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Sound proofing a garage


AndyW
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Hey guys, thank you so much for letting me join the forum. What a great place to find honest, experienced opinions and information.

 

I'm working on converting a garage into a soundproofed studio and need to work out some issues with insulation and particularly ventilation.

The room is 19.38 square metres so suitable for a mini-split system, which also means fewer holes in walls where sound could leak.

However, I can't find out whether this would satisfy Building regs.

Ideally it won't have opening windows or trickle vents, and only has one door to the house's hallway (ie doesn't access fresh external air).

I guess the alternative would be to have a constant air intake and out take with a heating/cooling system but obviously that's more holes, ducting and baffling. 

Any advice anyone has on this would be extremely useful.

Thanks so much,

Andy

 

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Sorry fella, i can't help, but i once built a free standing studio in a garden. I did it all out of twin wall timber, floor, wall, roof the lot. Everything was about 300mm thick. As i built it, i filled it all with dry fine sand. I put 2 double glazed windows in. The one on the outside normal. The one on the inside, i tilted it back at the top. This was to ensure that the 2 inner panes of glass were not parallel to the outside panes. I'd read somewhere about the angle breaking up the soundwave. I used a heavy fire door, and added insulation on the inside, and again did a second door, (One opening in, and One out) The outside door was a quality commercial one with good seals. The whole thing sat on brick piers built out of the ground, with thick rubber pads on the top of the piers. If i say so myself it was bloody fantastic, and a few hits were recorded in that place back in the day.

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On 05/12/2019 at 15:52, Big Jimbo said:

Sorry fella, i can't help, but i once built a free standing studio in a garden. I did it all out of twin wall timber, floor, wall, roof the lot. Everything was about 300mm thick. As i built it, i filled it all with dry fine sand. I put 2 double glazed windows in. The one on the outside normal. The one on the inside, i tilted it back at the top. This was to ensure that the 2 inner panes of glass were not parallel to the outside panes. I'd read somewhere about the angle breaking up the soundwave. I used a heavy fire door, and added insulation on the inside, and again did a second door, (One opening in, and One out) The outside door was a quality commercial one with good seals. The whole thing sat on brick piers built out of the ground, with thick rubber pads on the top of the piers. If i say so myself it was bloody fantastic, and a few hits were recorded in that place back in the day.

Haha, Creme Brulee! 

Thanks Jimbo, sounds like you built the real deal.

Maybe I should put some windows in to satisfy the building regs and sod the neighbours! 

Edited by AndyW
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I have a sound proof basement room. No windows, but needed a second door as per BC in case of fire as means of escape.

 

Ventilation is thorough the MVHR system, have fitted in line silencers to both incoming and outgoing ducts. These look a bit like car exhaust silencers.

 

Ventilation of some sort is essential what it will suffer from damp.

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9 hours ago, ragg987 said:

I have a sound proof basement room. No windows, but needed a second door as per BC in case of fire as means of escape.

 

Ventilation is thorough the MVHR system, have fitted in line silencers to both incoming and outgoing ducts. These look a bit like car exhaust silencers.

 

Ventilation of some sort is essential what it will suffer from damp.

Thank you, that's sound advice. Damp will certainly be a problem with sweaty musicians! 

Constant fresh air seems the way to go then, with those silencers.

So BC required two means of escape? I better look into that.

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