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Whoosh!


vivienz

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So not much happened on site today.

 

Hahahahhahaha!

 

Just kidding - the 'whoosh' of the entry title refers to the speed of the upper floor going up.  Just amazing.  Equally, though, it could refer to the rotor blades of a Royal Navy lynx helicopter.  Huh? Let me explain.  For some time now, ever since the slab started going down, in fact, there have been a couple of navy lynx helicopters that seem to have a regular route (I assume from RNAS Yeovilton as it's not that far away) passing not far from our site and they're generally over at least once a week.  Since the slab started going down, their fly-pasts have become a little closer each time and a little slower.  This afternoon, a single lynx flew over.  I mean right over.  Like, directly over head, banking steeply around the build at a very low level right over.  I'm sure I saw the pilot wave.  So, I'm just saying it now, but if MBC get an order from either aircrew or a pilot of a navy lynx helicopter, they know where to send the bottle of wine for the free advertising.

 

So, what did happen today?  Well, the final load of timber frame components arrived around mid-morning but the crane and MBC were there from early doors this morning, busy putting into place what was already on site.  First in were the south east and north west corner walls.

 

496594041_southbedroompanel.jpeg.7ed294ea1e0b83e2defbf4b8329ef2f2.jpeg

 

Then came the walls either side of the east and west gables:786131904_Eastgable.thumb.jpg.f97bd29def39593155c39eef94579f6a.jpg

 

147411014_Westgable.thumb.jpg.b6472d022180659614001ba99832fecd.jpg

 

Once the adjacent walls were in, the gable steels were craned in:

 

1452438357_Westgablesteel.thumb.jpg.42d99061c3ae741dda04fbcc1bcbd1dc.jpg

 

The east gable was done a little differently.  The steel was put in first, then the timber section placed on top:

 

1715888811_Eastgablesteel.thumb.jpg.23708728daa9e5af96458235dd46fda7.jpg

 

Here's a closer view of the east gable steel being worked on:

 

1147904483_Eastgablesteelcloseup.thumb.jpeg.ca60bce5a037ead0edc2cfd64dd03d38.jpeg

 

And here's one of the big side wall panels being craned in:

 

1362614347_Craningin.thumb.jpg.ff8cb16d93454b80aa4701d43e5098f3.jpg

 

Then the slightly different design for the south gable.  This doesn't have an apex in the glazing, so the section is done differently.

 

173547290_craninginsouthgable.thumb.jpg.bb730b18ec89d231e5cc31bd9570aa9d.jpg

 

Once the team broke for a late lunch, I scampered up and took a couple of photos from the scaffold for a different perspective:

 

 

710739336_ViewfromNEscaffold.thumb.jpg.485a7a52803f2e0d5819dfb0aa2438c1.jpg

 

By late afternoon, the full height opening for the stairwell window was all in and work was starting on the internal stud walls.

 

1521415426_Lateafternoon.thumb.jpg.ad0ad98a0f834a6baef044c7dc93f6ec.jpg

 

As well as the internal walls, the guys were prepping the top of the gables to receive the roof beams that will go in soon by cutting slots in the very top of the apex692636983_gableslotforbeam.thumb.jpg.0b5858411f8b0a4f0b5d3bddc72330d0.jpg.

 

92942319_bracedgableendslot.thumb.jpg.eb24fdc132d17e5bbe2118c59f06848d.jpg

 

Final pic for today that I know will excite all you construction fans, is the treatment of the steel beam ends and the glulams:

 

1581482354_tapeonsteelend.thumb.jpg.2e434b8401cf3511f9763f428398e127.jpg

 

So, what next?  Well, the scaffolders are due back tomorrow to put the second lift in place and make any adjustments that the MBC team need to do the final stages of the timber frame.

 

In addition, I'm still chasing down and getting more roofing quotes as my solar PV installation is due on 26th September and I still need to get the eaves course and velux windows sorted by then as I'm pushing my already extraordinarily good luck with the weather in getting weather-dependent jobs done that far into the autumn.  The glazing is also due that week, so I'm hoping for a good one!

 

I've got quite a few admin tasks to do and need to get to grips with the next section of workflow but I've been giving some attention to that today and will detail my 'next steps' in a separate post away from all this distracting timber frame porn.

 

Enjoy!

North upper wall.jpeg

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You did know that I used to be in charge of the entire Lynx fleet, as the Lynx Integrated Project Team Leader at Yeovilton, and the Programme Manager for Future Lynx (now Lynx Wildcat) didn't you?  Some of my former colleagues being curious, I rather suspect, especially as a couple of them came over to see our build going up.  IIRC, there's at least one other Lynx-connected individual with an MBC build, too.

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Amazing seeing it go up isn't it! Even though you read about it on here nothing can beat seeing your own go up. From nothing, to almost a house in a couple of days. Timber frame rocks lol. 

 

 

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Aha! Their secret is out now then, Jeremy! Honestly, I thought tgeir curiosity would snag them in the power lines as they came in so low!

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Looking really good Vivien, here's hoping the weather holds for you. Those big first floor windows are going to frame some stunning views for you.

 

(In my Lynx days we would just nip under any power lines ?)

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Thanks, Russel.

 

I'm going to ask the guys about covering the boards or taking precautions as we're due a day of heavy rain on Saturday.  Plenty of time for it to dry out, but I've seen too many puffed up egger board seams now to want to avoid this, if possible.

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Looking at the glue lines is a good way to check if you will have any issues - if they are swelled up and foamed properly then there won’t be a problem as the glue will have sealed all the edges. A sharp floor scraper will clear them off when they are properly cured. The problem usually occurs when they aren’t sealed on cut edges around openings and similar - brushing on some glue will help. 

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1 hour ago, PeterW said:

Looking at the glue lines is a good way to check if you will have any issues - if they are swelled up and foamed properly then there won’t be a problem as the glue will have sealed all the edges. A sharp floor scraper will clear them off when they are properly cured. The problem usually occurs when they aren’t sealed on cut edges around openings and similar - brushing on some glue will help. 

 

I'm on my way out there shortly, so I shall cast my beady eye over them.  There was plenty of foamy stuff over the board joins yesterday, but I didn't realise the significance of looking for it foaming over.  Thanks, Peter.

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