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Gas main diversion


Mark A
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Has anyone had the issue of having to divert a gas main for the foundations and idea of costs?

 

The contractor is 3/4 through the foundations and discovered a steel pipe. The initial inspection points to it being an old gas pipe that has since had plastic fed through it. We now await follow up inspection, then can apply for a quote to divert. We checked prior to building the location maps it looks like the network drawings are slightly out. It should be under a flagged footpath the same as all the other utilities, we can only think that many years ago it was decided lower cost to put under what was softer ground compared to taking up old flagstones.

 

 

Disappointed that not only has worked stopped for an unknown period we will get hit with the extra costs to divert despite carrying out all relevant checks.

 

Anyone ideas on pricing per metre or how the process works in terms of time would appreciate comments, online I can only find prices for meter diversions. ?

 

I couldn't find any other information on this forum so think its another potential hidden pitfall to be aware of for future self-builders, we were grateful it wasn't damaged.

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Do the gas network have any easement or wayleave?  When you bought the property were you aware of the gas main on your land?

 

Service plans are rarely very accurate.  If it is shown on your land the location can be very approximate and as you say, it is easier to soft dig than to remove / replace flagstones.

 

If you want it done quickly, contact the emergency number and say your groundworker has just hit a pipe and you think you can smell gas.

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Almost same scheme as her. Our diversion was £600 but all we needed was the pipe squeezed, a new connection made and fed to the new gas meter location to which I had dug all the trenches. I then pulled the plastic pipe out of the metal in the severed end and all was well.

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I came across this problem, but when I googled i didn't like the sound of the cost, so I dug a trench where I wanted the gas pipe to run then rang up National Grid/transco and said I was doing some gardening and have come across a pipe, I think it might be now leaking.

 

They sent and engineer out to assess the job, he saw what the game was, but called engineers to fix the leak. 2 hours later and  £20 each and I had a gas pipe where I wanted it!

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On 26/04/2018 at 14:20, Mr Punter said:

Do the gas network have any easement or wayleave?  When you bought the property were you aware of the gas main on your land?

 

Service plans are rarely very accurate.  If it is shown on your land the location can be very approximate and as you say, it is easier to soft dig than to remove / replace flagstones.

 

If you want it done quickly, contact the emergency number and say your groundworker has just hit a pipe and you think you can smell gas.

Yes there is a footpath which is across our land and all the other services are under this footpath so it seemed logical with the support of the plans it would be there. We had the emergency team out they just referred back to the department that move it. Sure we will get there eventually, we knew there would be challenges on the way.

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