iMCaan

Members
  • Content Count

    23
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

About iMCaan

  • Rank
    Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Unfortunately, the site slopes quite a lot from the road towards the back of the house. We purposely raised the FGFL because the driveway was too steep, from front wall to road. We probably don't have much choice but to backfill. We're not using Aerated trench blocks. These are just concrete blocks . Yes, mobility ramps are planning condition. Hopefully, putting a French drain around the outside of the house will capture the rain water and redirect it. Thus, stop charging the water table beneath the house (thanks YouTube content creators). Therefore, no water to come up from the ground. There was no ground water since excavating the footings in October. We had heavy rain a week ago and some snow which I think has charged the water table. Hopefully, putting the French drain will resolve the issue.
  2. iMCaan

    Water Seepage

    Thank you. I reckon the water seepage location is about half a meter below block and beam floor. French drains is a good idea (only idea so far ). The water seepage is in the middle of the house so running French drains outside of the house would have to go trough trench blocks. Could this create issues later on? Thanks
  3. I have water seepage on site. I have create another post to keep it separate.
  4. Oh boy. We have placed some hardcore so that a lorry could get to the back. Delivery lorries and hiab have gone to almost back of the site.
  5. iMCaan

    Water Seepage

    Hi We are just in the process of building a house and are currently working on substructure. I have found the location of the water seepage. It's right in the centre of the house. It's small amount of seepage but it builds up and we have to pump it out every couple of hours. We have not had rain for a few days. The site slopes from the road towards the back of the house. There are no drains on higher end (front of the house). The bay window trenches, on the higher end of the slope, are dry. Any advise how this water seepage could be stopped? Thanks iMCaan
  6. I'm novice and I welcome constructive input. Never know what will be beneficial.
  7. At one stage he almost did but was very hard worker. The site had houses on there but they were demolished, years before I purchased it. The whole street has houses, and there are houses either side of the build site. Also, new builds further down the street, but it still took me over 8 years to get the planning approved. All thanks to the architect (lazy) and damn councillors. The architect was a nightmare.
  8. The site slopes from the footpath towards the back. If I remember correctly, the site engineer said there's about 1.5meter difference.
  9. No, I didn't retain any subsoil as the sub contractor said it was no good. It had too many roots. Big relief smile on my face. Great. I told them to use as much mortar as they like. I want to foundations to be as solid as possible.
  10. Site marking out and finished ground floor level rod/marker.
  11. The site engineer did all the markings and placed pins (on top of foundation) at each corner for the bricklayers. He also, placed a metal rod in the ground with finished GF level. The bricklayers are working from these levels. We're going to have even number of courses of blocks. The site slopes from front to back so will backfill to raise ground level.
  12. Thanks They are using a laser level. The bricklayer I dealt with, who's not been on site yet due to covid, initially said he was going to do the corners first. When I told him that they have layed first course all around, he said this is common to get out of mud and water. Since, I have seen a YouTube video of a large development where they did blocks all around. Their site was similar to ours, flooded and muddy. The blocklayer can clearly be heard saying that they have to lay first course all around to get out of water. Is there a way to check the substructure quality? Perhaps an inspection company or to call out the building control officer? Thanks