Wood89

Planning permission on a green belt 🤦‍♀️

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So the bit of land we would love to build on is a green belt area...has anyone managed to get planning permission for a new build on a green belt? Or is most of the applications a complete no end of dream situation??? 😤🤯

 

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Is there anything there at the moment?

 

we do have planning permission on green belt but the plot has a very long and checkered history.  If there is nothing there, talk to the local planners but my guess is that they will say no

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Nothing there just an empty unused overgrown field which hasn't been touched in 40 years, every other surrounding field is agricultural and regularly used, it just seems just a waste to have a field of overgrown weeds and dumped barbed wire sitting with such plot appeal 😒

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Start with the local planners - they will know if it is at all possible.

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It is possible but I think most have been Paragraph 79 (Para 55) type applications, which generally means your prepared to gamble a quite significant sum of money with a slim chance of success. There are architect  firms that specialise so might be worth seeking one out to get there opinion.

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Our house is built on green belt which was a paddock belonging the cottage we bought, it was only allowed because a field next to us similar to what you have described was granted permission for 5 houses, it was within the settlement boundary which ours wasn’t and we were refused first application however when the 5 houses got the go ahead we approached the local councillor who backed us all the way with the next application and it went through no problem 

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8 minutes ago, Christine Walker said:

Our house is built on green belt which was a paddock belonging the cottage we bought, it was only allowed because a field next to us similar to what you have described was granted permission for 5 houses, it was within the settlement boundary which ours wasn’t and we were refused first application however when the 5 houses got the go ahead we approached the local councillor who backed us all the way with the next application and it went through no problem 

I bet you will be giving him your vote in the future ?

  • Haha 1

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2 hours ago, Wood89 said:

Nothing there just an empty unused overgrown field which hasn't been touched in 40 years, every other surrounding field is agricultural and regularly used, it just seems just a waste to have a field of overgrown weeds and dumped barbed wire sitting with such plot appeal 😒

 

Sadly if that line of thought worked farmers all over the country would let fields go to weeds and dump some barbed wire on it to get planning permission.

 

I think if all the surrounding land is agricultural you don't stand much chance. 

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If its outside of any settlement boundary, isn't within the local plan as future residential development and has no existing buildings that you could wangle conversion of under permitted development for reuse of unwanted agricultural building then I very much doubt you'd get consent to build via any conventional route.  

I believe there is one route that could potentially result in consent for a new build, but it involves creating a business of some sort within the existing land-use permissions for the site (i.e. agricultural for this plot) and then justifying that you need to live on site to operate that business.  Its how that charcoal burner chap on Grand Designs got consent to build in the woods and a couple of friends that run an organic veg growing business are hoping to do this at their fields, but you're definitely playing the long game here and its kind of a lifestyle route rather than just building a home.

Edited by eekoh

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42 minutes ago, eekoh said:

If its outside of any settlement boundary, isn't within the local plan as future residential development and has no existing buildings that you could wangle conversion of under permitted development for reuse of unwanted agricultural building then I very much doubt you'd get consent to build via any conventional route.  

I believe there is one route that could potentially result in consent for a new build, but it involves creating a business of some sort within the existing land-use permissions for the site (i.e. agricultural for this plot) and then justifying that you need to live on site to operate that business.  Its how that charcoal burner chap on Grand Designs got consent to build in the woods and a couple of friends that run an organic veg growing business are hoping to do this at their fields, but you're definitely playing the long game here and its kind of a lifestyle route rather than just building a home.

 

Not quite sure organic veg need 24 hour attendance 🙂 .

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Yeah, I'm not sure exactly of the criteria and I suspect there may be a certain amount of local authority discretion about how they're interpreted.

These guys are on site pretty much all full time tending their crops and as a small scale lifestyle sort of business rather than a hugely profitable commercial enterprise it would definitely be more cost effective for them to live on site.  I think their angle is that its effectively a small holding and it makes sense for them to  both live and work there.

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We got ours because it was just under 4000SQM with a long established boundary on 4 sides. We found some old maps going back to 17th cent that showed the boundaries.

 

The land itself had not been used for agriculture as it was lightly wooded. We do have to build something of "architectural merit" but that was very open to interpretation. 

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