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Vertical condensate drain


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In the following diagram, 8,9 and 10 are condensate drains in the loft:

 

 

 

condenstaedrains.thumb.jpg.0bdc8839156602913c54d764cc8bfb62.jpg

The diagram suggests that these condensate drains should connect to a commonn 40mm pipe to exit the wall to connect to the external SVP at 12.

On the ground floor where indicated there is a cloakroom waste that exits under the slab and a service void to the loft for the MVHR ducts. 

 

Would it be better to connect the condensate drains to a common pipe running down through the service void to the cloakroom waste below?  That would save a penetration through the wall to the external SVP, which in a passive build I am trying to keep to a minimum.

 

Is there a vertical drop limit for a condensate drain?  Would the dripping of condensate be too noisy in the cloakroom below?  Is running the condensate drain to the external SVP the best approach?

 

 

Edited by Mr Blobby
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Keep internal. Hardly any flow from and mvhr unless in the depths of a cold, damp winter. Even then it will creep down the sides of the pipe. Fyi my condensate drains are only 22mm until they connect to a 40mm branch at an appliance.

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9 hours ago, PeterW said:

Why so many condensate drains and what are they for ..?

MVHR + FCU's.

 

16 hours ago, Mr Blobby said:

Is there a vertical drop limit for a condensate drain?  Would the dripping of condensate be too noisy in the cloakroom below?  Is running the condensate drain to the external SVP the best approach?

Scrap the idea of the 40mm pipe to outside, that's mental. Route as you say to the cloakroom waste and run it all in 21.5mm condensate pipe as there will be only a thimble full of water going down the pipe at worst. You can mount the pipe off the true vertical rise eg so any drip where the pipe goes from 1st floor horizontal to the vertical drop cannot give you a drip-drip noise, simply by installing it 2 pipe widths off vertical so the water droplets ( even though..........

 

14 minutes ago, Conor said:

it will creep down the sides of the pipe

 

........is typically correct ) cannot fall the full length of the pipe, as you certainly would hear a drip of water falling 1 storey and hitting the pipe again where it returned to horizontal at the cloakroom.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, PeterW said:

And why an external soil stack ..? Can you not get internal ..?

 

We did look at this and an internal SVP is more difficult here as it would need to run through the kitchen below.  This pipe needs to vent outside as furthest from sewer, where the other soil pipe in the house vents internally to AAV

Also this side of the house is on the blind side next to the boundary and not visible from anywhere unless you go look for it.

 

 

Thanks all for your input.  It's good to know I wasn't imagining the proposed changes to the layout as being a bit, well, carp.  Internally routed condensate drains it is then.

Edited by Mr Blobby
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12 hours ago, PeterW said:

Why so many condensate drains and what are they for ..?

 

To answer your question properly.....

 

condensate-drains.jpg.e0f046f0c7099308bde5af5bf58cee44.jpg

 

 

 

... roof is warm roof construction.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

So, to round this off, here's the first floor plumbing into the same external SVP:

 

pipes-into-SVP.thumb.jpg.f97e92dd243528f626ab9224bd0777fa.jpg

 

 

All pipes into the SVP are from the first floor bathroom and run through the ceiling void above the kitchen that can be seen in the image.

16:WC

11: Shower

10: Bath

9: sink

All fairly straightforward. 

 

The drawing appears to show, however, that each pipe penetrates the wall seperately to connect to the SVP externally, which seems bonkers to me.  I assume this is just a drawing convention, and in reality the pipes will connect in the ceiling void for a single penetration through the wall to the SVP. 

 

Am I correct to expect the pipes to connect internally to give just one wall penetration?  If so then should the diagram be amended to make this explicit to show a single penetration in the wall? 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Mr Blobby
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