BMcN

GSE in roof system

Recommended Posts

Has anyone used GSE in roof system?

 

It is not clear in the manual where to pass the cables through.  I presume you can just drill a hole anywhere in the centre of the mount, as this should be a dry area, and pass the cable through?

 

Thanks

Screenshot 2019-01-25 at 09.31.58.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, we have the GSE system.  No need to drill any holes anywhere for cables, they  run into the big hole in the centre and then out under the battens at either side. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JSHarris said:

Yes, we have the GSE system.  No need to drill any holes anywhere for cables, they  run into the big hole in the centre and then out under the battens at either side. 

 

Sorry I just screenshotted that from the manual to show the centre.  I wasn't suggesting drilling the GSE mount.

 

Mine are mounted on sarking as we are in Scotland, so unable to run cables under the straps/battens.  I presume for me I will need to just run each set of connectors through the sarking in the centre of every mount and do the connections inside?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, BMcN said:

 

Sorry I just screenshotted that from the manual to show the centre.  I wasn't suggesting drilling the GSE mount.

 

Mine are mounted on sarking as we are in Scotland, so unable to run cables under the straps/battens.  I presume for me I will need to just run each set of connectors through the sarking in the centre of every mount and do the connections inside?

 

How are you providing the essential ventilation under the panels?  The panels need cooling, from air flow underneath them, hence the need to raise them on battens fitted to counterbattens, as shown in that screen shot (which is exactly as ours are fitted).  We also have sarking, but that's overlaid with counterbattens that run along the line of each rafter, then battens to which the frames and slates are fixed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both wagner and midsummer said that the mounts could be fixed directly to the sarking.  It is a garage roof so will never be a warm roof.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, BMcN said:

Both wagner and midsummer said that the mounts could be fixed directly to the sarking.  It is a garage roof so will never be a warm roof.  

 

I think its more for ventilation under the panels. Keeping the panels cool I believe improves efficiency too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We installed gse in roof on diy basis. We made up extensions and looped them into the house with a connection in the house. This will allow us to fault find and bypass a panel if needed in future very easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With respect to the UK resellers, I'd suggest that they aren't aware of the essential requirement to provide ventilation under all PV panels and I'd question how much real world experience they have with installing in-roof PV systems. 

 

It doesn't matter whether the underlying roof is warm or cold, as the heat comes from the sun shining on the panels.  They can easily reach temperatures of 50 deg C plus in bright sun, and that heat needs to be got rid of, and the way all PV panels are designed is for over-heating to be alleviated by free air ventilation under the panels.  That's why both Easyroof and GSE show the same fixing method for the in-roof frames, with spaces above the sarking provided by counterbattens to allow the essential ventilation.  The eaves and ridge ridge also need to be ventilated to allow air to flow up the roof behind the panels.

 

The main problem is that the panels will have a much reduced output if they run hot, plus the reliability may be impacted, too. Anything you can do to aid the cooling of the panels will improve both performance and reliability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously as the forum dunce i'm likely to be chastised for this, but would a peltier plate system work for cooling, where the warm side could be in the void under the panel, with the whole void being fan-assist ducted out of said void, to help reduce temps.  Could this have the dual effect of keeping the panels cooler therefore the efficiency higher, whilst also giving a sort of warm layer of air to assist interior temperature  by 'insulating' the roof with a layer of warm air?

 

Also - are easyroof and GSE the only/best in roof systems? Struggling to find any others

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Big Neil said:

Obviously as the forum dunce i'm likely to be chastised for this, but would a peltier plate system work for cooling, where the warm side could be in the void under the panel, with the whole void being fan-assist ducted out of said void, to help reduce temps.  Could this have the dual effect of keeping the panels cooler therefore the efficiency higher, whilst also giving a sort of warm layer of air to assist interior temperature  by 'insulating' the roof with a layer of warm air?

 

Also - are easyroof and GSE the only/best in roof systems? Struggling to find any others

 

There are a couple of popular in-roof systems, GSE  and EasyRoof, as you've found.  I've not heard of any others unfortunately.

 

Peltier devices aren't very efficient at pumping heat, only a few percent, which means that there would be a great deal more heat that needs to be got rid of from the hot side of the Peltier element, making the problem of cooling a great deal worse.  The Peltier devices would also use a lot of the power generated by the panel, far more than would be gained from any cooling effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair play @JSHarris. Is there a system which allows the two sides n a system LIKE this, to be seperate, where you could use the hot side for something - heating water for example - and then the cool side be put elsewhere?

Would some sort of heat exchanger system work, a bit like the product as in the link below, albeit under the panels instead of on top of a roof/external surface.

 

https://www.thealternativeenergycompany.co.nz/products/water-heating/retrofit-system

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, there was a fad for combined PV/solar thermal panels a few years ago. Not sure how many actually used heat pumps, which seems the obvious step for low-grade heat like this. AFAIK, they've never really caught on, I assume because the cost of PV came down enough that it just wasn't worth the hassle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello @Ed Davies. I was thinking more in terms of keeping the PV systems cool to maintain efficiency - particularly on warmer days, and I hadn't considered a combined [panel, although i suppose that actually makes sense. I'd love to see one. A big old heat-sink on the back with a piping system to hold an antifreeze and then a heat pump. Sort of like a GSHP but on a roof - a RSHP if you will!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Big Neil said:

 

Also - are easyroof and GSE the only/best in roof systems? Struggling to find any others

 

Viridian Solar are worth a look.  We've got a 4kw Clearline Fusion system; can't comment on the finer points of performance, but it looks good and I only had to run the ashp about half a dozen times for dhw between June and September last year!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/02/2019 at 10:06, JSHarris said:

 

There are a couple of popular in-roof systems, GSE  and EasyRoof, as you've found.  I've not heard of any others unfortunately.

....

 

Bit late to the thread but GB-Sol RIS is the other one I know. AIUI the unique thing with these is, as they manufacturer their own panels they can specify them to fill to any shape and dimensions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now