PeterW

The end of the gas hob..??

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12 hours ago, Temp said:

No gas in our village but an LPG hob is very practical. A 47kg cylinder lasts us at least 18 months and costs £50-£80. Might be expensive per kWH compared to mains gas but not much in absolute money.

 

 

We experienced a similar consumption rate over 3 years for hob-only cooking in our previous house. Th only time I bothered to check the bottle fuel level was the week before Christmas out of concern for a trouble free cooking of the turkey.

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A perfect storm for blackouts after 2025 is being formulated. With the old aging nuclear stations going offline due to safety concerns and their replacements nowhere in sight because foreign companies bailed on the Government.

 

Millions of commuters arrive home from work just as PV generation is dropping, they plug in their electric cars then as they step into their super insulated WImpy new build they wonder why it is so cold and so whack up the thermostat of their ASHP and finally to warm up put a carton of soup in their electric hob.

 

 

Edited by epsilonGreedy

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2 hours ago, epsilonGreedy said:

A perfect storm for blackouts after 2025 is being formulated.

 

With the old aging nuclear stations going offline due to safety concerns and their replacements nowhere in sight because foreign companies bailed on the Government.

 

Millions of commuters arrive home from work just as PV generation is dropping, they plug in their electric cars then as they step into their super insulated WImpy new build they wonder why it is so cold and so whack up the thermostat of their ASHP and finally to warm up put a carton of soup in their electric hob.

 

 

Worth noting that the UK has the largest offshore wind potential of any country in the world due to the high and consistent offshore winds and shallow waters.

The transition to electric vehicles is addressed in the report and I remember reading something about 20% of new builds in London which have off street parking must now have car charging points and the other 80% must have the wiring installed for the future.

The papers focus on gas after 2025 but that is only a small part of it.

Currently, transport is the origin of 15% of our pollution but that is due to reduce in the coming years due to electrification and buildings produce 14% and the best way to reduce that is to ban gas on new builds whilst using heat pumps with low temperature wet heating systems and passive house techniques, according to the report.

Lets face it, most of the energy used in a house is for space heating in the winter and to reduce pollution we have to use a lot less energy.

I expect the government will water a lot of it down as usual though.

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I wonder why the headline focuses on gas hobs?  Surely an "end to the gas boiler" would have been a better headline?  No gas means no gas boiler more than it means no gas hob, and the boiler uses way more gas than the hob ever does.

 

Has there been any mention of "no more bottled gas"?

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4 hours ago, epsilonGreedy said:

A perfect storm for blackouts after 2025 is being formulated. With the old aging nuclear stations going offline due to safety concerns and their replacements nowhere in sight because foreign companies bailed on the Government.

 

Millions of commuters arrive home from work just as PV generation is dropping, they plug in their electric cars then as they step into their super insulated WImpy new build they wonder why it is so cold and so whack up the thermostat of their ASHP and finally to warm up put a carton of soup in their electric hob.

 

 

That just serves to highlight the carp housing stock we have that need to be heated in real time otherwise they go cold very quickly.

 

The heat capacity and decrement delay in mine is such that if I only heated it in the daytime and turned the heating off in the evening, I would not notice.

 

The more this "problem" is talked about, the more certain I am we need a modern equivalent of "slum clearance" where the oldest, worst housing stock is replaced en-mass with modern houses.  And I don't just mean current mass market offerings, but proper low energy houses like several of us on here have built or are building.

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21 hours ago, ProDave said:

That's a pathetic target to reduce heating needs by 15% by 2030.

 

Compared to our last house, my heating needs have dropped by 75% and compared to the one before more like 90%

 

The 15% mentioned is for existing  buildings, and from a 2015 base .. for clarity. That is on top of the -15% app. achieved between 1990 and 2015.

 

Having said that, I agree that it is quite timid target, and is not on track for -80% from 1990-2050.

 

Reducing the consumption carbon footprint of a typical house by 50% .. say from a D/E to a B, roughly saves as much as the entire carbon footprint of a new build. SpAnd there are millions and millions of these as opposed to 200-250k new units every year.

 

F

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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Posted (edited)

Listening to BBC Costing the Earth (Dash from Gas):

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/

 

Around 90% of homes in Britain get their hot water and heating from gas-fired boilers. There are 23 million of them in Britain. The Chancellor has banned them from new homes after 2025 and by 2050 they'll be history. The government is committed to phasing them out to meet international climate change commitments. So what are the alternatives to the gas that's provided reliable, reasonably priced heat since it was first piped ashore from the North Sea in the late 1960s? Electric heating is a quick and easy replacement but we would need to massively increase the amount of green electricity that we generate. Hydrogen gas could be burnt in home appliances but producing hydrogen takes a lot of energy and expensive new infrastructure would be needed. Peter Gibbs is on the hunt for solutions, basing himself in the valleys of South Wales where energy companies and their customers are trialling new fuels, new smart technology and new payment methods to cut the carbon from heating our homes.”

Edited by Dreadnaught

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