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standing seam roof and roof lights


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Evening All .

looking into getting a standing seam roof anyone got experience of standing seam roofing and skylight /roof light installation into them .

seen a few you tube videos but not had any hands on experience with them .

any comments appreciated

regards

p

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What material you going with?

 

I understand that with steel, another more ductile material needs to be introduced for the flashings, which then does not give the traditional appearance.

 

I've gone with Aluminium in the end (was initially going with Colourcoat Urban), and here's mine (in progress):

 

Capture.JPG.2ef62a644b98d61ddd32af86f6e85884.JPG

 

My details a little more complex than it needs to be, with the extra 45 degree chamfer profile on top. I lined the outside of the up stand with celotex, but this was too wide for the roof light mount, so needed the 45 degree angle to bring the width back down to the width required by the mount.

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Mine is effectively a cold roof. ie. It's a warm roof with large ventilation gap.

 

There's a bit of change from £55 / m2 

 

I'd quoted it a year ago and Colourcoat Urban (steel) was significantly cheaper that other materials at circa. £40 /m2. But due to delays on my roof lights the original company were unable to install and I had to requote. When I requoted in November last year Colourcoat Urban prices had gone up significantly. Different installers quoting £60 - £75 /m2. I couldn't get any feedback from Tata themselves as to why the price increase.

 

Aluminium wasn't the absolute cheapest on the requote, but for me offered the best value solution. I also like the traditional hand-worked look of an ali roof.

 

The prices quoted do not include the required OSB deck, that most standing seam roofs require. If you hunt around and buy by the pallet you should be able to get 18mm OSB3 for about £3 - £5 / m2 + labour

Edited by IanR
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38 minutes ago, IanR said:

Mine is effectively a cold roof. ie. It's a warm roof with large ventilation gap.

 

Out of interest is your roof make up something like the tech drawing that I've shown below? I'm waiting for Tata to confirm the make up as it seems to be causing some confusion (largely caused by my architect!). Tata's technical guide isnt exactly clear on pitched roof makeup as to whether the ventilation gap is required in all scenarios.

I know @JSHarris considered Tata on his MBC build?

 

2017-03-07_12-09-04.jpg.3cb8d1bd699ad97b733029f7ed64c9cd.jpg

On the strength of this drawing I've suggested:

(from inside)

1.      15mm Plasterboard

2.      22mm Service Cavity Batten

3.      Airtight Membrane

4.      225mm Rafter

5.      Airtight Membrane

6.      50mm Counter Batten on Rafter

7.      18mm OSB3 Deck

8.      Breather Membrane

 

 

Edited by Barney12
Formatting error.
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While that's not like mine, I believe that will be OK, And it's reminded me that the deck is 18mm OSB3 not 22mmm (I'll correct my post)

 

Part of my Standing seam is on a buildup of 350mm I-Joist structure roof, fully filled with blown cellulose fibre, 16mm Egger DHF board, 50mm battening to create a ventilation gap and then 18mm OSB3, breather membrane and standing seam.

 

Tata actually looked at whether the ventilation gap was needed with the cellulose fibre fully filled roof, and their calculations said it wasn't. (Personally I wouldn't have gone without the ventilation gap)

Edited by IanR
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42 minutes ago, IanR said:

While that's not like mine, I believe that will be OK, And it's reminded me that the deck is 18mm OSB3 not 22mmm (I'll correct my post)

 

Part of my Standing seam is on a buildup of 350mm I-Joist structure roof, fully filled with blown cellulose fibre, 16mm Egger DHF board, 50mm battening to create a ventilation gap and then 18mm OSB3, breather membrane and standing seam.

 

Tata actually looked at whether the ventilation gap was needed with the cellulose fibre fully filled roof, and their calculations said it wasn't. (Personally I wouldn't have gone without the ventilation gap)

 

I think the issue is the same will the full fill on the MBC 225mm rafter (which is effectively a plated standard web joist). Its a detail which is not common. 

 

I agree with with you that having no ventilation gap "feels" wrong. 

 

Being an early adopter (in general UK building terms) is not much fun at times. It brings a lot of indecision from suppliers!!

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