Student

Reducing size of existing extension

Recommended Posts

Hey

 

I've got a single storey extension attached to the back of a double storey extension (see image) that I'd like to reduce in Length. It's tacked onto the end of the kitchen and taking up valuable space in a very small courtyard garden.

 

It's an odd construction. The previous owners extended what was an outdoor toilet with concrete blocks (on their side, single skin) but left the exterior wall of the toilet in place and knocked a doorway through from the double extension. I'm looking to reduce it's size by 50% and may or may not keep the toilet in there, we just want the space for a washing machine and a tall freezer and a tiny bit of storage.

 

Should I just completely knock it down at start again? My original, quick and cheap plan was to run a cut off saw along the existing walls, knock down what I don't need and then build a stud wall, insulate and clad. Anyone foresee any issues with this? I'm open to carrying out a better solution in the future but time is of the essence at the moment. The only thing stopping me from knocking it down completely is disposing of the blockwork will be a pain and I don't have access to the party wall side of the extension as there's a brick wall along the boundary of unknown quality. I guess if it was a decent brick wall I could just fix a stud wall straight to it?

 

Appreciate any insight
 

extension.png

roof1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the wall it backs onto?  Joined to the party wall or is there a gap?  Is the party wall at that point a building or just a garden wall?

 

Personally I would leave it, you can never have too much covered space, even if it is only for storage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave. It runs parallel to a brick garden wall and there's a small gap, maybe an inch or two. My worry is that any new wall placed there would have access issues to the base of the wall. As I say, could potentially secure new wall to the brick garden wall but not sure who it belongs to and if it's of decent construction. Could risk it, but also concerned that damp may be brought through it or would damp proofing measures negate that risk?

 

I hear what you're saying, many have suggested leaving it but halving its size doubles the garden space at the end of it, taking it from somewhere you could store a few bins to somewhere you could put a table a chairs and a bbq, You know how important a bbq is! It's also the only part of the garden that gets decent sun.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A picture looking the other way may illustrate the garden issue, it must be small.

 

If you do want to shorten it, just leave whatever bit of back wall you are keeping, and just rebuild the end wall in it's new position. No need to over complicate it by dismantling and rebuilding the back wall is there?

 

EDIT: by BACK I mean the wall that is close to the party wall, Front being the wall with the door, end being where you are going to chop it off and shorten it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the planning status of the second extension? I suspect the previous owner might have needed planning permission either because it extends too far to the rear of the house or because more than half the original garden has now been built on? Might be worth checking the planning portal on-line to see if PP exists just so you know what you might be getting into.

 

If they didn't get permission a neighbour could cause you some trouble by complaining. If built more than 4 years ago the planners can't make you knock it all down as it's too late for them to initiate enforcement action. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My only reason for potentially wanting to knock it down completely is because it's a cold 'room', very thin walls, not insulted. I know I can add those things but almost seems like more sense to start from scratch.

 

I've owned the property 3 years, I'd envision the extension was built well over 20 years ago and when the house was bought, there wasn't a sniff of planning permission for anything that had been done, including knocking through of a supporting wall but the house was cheap and in a good location, so what can you do? Indemnity insurance!

 

In theory, if I were to run a circular saw up the walls and knock down the unwanted sections, anything I should be aware of when tying a new timber framed wall into it? I don't see the point of using blockwork, it's not supporting any weight at all really. corrugated sheet roof and that's it. Won't be putting anything heavy on the walls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now