LSB

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  1. Hello, we are looking to buy a digger at the moment, just a little one as we have some narrow spaces to get in. Chinese ones seems to be good value for money / cheap compared with other makes. But, are they a waste of time and if we decided to buy a new one, which we could do for a 2nd hand Yanmar, then are we going to lose everything when we sell it when we have finished digging all the holes and trenches that we possibly need. We have really struggled to get one as 2nd hand ones that seem decent goes for lots of money and very quickly and we don't want to get ripped off. We are going to look at a dealer who sells shiny new ones tomorrow, including chinese ones, but wanted an idea of which is the best direction. Thanks
  2. I usually post my blog entries on a Wednesday, but somehow it didn't happen this week. This week I have submitted the application to discharge our planning conditions. Although there were 5 listed, one was to say 'do what you have plans for' and the other 4 were all to do with contamination. Condition 2 was to get a phase 2 contamination report and 3,4,5 were all to do with remediation if any contamination was found. The report was 72 pages, guess that's where 5k goes, and said negligible / low for everything, so there is no remediation to be done. I was hoping that discharging the conditions would be a quick process, not realising that it follows the full planning process as per a new application. So, after hoping to start on the barn soon we can't do anything until this is approved. I must also do the CIL commencement form as well, although I might as well just get on with that now. It's occurred to us over the last few weeks that all the 'stuff' in the barn currently needs a new home, either long-term or temporarily during the build. Down the slope near the house we have brick buildings used historically for the pigs which we used for the bikes. Unfortunately, over the last few years the already dodgy roof collapsed in almost completely when the main rafters broke. This was probably because the front and back of the pig sty had a major argument and decided to go their separate ways. One part forward and one part backwards. The plan was always to knock this down, and we still will in due course, but in the meantime we are rebuilding it for storage with a lean to on the sides for the tractor and dumper. We are almost entirely using stuff we have lying around, except for joist hangers and nails. The huge cracks have not changed in years, not even when we removed the old roof, actually that was probably part of the problem as it was very heavy. We already have metal roofing sheets removed from some other sheds that were knocked down, there is probably not enough for everything, but as we have the barn roof to take down we can finish then. We are hoping to get the roof on the first side this weekend, then I can start moving all the wood. It has become clear that I'm going to need to install some stables as the horses are out 24/7, with just a couple of shelters. Not a problem until something goes wrong and you need to shut them somewhere. I also need a new tack room as the current one is in the barn and somewhere to keep the hay / straw / feed. To avoid another planning application I've decided to get some that are on 'skids' and not foundations so technically moveable. Thankfully, this won't come out of the build budget as I keep virtual pots of money for various things, such as animals, cars, bills etc and the animal pot has enough for this. Next week, it's continuing with looking at what's needed for the new build, including door furniture and tying down the windows I want versus the ones we can afford.
  3. Here are all the planning conditions, because the step 2 phase 2 contamination survey found no issues it means that conditions 3, 4 and 5 are included in the report for step 2. Step 6, is just ongoing. So, nothing about any of the normal countryside things like ecology and landscaping. 1. The development hereby permitted shall be completed in all respects strictly in accordance with Site Location + Block Plan and Plans and Elevations received 29/05/2020, for which permission is hereby granted or which are subsequently submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority and in compliance with any conditions imposed by the Local Planning Authority. Reason: For the avoidance of doubt as to what has been considered and approved. 2. No development (including any construction, demolition, site clearance or removal of underground tanks and relic structures) approved by this planning permission, shall take place until a site investigation consisting of the following components has been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the local planning authority: As deemed necessary following the desk study and site reconnaissance an intrusive investigation(s), including: - the locations and nature of sampling points (including logs with descriptions of the materials encountered) and justification for the sampling strategy; - an explanation and justification for the analytical strategy; - a revised conceptual site model; and - a revised assessment of the risks posed from contamination at the site to relevant receptors, including: human health, ground waters, surface waters, ecological systems and property (both existing and proposed). All site investigations must be undertaken by a competent person and conform with current guidance and best practice, including: BS 10175:2011+A1:2013 and CLR11. Reason: To ensure that risks from land contamination to the future users of the land and neighbouring land are minimised, together with those to controlled waters, property and ecological systems, and to ensure that the development can be carried out safely without unacceptable risks to workers, neighbours and other offsite receptors. 3. No development (including any construction, demolition, site clearance or removal of underground tanks and relic structures) approved by this planning permission, shall take place until a detailed remediation method statement (RMS) has been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the LPA. The RMS must include, but is not limited to: - details of all works to be undertaken including proposed methodologies, drawings and plans, materials, specifications and site management procedures; - an explanation, including justification, for the selection of the proposed remediation methodology(ies); - proposed remediation objectives and remediation criteria; and - proposals for validating the remediation and, where appropriate, for future maintenance and monitoring. The RMS must be prepared by a competent person and conform to current guidance and best practice, including CLR11. Reason: To ensure that risks from land contamination to the future users of the land and neighbouring land are minimised, together with those to controlled waters, property and ecological systems, and to ensure that the development can be carried out safely without unacceptable risks to workers, neighbours and other offsite receptors. 4. Prior to any occupation or use of the approved development the RMS approved under condition 2 must be completed in its entirety. The LPA must be given two weeks written notification prior to the commencement of the remedial works. Reason: To ensure that risks from land contamination to the future users of the land and neighbouring land are minimised, together with those to controlled waters, property and ecological systems, and to ensure that the development can be carried out safely without unacceptable risks to workers, neighbours and other offsite receptors. 5. A validation report must be submitted to and approved in writing by the LPA prior to any occupation or use of the approved development. The validation report must include, but is not limited to: - results of sampling and monitoring carried out to demonstrate that the site remediation criteria have been met; - evidence that any RMS approved in pursuance of conditions appended to this consent has been carried out competently, effectively and in its entirety; and - evidence that remediation has been effective and that, as a minimum, the site will not qualify as contaminated land as defined by Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Reason: To ensure that risks from land contamination to the future users of the land and neighbouring land are minimised, together with those to controlled waters, property and ecological systems, and to ensure that the development can be carried out safely without unacceptable risks to workers, neighbours and other offsite receptors. 6. In the event that contamination which has not already been identified to the Local Planning Authority (LPA) is found or suspected on the site it must be reported in writing immediately to the Local Planning Authority. Unless agreed in writing by the LPA no further development (including any construction, demolition, site clearance, removal of underground tanks and relic structures) shall take place until this condition has been complied with in its entirety. An investigation and risk assessment must be completed in accordance with a scheme which is subject to the approval in writing of the Local Planning Authority. The investigation and risk assessment must be undertaken by competent persons and conform with prevailing guidance (including BS 10175:2011+A1:2013 and CLR11) and a written report of the findings must be produced. The written report is subject to the approval in writing of the Local Planning Authority. Where remediation is necessary a detailed remediation method statement (RMS) must be prepared, and is subject to the approval in writing of the Local Planning Authority. The RMS must include detailed methodologies for all works to be undertaken, site management procedures, proposed remediation objectives and remediation criteria. The approved RMS must be carried out in its entirety and the Local Planning Authority must be given two weeks written notification prior to the commencement of the remedial works. Following completion of the approved remediation scheme a validation report that demonstrates the effectiveness of the remediation must be submitted to and approved in writing by the LPA. Reason: To ensure that risks from land contamination to the future users of the land and neighbouring land are minimised, together with those to controlled waters, property and ecological systems, and to ensure that the development can be carried out safely without unacceptable risks to workers, neighbours and other offsite receptors
  4. remarkably they are the only 3, we were really surprised and the 2 barns being converted nearby both have 12. Perhaps it is because I submitted so many reports and had to apply multiple times
  5. planning submitted by me via the planning portal
  6. for a phase 2 contamination survey to be carried out. the other 2 were if the above found contamination, but as nothing was found then there is no remediation report or action to be taken.
  7. Please can I have some help on how to discharge conditions. All I can find on the planning site is how much it costs, not how to do it. I have 3 conditions, but they are all linked so I want to discharge them all in one go. Thanks
  8. LSB

    Air test

    good luck with the twins, when they are older, if they are anything like mine, the doors will always be opened anyway.
  9. not sure about that, my brother still lives in the area and he says it is really expensive, cheap areas are Sadly Broke, Southmead, Knowle West and any of the huge ex local authority estates, like Hartcliffe. But, I now live on the East Coast (Suffolk not USA) so I may well be out of date.
  10. It's funny how things change, I grew up very close to hotwells in Ashton (not Long Ashton) near the cumberland basin and hotwells was somewhere to be avoided, and don't get me started on Bemy, total dump back then, but now read hot spot. Wish we'd stayed in our 3 bed victorian town house, which my parents sold because it was too big and bought a ex council semi.
  11. that's good, for once not the expensive stuff.
  12. another question on this, when I plasterboard internally, what is the best tape to use to stop cold bridging.
  13. Yesterday, ahead of schedule, we received our phase 2 contamination survey report. No surprises, but it's good to hear that everything is good. The report is 72 pages long, but then for the cost of it I expect to have lots of detail. It's been a long drag to get this far with difficulty getting planning permission and needing lots of reports, surveys and plans We went into this process thinking that we would spend up to 10k trying to get planning and then stop, but in the end it has cost nearly 22k all of which comes out of the build budget. Of course, we are one of the lucky few that can afford to go through this process and then build our custom house, not only the house we really want, but for much less than we would have to pay for it, even if we could find it, particularly in a location like we live in. We are not a very social couple so like living in a rural location without any close neighbours and being able to convert a barn that we already own has removed both the cost and the difficulty of finding a plot. The conversion is slightly smaller than our current house, but as a single story we should never have to move. HID wanted to build something smaller, but I put my foot down saying that I wanted the space for visiting family so we have gone for 4 beds and an office. A point that was emphasised when one of the girls moved back in Monday after splitting up with her partner of 4 years. I have been told by friends that grown up children cannot wait to leave, but do have a tendency to move back at regular intervals. After 2 years alone it's quite odd to have someone else in the house. She wants to move into our residential log cabin, but that is my site office and I'm loath go lose it. I expect I will have to though and it will probably be better that having to look after her again. At least in the cabin she can be independent. Having received the report I now need to discharge the condition, luckily the only one. Then notify the CIL that we wish to commence and off we go. We planned to start in the spring, but now might try some demolition of parts of the barn that are not usable. The first part is removing the asbestos roof from the 'L' part of the barn. One of the specialist jobs, although we are getting the skip ourselves and wrapping it in DPM. I've found that ordering the skip myself is half the price of the contractors bring their own, pity it can only be used for the roof. When I get time I am going to cover up and get close to measure and count how many sheets there are so I can calculate the size skip needed, also to understand the ridge, which is curved. HID has been working on the old bike shed, this has a serious case of subsidence, we were going to knock it down as the roof had collapsed as well. Then we realised that we are in desperate need of storage during the build so a new roof is in progress, which in turn will hold the front and back walls together (we hope). It can then be knocked down when we have finished. At one point I was thinking of using these sheds for the horses, but when we looked closer it became obvious that if they rubbed on it then it would collapse. Right, well back to the estimating, tonight I'm looked at cladding and trying to decide which wood I like best, Red Cedar or Douglas Fir and trying not to think about the cost.
  14. that sounds good. Do note though some of the earlier comments in this thread that once the RHI for solar stopped the price reduced hugely. So, unless your timing works out it may not be a problem. We are DIY builders and haven't started yet, so won't be getting ours for a couple of years, so I'm going to have to hope the price will reduce.
  15. I got it from the Homebuilding & Renovating Magazine, sounds like it has been extended since they went to print.