DundeeDancer

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About DundeeDancer

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  1. Same as me but every year I tell Plusnet that I will leave and they bring down the price to a sensible level. Currenty 18 month fixed price @ £25 for Fibre 40mbps, free evening and weekend calls. This year I also managed to get the router updated. You need to tell them the deal you will move to if they do nothing, I usually quote TalkTalk and when they say you know how bad they are I just reply, well I had them for 5 years before and they were fine so give me a decent deal. Go get them Jeremy!
  2. To clarify my understanding of when it is not worth installing an MVHR system is when there are to many gaps in the fabric of the building that allows a certain percentage of cold air to be sucked into the building through the fabric and not via the MVHR inlet manifold. So this external cold air is just seeping into the building without going past the MVHR heat exchanger. In this scenario a few undesirable processes are occurring:- 1. Cold air is seeping into the building without being warmed up by the MVHR system so cold drafts occur in the dwelling. 2. The stale air does not move so readily between the rooms to then be used by the MVHR system to heat up the fresh air from the MVHR inlet. These points mean the efficiency of the system is significantly reduced and with the volume of air that goes through MVHR system it may well be possible that the MVHR system then starts to significantly chill the dwelling. The only way to stop this drop in efficiency of the system is to ensure there is a good airtight barrier in the dwelling apart from the MVHR systems inlets and outlets. The only way to get to the point of sufficient airtightness is to install an airtight barrier behind plasterboard and ceilings etc. So this takes a deep refurbishment project to install correctly or to be installed on initial build. In summary I believe installing an MVHR system will always help with air-freshness and de-humidifying a dwelling but if the air-tightness of the dwelling is not up to standard then in effect the system will be bringing to much cold air into the property via the gaps in fabric of the building and chilling the building. This is my laymen’s understanding of why installing an MVHR system may be folly. I do wonder if I am missing any other points? Many thanks, DD.
  3. I use one called Green Eye, pretty much the one below. It's been pretty good. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gain-Express-Temperature-Laboratory-Classroom/dp/B00OXMVJME/ref=sr_1_51?keywords=co2+monitor&qid=1576773418&sr=8-51
  4. Interesting post there Jeremy, after I complete my PhD into human biology maybe I’ll understand it a bit more. 😄 Not sure what to make of the new a/c unit in my office, it’s blowing away making a din of about 52dB, the temp is a chilly 21.4c 1,300ppm Hum 42%. Yesterday it was quite quiet, 24c, 900ppm and it felt normal to me. Strange I feel cold here at work at 21.4c but feel fine at home at 21.7c without a/c. I can’t figure it out.
  5. From what I've read 800-900ppm is about ideal in that it means the room is not being over ventilated. I haven’t got my figures to hand but in my current bedroom if we sleep with the door closed then by around 7am in the morning the ppm will be around the 2000 mark. Also if it is cold outside say under 4c then the windows will covered in condensation. With the door open all night it will average around 1500ppm at 7am which doesn’t feel to uncomfortable. Not that long ago the wife and I went and stayed in a posh hotel up in the Highlands, was a bit of a drive to get there but when we did I had a little lay down on the bed and before I knew it I was snoozing and very doozy. I then looked at my CO2 monitor I thought it must be faulty as was reading about 3,500ppm. The room couldn’t have been ventilated from the night before and the lack of oxygen was making me sleepy. 😴
  6. I’m enjoying this thread as I have a plan to do a bare bones refurbishment on the apartment I live in. Second floor apartment with solid concrete floor and ceiling. Going back to bare bones to hopeful get the apartment airtight enough to get a good return on the heat recovery element of the MVHR system and to significantly add to the insulation levels as well. Plan is to gut the flat, install at least 20mm of inner wall insulation on all surfaces and 50mm onto external facing walls, new triple glazing, new lightweight underfloor heating, re-wire, re-plaster new kitchen and two new bathrooms. I’ll be looking at a price tag of around £70k. So I don’t won’t want to be investing in “Bogus” technologies. Having stayed in a few places that have MVHR systems installed then I believe they are slightly over-hyped. One place I stayed I noticed the MVHR system wasn’t switched on. I had a decent sleep without the MVHR switch on but the CO2 levels did build up to around 1,500 ppm. When the owner looked at the MVHR system he said that he must have forgot to switch the system on since he last change of the filters about 8 weeks ago! None of his other guests has noticed! With the MVHR system on low the CO2 levels were around 900ppm which were decent. To me it is the cumulative effect of all the following that justify the system installation: pollen free air, less dust mites, less humidity, reduction in heating bills. Adding all that up makes the investment worthwhile I think but to be honest am not 100% sure yet so the plan stays on the drawing board for a little while longer. Definitley need to get it done before I'm 60 and start to really feel the cold nights, so that just gives me a dacade or so to play with before fully committing. 😊
  7. GD series 20 episode 4 Hull - underground water reservoir. Inspiring in many ways but at the same time totally bonkers. Volume of living area about 9 times the size of normal family homes. Would love to know what the heating bills would be like to bring that mosnter accommodation up to 22c. Cold bridges galore along with mega concrete heat sinks for walls with no insulation behind or in front. Ideal I guess if you enjoy your environment to be a cool 11c all year around 🥶 Need more details, program should be called Grand Hidden Designs ☺️
  8. My experience with countertop wash basins is it is hard work to get the set-up correct. I planned one with a nice quartz top. Started off order this this one:- https://www.betterbathrooms.com/p/oval-countertop-basin But it turned out to have an extra underflow bit of the bottom so won't fit flat on the quartz top without cutting a big shape in the bottom. So after a lot of hassle managed to swap it for this one:- https://www.betterbathrooms.com/p/pacific-counter-top-basin Was still a hassle as was fitting it into an Ikea cabinet and I had to search hard to find correct plumbing for it. Then it got fitted but because the toilet waste had to run under the counter top cabinet, the cabinet had to have it's legs set to maximum and so the counter-top sits a little high for people to wash there face in. Also selecting the right high tap is not that easy either. I like what I ended up with, it looks great, turned out to be hard work to get there and expensive. See
  9. Back in 2016 I bought Greenwood Desktop CO2/RH/Temp 3 in 1 Monitor with Data Logger Logging, Indoor Air Quality 9999 ppm Carbon Dioxide/Temperature Deg C/F/Humidity Meter. I've found it to be a good piece of kit! https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00MB93GH2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I don't find rooms stuffy until they get over 2,000 ppm although I try to keep the night time CO2 levels down to around 1,200 ppm in my own bedroom by keeping the bedroom door open.(No MVHR as yet but plans in the pipeline) I once felt very sleepy in a hotel room and when I turned on my CO2 logger the reading was at 3,500 ppm! I was OK 10 minutes after I fully opened the window and ventilated the room. I've read in a few places that if the room in use is ventilated to over 800 ppm then your probably over ventilating the area. Best wishes, DD.
  10. Hello Buildhub people, Looking for a little advice once more. 😊 About 6 months ago in a flat I let out. I had an old system boiler replaced with a new combi boiler and the fitting company said they could take away the hot and cold water tanks and run everything off the mains. Seemed like a good idea at the time but now I'm a little worried that everything hasn't been thought through. The boiler is operating fine. It's the toilet that is the current problem but I'm also worried about the bathroom taps. I think running from mains pressure is possible too much for the current plumbing. The ball-cock fitting in the toilet, when I had the lid off the force of the water on refill caused considerable spray all over me and half the room. I've manage to tweak the main pressure inside the flat's by turning the stop-cock all the way down so only half the force of the water comes out but I'm not convinced this is a long term solution. Maybe I need to consider getting fitted a water pressure reducing valve into the system or changing toilet ball-cock and taps into ones that can handle high pressure. Wonder is the electric show is OK with the increased pressure. Any advice appreciated. Best wishes, DD.
  11. If I was in your shoes Hecateh, I would feel out my depth so would be looking to get some independent advice from some with extensive residential building experienced that could come to site and run through the plans and costs and sanity check things over. Maybe some with more Project Management experience could give guidance. Might cost you another £300 or so but you might be able to sleep easier at night. Best of luck! DD xx
  12. Many thanks Ferdinand for your insight. Very interesting to read that you find the noise acceptable. It therefore makes me hopeful that it is my particular fan. As the fan is still in warranty I have asked for a replacement. I will therefore go to the effort of switching it over to see if a difference occurs. That will mean me wrestling with fitting the fan again but brings another opportunity to get it aligned exactly right with the fan body and sleeve pipe in the core hole. That had proved more difficult than I had anticipated. I think the problem being is I put the fan holes in the faceplate before the sleeve pipe was in place. Should have done that part the other way about but to be honest not much tolerance to play with so a bit of a testing job fitting these units. The Tempra is marked in green in my plan as Fan B, so it's in the bathroom and nothing nearby to reflect the noise. As you mentioned before it does produce a bit of a draft when someone is bathing or showering but the fans couldn't be configured any other way due to pipe works in the black-box. Maybe in 15 years time when the fans start to show there age I will replace with an MVHR system but that wasn't in the budget/schedule for this round of works. Cheers DD
  13. Finally got Nuaire Cyan and Vent-Axis Tempra fans operational after installing them on top of my own constructed face-plates. In trickle mode the Cyan is almost silent but the Vent-Axis Tempra is quite noisy, so noisy that I am starting to think it might be faulty. The Tempra specification says at 6 liters a second trickle mode that the sound produced should be 20 dB but it's much louder than that. I loaded an app onto my phone and that thinks it is around 33 dB. Anyone else found the Tempra noisy? Ferdinand?
  14. I’m on the lookout for a trades person than can properly install a single room Heat Recovery Vent into a 2nd floor flat. I put details about how the job is around 7.5m off the ground in this thread:- I thinking on using one of the “Trust a trader” type sites from the following list but unsure what one to try first:- www.trustatrader.com www.mybuilder.com www.ratedpeople.com www.myjobquote.co.uk I did try and go with a recommendation but the person said they would come the next week to check the job out and then never returned any of my texts after that. Any tips or recommendation appreciated. Thanks, DD.
  15. @MikeSharp01 There is not much of a relationship left from my end. The build contractor has made it clear he feels he has finished on-site with handing back the keys even though we are still to go through a 3 months defect fixing period and the Architect seems perfectly comfortable arguing against anything I say, even if it is the same thing he said 2 minutes earlier. I've been pretty good at logging any issues in an "issues document" and emailing it to both parties every week which the Architect took great objection to saying it was to much to read. Well if the builder spoke to me say one a week or fix the problems then I could take items off the list and there won't be so much to read. I did email them on 15th of January to say "For every extra week the project is delayed in effect means another £200 in lost earnings for us with the flat not being let out." So I set a marker down back 4 weeks ago, so that would be £800. It's not so much about the money and more about being fair, honest and treating people with respect. I'm not happy with being taken advantage of and them not caring that their actions (or lack of actions and carelessness) have an effect on me and my good wife. We are not cash cows to be milked.