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Adding cladding to porch - permission required?


Senzubeansoup
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Hello everyone, 

 

I was hoping to obtain some advice in respect of a small bit of home renovation my partner and I wish to carry out. 

 

We live in an Edwardian mid-terrace, our first home, which is neither listed nor in an area with additional planning restrictions (conservation area etc). 

 

A small indoor porch (about 3m squared) was built onto the front of the property at some point in the last 30 years or so, a breezeblock construction topped with white rendering.

 

This modern look really clashes with the original brickwork of the house, so my partner and I were thinking of having brick slip cladding matching the rest of the house fitted to the external porch walls.

 

As far as I can see, planning permission would not be required provided that the materials used are of similar appearance to those used in the construction of the house.

 

My confusion arises with the "similar appearance" part. Brick slips would match the brickwork of the house, but they'd be a significant change from the white rendering on the porch. So with that in mind, I'm not sure how to interpret the "similar appearance" rule.

 

I'd be very grateful if someone with some experience could share their thoughts, as there doesn't seem to be much info available online! 

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In the old days if you spoke to a planner about this they would probably say that you should not have asked.

 

As long as all you say is correct about the absence of any planning constraints then you can do it.

It might be prudent to tell your neighbours your plans. then if nobody complains there is no aggro.

A change of brick size is common enough with any old building, as long as you get the colour right.

 

How will the slips be fixed?

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+1 

 

If under 3 sqm you could probably knock the whole porch down and rebuild it without need planning permission. I would just get on and do the clading.

 

Take photos first and ideally annotate one set with dimensions so nobody can argue you've changed it in some other way such as making it a lot bigger. 

 

If a someone was to complain to the planners and they felt that planning permission was required they would first send you a letter. The letter will look scary and talk about enforcement action etc but dont panic as its intended to persuade you to engage with the planners. What you do is call up and ask what you need to do. Most likely they will say you need to make a retrospective Planning Application and they will wave it through. Sometimes they have to be seen to follow the due process when someone makes a complaint. Other times they just want the application fee. 

 

I recommend making up a test panel with a few slips and mortar and let it dry fully to be sure of a good match to the house. A slight difference in mortar colour can change the way the bricks look quite a bit. 

 

Do the neighbours have similar rendered porches or are theirs brick?

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Project that will cost £200 plus your own labour?

Add Planning fee £120 and drawings and submission etc. Submission by yourself? Amateur sketches and a photo should suffice.

 

There is another option.  Letter to planners stating what you intend an asking if it requires permission and an application. They will likely say 'no' and you are in the clear.

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9 hours ago, saveasteading said:

Letter to planners stating what you intend an asking if it requires permission and an application. They will likely say 'no' and you are in the clear.


Isn’t that what the LDC application is for? Unless you have a “very” helpful LPA who would offer that kind of advice?

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1 hour ago, DevilDamo said:

LDC application

Not the way I understand it. It is what I would do anyway: either that or after research just do it if I was confident of the proposed works.

 

You are right that some councils may not assist in the slightest. Others may say it is their opinion that it doesn't need permission, or fill in the forms and send money..

 

But without checking fees, for such a small project you would be looking at similar fees for full planning or LDC. £120 or so??

 

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