespoke in the true sense of the word before committing.
  11. I have believed and said this for years - the attention to detail and build quality of German kitchen at any price point is superior to British made ones. The trick is to identify where the chosen make of kitchen sits in the market hierarchy in Germany and ensure that an undue premium isnt paid for it. Many German brands are imported into the UK through an agent or distributor and that adds unnecessary premiums. Some retailers bring in basic or mid market brands and position them higher than their level through clever marketing and sales trick and this can create a real smoke screen. It probably isnt possible to buy a German kitchen at the Howdens price point at all but there is simply no comparison between the products. I am probably gooing to be shot down for saying this, but this is borne out by years in the business and having dealt with multiple British manufacturers over the years, of which all except one have consistently fail to delivery. The one I rate highly is a very premium product and yet I couldnt recommend their contemporary product over an equivalent one.
  12. Ex Display kitchens can be great deals. Dealers need to shift them. They are usually very well specced. They are unused and well looked after. Get in touch with a few kitchen studios in your area several months before you need a kitchen and leave your details behind. I for one would be happy to sell any of my displays to an end consumer directly than pass it though a broker and pay them anywhere from £1000-1500 and have to add that cost to the sale price of the kitchen.
  13. Like all brokers they just create the platform for a kitchen studio to find a buyer. They dont really accept any responsibility for the actual kitchen sale though some handle payments Its down to the buyer to check the product and make sure it meets their requirements.
  14. Always recommend bulk items in deep drawers in larder cupboards at waist/chest height for easy access. Containers for these could be clear glass jars, easily avialable. Spices either in wide drawers or on wall unit shelves but never under worktop in slim pullout units. Too much of a pain getting to them
  15. This probably points back to what brand of quartz it was. If your fabricator was importing this material, I suspect they stopped due to quality problems. Run a mile for the cheap Asian imports. They really can be hit and miss. Dulling points to two things - high resin content or improper use (dragging items across it which is capable of scratching almost all worktop materials dulling the surface) Staining again is possible on granite and quartz and the biggest culprits are oil and acidic substances. Sadly no worktop is perfect but quartz on balance is a great surface unless you like black/grey granites which have a lot going for them.