AliG

This will make you feel better about any problems with your house

Recommended Posts

700? Pfft...

 

Hold my beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"They also discovered architraves which are not level, cracking around the window boards, bubbled paintwork and say the turf in their garden was 'lumpy' and 'uneven'."

 

End of days stuff that! 🙄 Totally unheard of! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, jamiehamy said:

"They also discovered architraves which are not level, cracking around the window boards, bubbled paintwork and say the turf in their garden was 'lumpy' and 'uneven'."

 

End of days stuff that! 🙄 Totally unheard of! 

 

At least they have architraves.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Moonshine said:

 

i would say it was pretty bad!

 

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/03/05/12/10598484-6772563-image-a-66_1551787216488.jpg

 

fair enough, some of those are general snags, but the images of the two doors is pretty shocking.

The grass is perfectly striped! 

 

On this area, no developer turfs the back grass. Sister just bought a 5 bed house. Mud out the back. Did some digging (pardon the pun) - it's the norm. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamiehamy said:

On this area, no developer turfs the back grass.

 

i would disagree, i was at a site inspection earlier this year (or late last year) a couple of days before they were handing over a few houses. 

 

They were about to turf the rear gardens and had turf all ready to go, the issue was that it had been very wet, and the gardens looked like the somme. 

 

I am sure that a lot of the sites i go to round here of nearly new houses have turfed rear gardens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only new house we've ever bought had turf laid front and back.  Not sure if this is normal or not, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have worked on houses for over 20 years. These houses have been going on sale for between 2 and 15 million. Even they are full of faults, and some of the standards are shocking. Most young guys on site don't have a scooby doo. Any old boys you meet can't wait to get out of the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The argument you always seem to get is that you have to complete when the builder says the house is finished.

 

It would be nice to see someone say "sue me" and refuse to complete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, AliG said:

The argument you always seem to get is that you have to complete when the builder says the house is finished.

 

It would be nice to see someone say "sue me" and refuse to complete.

 

When I bought my last house in Kent I refused to complete on the day of completion and told the developer exactly that. We visited the site the weekend before completion and all of the houses due to complete later that week were far from finished. I went down at lunchtime on completion day having instructed my solicitor to wait for me to say so before completing and the house was still far from finished. The bathrooms weren't finished, the kitchen appliances hadn't been fitted (the oven was in a box in the middle of the kitchen) and various other things weren't finished. The site office was in meltdown as people arrived with their removal vans and furniture and couldn't get in as builders were still trying to address a million and one things. I instructed my solicitor not to complete and went to the site office and told them. They said that they would sue me and I said I have photos of the house and the debacle in the street so go ahead. They didn't of course and we completed 2 weeks later. We had the luxury of not moving in on completion day however as I still had the old house and we planned to move in later when the fencing etc had been completed. Those people in a chain who had moved out that day had no choice but to move into an unfinished house. Despite that we still had a cricket score of snagging faults when we finally moved in. We weren't the only people to refuse to complete we heard later. It was the developer's end of half year so it was a finance / results based decision rather than when the houses were actually complete! 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The builder of my last house gave me a discount to complete on the end of their financial year, they paid my bridging loan until the original expected completion date and turfed the back garden for free. They used to regularly offer massive discounts on unsold finished houses in the last month of their year (June). I am still disappointed that my parents didn't buy a place reduced from £470k to £400k. They said it was too big, I said at that price just close some of the doors and pretend it's smaller.

 

I never could understand how they got themselves into this position, if they simply stopped for a year it would even out. It seemed to cost them a fortune.

 

I should have asked the CFO, he used to live next to us. TBF they did almost go bankrupt in the recession, when I looked at their accounts they owned over 10 years worth of plots, so maybe it was all about showing the best possible balance sheet and cashflow position on the last day of the year and they didn't care about the effect on profit margins.

 

I think we only had 200 snagging items! They were pretty good at fixing them and none were too major. Oh although we did find out after a couple of years that they hadn't built the roof properly and they had to take all the tiles off to fix it.

Edited by AliG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now