Nick1c

Fermacell pro's and cons

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1 hour ago, joth said:

National bagged plaster shortage means Fermacell has distinct benefit in avoiding wet plastering

 

I've seen more in the market this week - think it is starting to move now. All the merchants are open again so it should soon unblock

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Just on the point of getting this done. I managed to miss the joint filler - I thought it was board, FST, paint. It appears that it’s board (with an expansion gap at 10m), joint fill (50m2 per 5kg bag unless joints left open when it goes to 25m2), FST. My plan is to use a dry lining contractor to get the boards up, I am debating if the rest of the job should be DIY, done by the liners or a combination of me & the decorators.
Any advice?

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Other than "Don't do it!" I would suggest you get someone experienced to give you an inclusive price to include loading out, cutting out sockets, joint stick and their surface finish.

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On 11/05/2020 at 11:36, PeterW said:

 

I've seen more in the market this week - think it is starting to move now. All the merchants are open again so it should soon unblock

 

Sounds like the shortages are still quite bad - we've got a few more months to go so hopefully things will improve before it pushes us to make a rash decision like this!

 

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We have gone for pb ceilings & fermacell walls, finished by the liners. They have delayed the start by 10 days due to supply difficulties. 

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Hi, I’m new to this forum. I’m interested in peoples view on how I should infill the void in an oak truss I’ve just had installed. The architect has suggested Infill the voids of the truss using 50 x 75mm softwood studs at maximum 600mm ctrs with 12.5mm plasterboard and skim finish. Stud partitions to be filled with 75mm Rockwool Acoustic Insulation to achieve adequate sound insulation and 30mins fire resistance. This would lose 100mm of the oak truss depth that is visible. Could I use fermacell instead, would that give me the same fire protection but allow more oak to be visible. I’ve written to my building inspector to ask if it’s possible.

 

thanks in advance

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Hi, 

Lots of great advice and I can see lots of cons but what are the thoughts on the acoustic, water resistance and fire resistance qualities. Despite the extra installation effort this seems to be very beneficial. 

Also what is the view of using Fermacell for flooring. Again there seems to be some advantages from a heating aspect.

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10 hours ago, marcus hudson said:

Hi, 

Lots of great advice and I can see lots of cons but what are the thoughts on the acoustic, water resistance and fire resistance qualities. Despite the extra installation effort this seems to be very beneficial. 

Also what is the view of using Fermacell for flooring. Again there seems to be some advantages from a heating aspect.

I wouldn't use FC tbh, and I've worked with it / alongside it and seen just how much of a complete and total ball-ache it is to use / finish etc. The marketing BS WAAAAAAAY over estimates its capabilities to accept fixings for mounting items too. I'm seriously unimpressed. If you put a screw in, it needs to be piloted first or the 'meat' just tears out with the final turn of the screw, just like a really dense plasterboard. And the FST is just the anti-christ in a tub.

Use FC if you absolutely must, but, for the love of the fictional character known as god, PLEASE plaster it!!!

FWIW, strategic use of plywood for heavy items such as TV's, or Gripit fixings for anything else will suffice for most day to day fixing to PB, plus I do not ever advocate the use of 'white' PB anymore, instead I recommend / use 15mm sound-block PB as it is much more dense and accepts these types of fittings easily. Weigh up the cost of the FC system, including the huge uplift in installation time / labour / consumables, and that more than adequately mitigates the higher costs of the SB PB ( plus you get the inherent acoustic qualities to boot.   

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On 07/09/2021 at 08:08, Nickfromwales said:

15mm sound-block PB as it is much more dense and accepts these types of fittings easily.

Top tip. Is there a layer of fiberglass in some boards?

 I guess you would also benefit from the increased heat capacity (with more mass near the room) smoothing temperature swings. 

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4 hours ago, Iceverge said:

Top tip. Is there a layer of fiberglass in some boards?

 I guess you would also benefit from the increased heat capacity (with more mass near the room) smoothing temperature swings. 

Fractional. Some, yes, but I would say bumping up ton15mm PB would would exceed that value, and keys not forget about a skim coat which also has inherent heat capacity also. 

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Thanks for the further comments. Taking all the replies it looks like FC is suitable in some specific cases but requires a lot of effort and would cost more and there are several other alternatives.

I am still at the planning stage but I was looking for something that avoided the need for much/any plastering, ie a 'dry' solution yet handled insulation and sound well. Same for the floors. 

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