dangti6

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About dangti6

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    Taunton, Somerset

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  1. Time for a nice cold cider. Got a bit more to remove in both the trench and put to get down to final depth - perhaps I should have got a digger in!
  2. Good shout. Found out they are actually called Aquacrate - which are manufactured by Pennine. Gave them a call and they clarified that the cones are for strength and the sides can be drilled for an inlet as and where required.
  3. I am creating a 0.8 cubic metre soakaway using two aquavoid 100mmx1000mmx400mm crates. I can avoid digging an extra 200mm down if I orientate them like this: There are no access points at the sides so I’d have to bore through, but is the above any different from an efficiency point of view? I think my back would prefer to dig wider opposed to deeper The crates have fluted sections throughout which would be vertical in that application for what’s its worth.
  4. I have since removed the existing wall. I am using A142 6mm steel mesh within the new slab. Would you drill and resin fix some rebar sticks in to the side of the existing slab to tie it in or leave it independent? It’s only about 90mm thick at the thickest point. I have noticed that along the edge there are further areas where there are voids - at the far end the hardcore beneath appears to have sunk down about 50/75mm. It’s dropped here about a foot inward. Clay soil settlement perhaps. The mortar frogs will be knocked off. I’m tempted to lay the DPM flat under/against the existing slab rather than running up the side of it to avoid creases and get a flusher joint. Or will the weight of the concrete when tamped force and creases together enough to not be a concern?
  5. Don’t want to dig anymore than I have to! 😆 Perhaps adjustable bends are the way forward!
  6. Grateful if I could rack some brains. I am going to dig a soakaway fed by 2 rainwater down pipes. I’m looking to branch off using a 45degree fitting as shown below. Each down pipe will enter bottle gullies. Is a 15 degree bend a common angle to connect to each gully to give me the fall? My entry points are fixed. Is there another way to achieve what I need that I have overlooked, perhaps running 2 straight pipes in to the soakaway to avoid the branch? Also I ordered some geotextile fabric and explained it was for wrapping soakaway crates and they sent me some Groundtex - essentially weed membrane like this. Not sure I’m comfortable using that so may buy another roll of proper non woven stuff unless I am worrying too much and should just use it.
  7. How old are you and how long have you been in the rental? (just trying to determine if it could be age related changes and not the toilet)
  8. I have a length of soffit board which runs under a steel beam (garage door opening). It is held on an external frame behind the fascia, but before the door frame goes on rendering access difficult, I’d like to add some adhesive between the steel and soffit for insurance. I have some pink grip adhesive to hand which states not for use with plastic laminated foam board. I checked the tube as I feared there could be a case of show through, melting etc. Solvent free adhesives require one material be porous. Superglue is my strongest contender at the moment. Could anyone recommend an adhesive for this application?
  9. I agree with once a timewaster, always a time waster, however - do you have any idea on the availability of Builder B or if he's as equally poor at communication? If you stick with A and August turns into October, are you going to wish you'd appointed B? I'd be asking builder B his availability and make a decision based on that. If he says he can't get to you until the end of the year, you are no better off. I had pretty much the same experience with my groundworker. Visited in June and took a couple weeks to 'quote'. Asked for that in writing which took another couple of weeks - which is absolutely fine, I realise people are busy and that part isn't what frustrated me. When he initially visited I asked on availability and was told 8/10 weeks. Turned out to be double that. Not an issue per se, but it was the poor communication and constant unknown as I would ring him and ask how many jobs he had in before me, and he couldn't (or wouldn't say). I was no doubt being pushed out for other jobs. I could accept that if it was actually communicated to me, not 'you're next I am just finishing a job' to then a few weeks later hear 'just doing a patio and then be with you'. Towards the end I was contemplating going elsewhere, but this guy did come as a recommendation, I had seen his work and was learning that communication is commonly poor and I'd no doubt have faced the same issues and even more delays so stuck with it in the end. EDIT - Skimmed past the fact he hadn't returned your calls or emails - sack him off in that case. Cynic in me wonders if people come crawling when they are otherwise light on work. These people are always on the ball enough to get home and ping out your invoice within an hour of leaving site on the last day aren't they
  10. I agree with once a timewaster, always a time waster, however - do you have any idea on the availability of Builder B or if he's as equally poor at communication? If you stick with A and August turns into October, are you going to wish you'd appointed B? I'd be asking builder B his availability and make a decision based on that. If he says he can't get to you until the end of the year, you are no better off. I had pretty much the same experience with my groundworker. Visited in June and took a couple weeks to 'quote'. Asked for that in writing which took another couple of weeks - which is absolutely fine, I realise people are busy and that part isn't what frustrated me. When he initially visited I asked on availability and was told 8/10 weeks. Turned out to be double that. Not an issue per se, but it was the poor communication and constant unknown as I would ring him and ask how many jobs he had in before me, and he couldn't (or wouldn't say). I was no doubt being pushed out for other jobs. I could accept that if it was actually communicated to me, not 'you're next I am just finishing a job' to then a few weeks later hear 'just doing a patio and then be with you'. Towards the end I was contemplating going elsewhere, but this guy did come as a recommendation, I had seen his work and was learning that communication is commonly poor and I'd no doubt have faced the same issues and even more delays so stuck with it in the end.
  11. Currently leaning towards giving it a punt myself, but still not at that stage yet so no doubt I’ll sway either way multiple times until I need to do something. I have taken down the end of the wall and noticed that the existing slab is floating in this corner. I’m assuming that’s just where the hardcore base slid down in to the front trench dug along the original door opening. I’ll know more as I knock the rest of the wall down when I finally have the garage door installed. Rather than cut that section out, would you push and whacked the hardcore against the void to fill it or perhaps allow the new concrete to spill under there to make it up? Don’t want it to crack when a car drives over it. The mind wanders when you have time to overthink rather than just get on with a job!
  12. I have nearly finished putting up a 40sqm ceiling. I used 9.5mm sheets (to match existing, and it's only a garage), straight edged (merchant doesn't supply tapered in 9.5). Therefore I have a fair amount of joints, all butted. I am looking at taping and filling. I bought some Gyproc 'FibaTape Xtreme' mesh tape as it's supposed to be nice and sticky. The existing section of ceiling boards are fibre backed paper taped. Would you remove the paper and replace with the mesh or just fill over the tape? It's quite well stuck so I am tempted to leave it unless renewing with FibaTape is likely to give a better chance of a half decent finish. Filler wise, I am looking at using this Gyproc stuff. British Gypsum Gyproc Joint Filler 12.5kg | Wickes.co.uk No idea how far this stuff goes when mixed. Potentially how long is a piece of string, but how many bags would you grab as a starter to give you decent chance of having enough? Does the filler and or plasterboard need sealing before painting over? I have considered having it skimmed to save the effort, but it's a garage and I need to reign it in.
  13. Started a ceiling at the weekend. Hadn't anticipated the noggins taking longer than getting the sheets up. Not helped by the fact I had a few boards up before I noticed the sag and had to climb in to the loft void to retrospectively fit
  14. My garage is accessible via the house and naturally fairly full of stuff, so I have had it extended with the intention to knock the existing outside wall down when the garage door has been added, which means the slab would be the last task. In hindsight maybe I should have built a partition running along the inside of the wall so it could be knocked down sooner, but it is what it is now. I will lap a membrane up against the existing slab and under the skirt that runs along the DPC of the new walls. I'm allowing for ~4" of concrete. Initially I'd intended to get someone in to lay and trowel the floor 'nicely' to match the existing as best as possible as I thought it may be beyond me to get a nice smooth finish on my own as I'm not particularly familiar with trowelling concrete. I am now wondering whether I could do it myself in a way where I am more likely to get a better result - perhaps tamp it as best I can and then self level over the entire floor for a seamless finish between old and new. What I would pay in self levelling compound would surely come in less than the labour element of having the slab laid, and may give me an overall better finish. My concern with the self levelling is the front edge threshold for driving over. Perhaps add a rubber seal to ramp over it so it doesn't crumble, or is it as firm as concrete? What would you do in my shoes? Opinions and other options to consider would be appreciated.
  15. Something like this will do you: DeLonghi 0148512201 De'Longhi DEX212F Dehumidifier, White, 300 W, 12 liters: Amazon.co.uk: Kitchen & Home You don't need 3. Move it around every now and then.