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So at the risk of this being too broad, I'm looking for info on how a modern self build in the Uk will use energy with a similar sort of breakdown to this:
image.png.4191096ee8d47aa4bb7412ccf6325964.png
 

 

Does anyone have any sources they can point me towards?
We aren't building to passivehous standards but above uk mandatory regs, meeting uk regs would be the ideal basis for this though

The context of this is that as a development (33 units) we are discussing different options regarding energy including the below:
PV and heat storage battery (individual or communal?)
PV and a microgrid 
PV and batteries (individual or communal?)

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I could probably put together something similar for our 130m2 house, but I'm not sure it would help you much, as we don't use any energy at all on balance, in fact we export more than the house uses.  Before I dig into the data, as a rough estimate I can say that water heating accounts for at least 40% of the total energy demand, with space heating being around 10 to 15% of the total at most, I think, and background loads being the next biggest energy demand.  The main background load for us is the sewage treatment plant blower, the MVHR fans and the water treatment UV disinfection unit, all of which are on 24/7, and which use around 3 kWh/day, so about 1100 kWh per year, about 30% of our total demand.  We tend to use about 4000 kWh/year, but generate a bit under 6000 kWh/year from solar panels on one face of the roof, hence the negative overall demand from the grid and negative CO2 emissions, despite the house being all electric.

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Well hopefully there won't be any airco costs if the development has been thought through.

 

EST may have some stats for you - probably worth dropping them an email: http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/

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To be honest, it depends very much on the usage patterns and house design, and it also varies tremendously by season.  We have a 3 person household, 2 retired and one live-in adult son effectively in his own flatlet in our loft. Ours is a passive-class new build electric only, and no PV because of planning restrictions. Our current daily energy bill is around £2.10 but a reasonable chunk of this is my son's 2×PC + 2×TVs. In the depths of winter it might get up to £6.50 if it is freezing outside, but we have no maintenance costs as we have no equipment like gas boilers or ASHPs that need annual service contracts.

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There are figures available from the Office of National Statistics that show usage.

Here is a link to a report that shows some typical regional figures, including E7, which is useful for heat loads and DHW loads.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171766_321960.pdf

 

But it really comes down to doing sensible estimates based on the typical usage.

 

As for PV, just design it in from the start, but make sure that the local DNO can approve it.

Batteries, why, they are too expensive, limited life and better off left to the DNO/Energy companies to develop.  People get very excited about them, I don't know why.

If you really want to use batteries, and save energy costs, then give an electric car with each purchase/lease.  That will have the biggest impact at the lowest cost.

 

I monitor my energy usage, it is easy as I am all electric, I hate Pie charts, but I do keep a record of the day/night split.

 

energy chart.jpg

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Thanks all, will follow the links and take a look.  Although the houses are all of similar construction we're trying to consider how they will be used in future as owners change as well as the best choices for the those involved now so looking at general usage should give a basis

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Sorry slightly OT but if you're looking at a development of 33 self builders, I bet there's plenty of things that could be coordinated to make economic that normally aren't. Ground source heat loops and rain/grey water recycling come to mind. And FTTP 🙂

Bet there's plenty more. 

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